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cell / mobile

Posted: Tue Jan 01, 2002 12:32 am
by Archived Reply
Evidently the Lamborghini method of levitation is more effective than meditation, albeit not as cheap.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)

cell / mobile

Posted: Tue Jan 01, 2002 12:46 am
by Archived Reply
Hans,apology accepted. I believe the Turks pronounce and write the name as Ahmet.My Grandmother(German) calls me Achmed.
Ahmed

Reply from Ahmed ELNamer (Dawson Creek - Canada)

cell / mobile

Posted: Tue Jan 01, 2002 1:01 am
by Archived Reply
Ahmed, actually your Grandmother is right in that the 'h' in your name stands for an Arabic letter that is pronounced somewhere in the whole range between 'h' and a velar fricative sound that's written 'ch' in German and 'j' in Spanish, to name just two examples. Native English speakers have a hard time pronouncing that sound. That's why they say "Baha California," which hurts the ears of every Mexican.
Reply from Hans Joerg Rothenberger (Walenstadt - Switzerland)

cell / mobile

Posted: Tue Jan 01, 2002 1:15 am
by Archived Reply
Yes, in the Arabic (Arabich) language there are letters that are not easily pronounced. The 'h', in particular. For some Arabs learning English it is the 'P' and the 'b'. My English teacher had the best method for making the distinction between the 2 letters. He would have the pupil light a match and ask them to pronounce the 'b' and then the 'p'. Most often the flame is extinguished after the letter 'p' is mastered.
Ahmed
31st of May 2004

Reply from Ahmed ELNamer (Dawson Creek - Canada)

cell / mobile

Posted: Tue Jan 01, 2002 1:29 am
by Archived Reply
This is an old term, cellular radio --- see 3.)

Main Entry: cel·lu·lar
Pronunciation: 'sel-y&-l&r
Function: adjective
Etymology: New Latin cellularis, from cellula living cell, from Latin, diminutive of cella small room
1 : of, relating to, or consisting of cells
2 : containing cavities : having a porous texture <cellular rocks>
3 : of, relating to, or being a radiotelephone system in which a geographical area (as a city) is divided into small sections each served by a transmitter of limited range so that any available radio channel can be used in different parts of the area simultaneously
- cel·lu·lar·i·ty /"sel-y&-'lar-&-tE/ noun


Cellular Radio = mobile communications

A system which provides a simple, convenient means of communication for people who wish to keep in touch when travelling. The first mobile communication system was ship-borne radio, and there have since been widespread developments in the field of military communications. In modern times the term also refers to personal communication systems such as CB radio, radio paging, and car and pocket phones which use cellular radio.

Cellular radio employs local radio transmitters, covering small areas (cells), which receive and transmit calls in association with the telecommunications network. Direct-dial calls using special handsets can be made on foot, from cars and trains, and now from aircraft.

Ania

Reply from Ania Polak (Lublin - Poland)

cell / mobile

Posted: Tue Jan 01, 2002 1:44 am
by Archived Reply
Australian must be behind the times then....they are always 'mobiles' here. I guess that's because they are so 'mobile'? Functionality vs Technicality. Alas I must be one of the few who do not possess one.
Reply from Gillian Gardner (Melbourne - Australia)