be shod of me

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be shod of me

Post by Archived Topic » Fri Jul 30, 2004 11:46 am

Hello, I'm trying to find the derivation of the term "to be shod of". Everything I've found just says it's the pp of shoe. My grandfather used it in the same way I'd use "be rid of". Ex. "I'll do it just to be shod of you"

Can anyone help me??

Thank you,

Laurie, Sacramento CA - USA
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be shod of me

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jul 30, 2004 12:01 pm

Laurie, I am stumped by this one. I found many examples on the web of the phrase being used just as you suggested, but haven’t been able to find ‘shod’ defined in this sense in any regular or slang dictionary I’ve checked. It looks, as you said, to mean ‘rid of’ in the contexts in which it is used. The only thing I can imagine is that people are somehow employing it as a bastardized past tense of ‘shed’ in the sense of to cast off or let fall, and thus be ‘shod of’ it.
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<But if by answering your questions I may be shod of you all the more quickly, I am at your disposal! What do you want?>

<The island has been, miraculously, largely uncorrupted by materialism - even the wealthy are committed to guarding the Tobago wine - maintaining simple lifestyles, shod of petty prejudices.>

<I say it with a feeling of relief that at least the world will have gotten shod of an unwanted burden.>

<Shod of all the misleading terminology, this so-called celebration is nothing more . . . >

<apparently his provider wants shod of him as you suggest>

<Conservative crank Buckley must be completely shod of original thought to
craft such a book. He's an elitist bastard by any measure.> [of ‘The Un-Making of a Mayor’ (1966). Sorry Leif – obviously the ravings of some leftist nut case.(<:) I liked Buckley’s reply when asked what would be the first thing he’d do if he was elected –‘Demand a recount.’]
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This one is extremely baffling and would appreciate comments from anyone who knows what’s going on here.
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Ken G – December 21, 2002

Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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be shod of me

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jul 30, 2004 12:15 pm

I can't give any reasons why, but my Texas grandpappy always pronounced it with a hard "T."

As in, "I'd like to be shot of that dam' paint gelding" or whatever it was that had roused his ire at the moment.

(shay - Illinois)
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be shod of me

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jul 30, 2004 12:29 pm

The correct word is indeed 'shot', not 'shod'. I don't have access to my Cassell's dictionary of slang where I am at the moment, but I am certain it must be in there listed under 'be shot of'. With mystification proliferating in the USA, my guess is that it's a much commoner expression in the UK.

Shay, what's a _paint_ gelding?
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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be shod of me

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jul 30, 2004 12:44 pm

Erik: After you cut the testicles off, you can paint the area any color you like. *G*

I think the word that is being sought is: shut, as in shut of. Here's the OED take:

11. a. †To set (a person) free from, relieve of (something troublesome). Obs. exc. in passive (dial. and colloq.) to be, get shut of, (dial.) shut on, to shut one's hands of: to be rid of, free from; also ellipt.

?a1500 Chester Pl. (1847) II. 31 Though he have healed thee, Shute from us shall he not be. Ibid. 33 To shutte hym of his dangere. 1575–6 Durham Depos. (Surtees) 312 This examinate promised+that he wold marye the said Grace+so that he might be shutt of the promises he hadd maid to one Marian Raic. 1596 Nashe Saffron Walden To Rdr. D3, Doo what I can, I shall not be shut of him. 1621 Cade Serm. 45 He cannot be quiet till hee bee shut of it [his divell]. 1692 Scarronides ii. Pref. 2 After his Taylor and Valet have shut their hands of him. 1737 Whiston Josephus, Antiq. xiv. i. §3 His own life would be in danger, unless he+got shut of Aristobulus. 1827 J. F. Cooper Prairie xii, Happy will it prove for the boy if he is well shut of them. 1848 Mrs. Gaskell Mary Barton I. v. 68 As for a bad man, one's glad enough to get shut on him. 1890 ‘R. Boldrewood’ Col. Reformer (1891) 223 Types which all cattleholders agree in desiring to ‘get shut of’. 1892 Stevenson & Osbourne Wrecker xxii, Your family pays money to be shut of you. 1914 D. H. Lawrence Widowing of Mrs. Holroyd iii. 84 Who dost think wor goin' ter stop when we knowed 'e on'y kep on so's to get shut on us. 1976 S. Barstow Right True End i. iv. 65 ‘I haven't got her.’ ‘You're well shut, from all I hear.’

Leif, WA, USA

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be shod of me

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jul 30, 2004 12:58 pm

Nice work Leif, That was indeed tricky. I shut of known better than to even consider giving websearch babblespeak any currency (can always find a couple of hundred of almost anything), especially the words of that illiterate bastard (more sensitively – that misinformed gentleperson) who had the testicles (hmm!), and/or the ovaries, to call Herr Buckley ‘a conservative crank.’

Ken – December 22. 2002

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be shod of me

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jul 30, 2004 1:13 pm

Thanks Leif! Nice work.

Laurie
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be shod of me

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jul 30, 2004 1:27 pm

Laurie, As some folks would say ‘bless your heart.’ Thanks is not a response we hear that often around here!

Happy Holidays,

Ken – December 22, 2002

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be shod of me

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jul 30, 2004 1:41 pm

Ken, is it worse to be extremely baffled than just baffled?

John, Cal
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be shod of me

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jul 30, 2004 1:56 pm

John, For those with a dearth of imagination, there’s probably very little difference.

Ken – December 22, 2002

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be shod of me

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jul 30, 2004 2:10 pm

Eric; a paint gelding is what folks in y'all's part of the world would refer to a piebald neutered horse.
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be shod of me

Post by Archived Reply » Fri Jul 30, 2004 2:25 pm

Be shod of me baby needs a new pair of shoes said the horse to the farrier.
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Re: be shod of me

Post by Imageline » Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:18 pm

Hi Laurie, yes, I am from New Zealand and my parents used to say the same thing. Well shod of something meant well rid of. It's not a term I've heard for years but there are many terms that were once used in common conversation here which are no longer heard. Our use of language has become very simplified indeed.
Al.
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