foot vs. feet

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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 7:15 pm

But folks, you should look at feet/foot from a standpoint of lurking danger; not so much of the dreaded "foot-and-mouth" disease, but, the progressive and incurable, "foot-in-mouth" blight.

Did you know that the difference between "foot-and-mouth" disease and "feet-in-mouth" is only one foot?


Reply from Felix Scribe (Earth, Delware - U.S.A.)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 7:29 pm

Felix, thanks for your tongue-in-cheek thoughts. By the way, can you guys imagine how a cell phone (term covered on thread #416) would look if the distance between the ear and the mouth were two feet?
Reply from Hans Joerg Rothenberger (Walenstadt - Switzerland)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 7:44 pm

...surrounded by limestone walls that were 12-feet thick and 27-feet high "Homer's Troy..." Louis Meixler, AP, June 19

Technicalities aside, how could an AP writer, whose entire career is built around communicating intelligently, be so completely consumed by transient whims of the grammarians as to commit such a palpable outrage?
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 7:58 pm

Dale, Wow, I’m with you. That’s really ugly. It’s my opinion that she just totally blew that one. I know of no rule by which that would be considered correct by any sane grammarian. I just took a quick glance through several style guide (Chicago Book of Style, New York Public Library Writer’s Guide, . . . ) and there is no way!
___________________

Ken G – June 19, 2004



Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 8:13 pm

Should she have used "hemipodion" or "hemipodia"?
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 8:27 pm

Edwin; I think your word "hemipodia" is incorrectly spelled? I'm really not 100 percent sure.
Reply from Ania Polak (Lublin - Poland)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 8:41 pm

How would it be with the metric system?

Would the wall be 3.7 meters tic (french) and 8.22 meters high?

Reply from Bruce Capwell (Boston, Ma - U.S.A.)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 8:56 pm

Edwin, hemipodia are a bit tricky these days because their dimension was a local matter. It looks like the inhabitants of Aigina had the biggest feet in ancient Greece, their hemipodion measuring 16.7 cm. In Attica, only 20 km across the sea from Aigina, the hemipodion was only 14.8 cm. With a difference of 2.9 cm over that short distance, can you imagine the size of a Trojan hemipodion, 280 km from Attica?
Ania, I think "hemipodia" is ok.
Reply from Hans Joerg Rothenberger (Walenstadt - Switzerland)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 9:10 pm

I think we'd wobble if we only had two-and-a-half toes, Hans. Is the decrease in foot-size a relativistic effect, do you think, or did the 20km swim shrink the Aigininians' feet?
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 9:25 pm

Can you imagine two two-foot feet becoming two one-foot feet?
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 9:39 pm

Edwin, I own an old gaff cutter in the Aegean Sea and know the area pretty well. I have never seen a significant change of position between Aigina and Attica, so I have to assume that the different hemipodia cannot be caused by a relativistic effect. And swimming as a means of transportation was not quite common in those days. They did have ships and boats. Maybe the caulking ("kalaphatisma" in Greek) skills of their boatbuilders were somewhat questionable, so the bilge water was sloshing around the passengers' feet during the whole shopping trip to Piraeus. But I cannot imagine that the ASA (Aiginetan Standardization Agency) used the feet of newly returned visitors to Athens as the basis of their measures. Let's not forget that, actually, we are not talking about whole feet. A hemipodion is a half foot. Maybe surgeons in Aigina and on the mainland used different techniques to halve feet.
Reply from Hans Joerg Rothenberger (Walenstadt - Switzerland)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 9:53 pm

Bilge water sloshing around the passengers' feet! Did the Greek seafarers have have a toe-hold, in the Aegean?
And do British and Iranian sailors use the same units of measurement?
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 10:08 pm

Edwin, sometimes Athens did use Aigina as a foothold in the Aegean, as it did with many other islands, and, if deemed necessary, it also applied to them what wrestlers call a toehold, but that's a different matter.
As for the incident in the Shatt al-Arab, I assume that both sides use the same units but maybe not the same charts, let alone the same level of local knowledge. Most likely, an Iranian helmsman know the area like the back of his hand, while his British counterpart has to rely on GPS.
Reply from Hans Joerg Rothenberger (Walenstadt - Switzerland)
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