foot vs. feet

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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 3:39 pm

Oh yes, and it's apparently "ProudFEET".
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 3:53 pm

Sure, Edwin, and the plural of 'spouse' is 'spice.'
Reply from Hans Joerg Rothenberger (Walenstadt - Switzerland)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 4:08 pm

Then we could say that many hicespice are afraid of hice mice, Hans. I was more scared of Scary Spouse.
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 4:22 pm

Since mice have feet, maybe spice wear beet and very hungry grice may eat reet. Not sure about Melanie Brown's heet, though.
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 4:37 pm

Cuckoo clocks aren't the only thing the Swiss enjoy winding up!
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 4:51 pm

Edwin, cuckoo clocks come from the Black Forest, Germany. I have yet to see one in a Swiss home - which doesn't mean they are not sold in Swiss tourist traps. Maybe those are made in Taiwan.
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 5:05 pm

Hmm. Interesting. A cuckoo with a Chinese accent!
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Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 5:20 pm

Cantonese - that MUST be Switzerland!
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 5:34 pm

Edwin, maybe that explains some strange place names in Switzerland, such as Tinizong.
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 5:49 pm

Tinizong! What a wonderful name! (It could relate to poor radio reception because you let your mountains grow too high, Hans.)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 6:03 pm

Edwin, you made me wonder whether Canton, Michigan, in the western 'burbs of Detroit, was founded by Swiss or Chinese immigrants.
As for our mountains - there once were plans for flattening them out to make traffic and radio communication easier. However, one wiseacre found out that folding down all those steep slopes would about triple the surface area of the country, so for peace's sake those plans were discarded. Instead they invented the alphorn to transmit messages to secluded valleys that couldn't be reached by VHF.
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 6:17 pm

And re-designed cheeses to allow the sound through.
I suppose I ought to check whether "wiseacre" is PC in the UK nowadays - we probably have to say "wisehectare". Although that would seem to exaggerate their area of expertise.
And I'm sure SOME cuckoo clocks overwinter in Valais - some might add the comment, "Time flies."
If English is just your fifth language, Hans, I'd hate to have to match you in one of your stronger suits - I don't know a single word of Alphorn.
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 6:32 pm

Edwin, thanks for the compliment.
Sometimes I wonder how much you Britons are losing by going decimal. A "wiseacre" would be a "wise-0.40468-hectare," and "Give a man 2.54 cm and he'll take 1.609 km" sounds downright silly.
Hey, now we're almost back to the original topic of this thread!
Reply from Hans Joerg Rothenberger (Walenstadt - Switzerland)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 6:46 pm

And Hans, that’s because, as that profound – somehow I see a Carol Burnette character in curlers saying it – piece of nouveau folk philosophy, instant proverb (circa 1967), and overnight cliché says, ‘What goes around comes around.’
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Ken G – June 19, 2004

Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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foot vs. feet

Post by Archived Reply » Tue Jan 01, 2002 7:01 pm

Ken, I've never looked at the use of feet, foots or footses from such a hairy point of view. Of course that proverb originally had a different meaning, although I know that these days it is even (ab-?)used by recycling firms.
Reply from Hans Joerg Rothenberger (Walenstadt - Switzerland)
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