Full-time student

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Full-time student

Post by Archived Topic » Mon Dec 31, 2001 4:22 pm

I am an English tutor and take on students via the Internet. In a letter to an applicant I wrote: 'On-line consulting is free provided you're my full-time student' which meant (for me) we start having no less than two two-hour sessions per week on a regular basis. Is my using 'full-time student' justified in this case?
Submitted by Julie Kay (Bronnitsy - Russia)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 4:37 pm

In Britain, the term 'full-time student' would normally indicate someone receiving face-to-face tuition (or attending lectures) for 30 hours a week or more at an educational institution.

Nowadays, when there are so many variations on the mode of learning, it would seem preferable to me to spell out exactly what the assumptions or requirements are regarding the use of your services, and to avoid using terminology that is liable to mean different things in different settings.

In this case, it seems desirable for you to clarify the minimum level of sessions needed to qualify for free consultations to both this and subsequent applicants.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 4:51 pm

Thank you, Erik, I think it's truly should be clarified. I wonder if there's any private messaging service becuase I wouldn't like to clutter these interesting place with my questions of whose linguistic value I'm dubious.
Reply from Julie Kay (Bronnitsy - Russia)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 5:05 pm

Don't worry, Julie. Yours is exactly the sort of question that this site is geared to help answer. Anyone who doesn't agree can just click the 'Back' button.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 5:20 pm

"Avoid using terminology that is liable to mean different things in different settings"?! But isn't Russia a Democracy nowadays, Erik? How will they fool most of the people most of the time?
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 5:34 pm

Dang, Edwin. You got me there.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 5:49 pm

On reflection, Edwin, perhaps you agree with Mencken that "Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want, and deserve to get it good and hard" ?
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 6:03 pm

My appreciation of Churchill's ideology increased enormously when I came across the quote,"Democracy is the worst possible form of government. Apart from all the others." Then wobbled upon reading his, "Hess, you say? Put him in a cell for a while. We're watching a Marx Brothers film."
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 6:17 pm

My favorite Winston quote is: "The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter."

Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 6:32 pm

I suppose Chris Patten comes as close as anyone to capturing the spirit of the modern democratic dispensation: "In a democracy everybody has a right to be represented, including the jerks."

2004 being election year in the USA, I'm hoping to see a different bunch of jerks represented this November.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 6:46 pm

Folks, don't listen to Erik; If it wasn't for the USA and all its jerks, England would not exist today nor would it be speaking English.

Hail Hit-la

Reply from August Hit-la (Berlin - Germany)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 7:01 pm

I know a bunch of critters who're thinking of suing the Republican Party - or is it the Pyjama Party.
And we now know where Guy Fawkes made his big mistake - he shouldn't have used BLACK powder.
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 7:15 pm

Why did they call him Guido?
Ahmed
21st of May, 2004
Reply from Ahmed ELNamer (Dawson Creek - Canada)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 7:29 pm

He was certainly no Boy Scout.
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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Full-time student

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 7:44 pm

Guy Fawkes was a Republican?
Reply from August Hit-la (Berlin - Germany)
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