Page 1 of 1

Cimarron

Posted: Tue Jan 27, 2004 5:49 am
by Archived Topic
What is the etymology of the word cimarron? I've always been told that it means "runaway slave" in Mexican Spanish. Can anyone verify this?
Submitted by Emmanuel Copiaco (Lansing - U.S.A.)

Cimarron

Posted: Tue Jan 27, 2004 6:03 am
by Archived Reply
From Greek. It refers to people who ive in perpetual
mist and darkness, akin to the 'land of the dead'.
Latin 'Cimmerius', Greek 'Kimmerios', Assyrian
'Gimirri' even the bible 'Gomer' Gen.10:2 and
Esk. 38:6.
In Western United States it refers to a stretch of
land that gets rainfall when other near by areas are
desert year round.
Reply from Jim Frederick (Mississauga - Canada)

Cimarron

Posted: Tue Jan 27, 2004 6:17 am
by Archived Reply
Thanks, Jim. I just wonder what connection this word has to Hispanics of Mexican origin because it shows up in their surnames (although not as common as Lopez or Vargas or Garcia). Is it just Mexican in origin or did that also come from Spain? So the "runaway slave" theory has no foundation then?
Reply from Emmanuel Copiaco (Lansing - U.S.A.)

Cimarron

Posted: Tue Jan 27, 2004 6:32 am
by Archived Reply
The "runaway slave" theory is not so obsolete.
Mexico did not have slaves (Outlawed in 1810)but
American slaves who fled to Mexico had to pass
through lands with water, or else parish.
When relating their tales of woe to the locals
the word 'cimmaron' arose to describe their flight
through the South West desert.
Reply from Jim Frederick (Mississauga - Canada)