Naming an establishment

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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Topic » Mon Dec 31, 2001 8:41 am

Do you have to run a law firm in order to name your establishment with two surnames (i.e. Baram and Jonscott)? It's just so common, and I haven't heard of any other professional business doing it.
Submitted by Zachary Walls (Dixon - U.S.A.)
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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 8:56 am

You mean like Sears and Roebuck? Not to mention all the architects, accountants, ad agencies... Look in your local phone book for a lot of other examples.

Lois, May 11, 2004
Reply from Lois Martin (Birmingham, AL - U.S.A.)
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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 9:10 am

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceuticals (No More Tears baby shampoo, among many other products) for another example.
Reply from Russ Cable (Dallas, TX - U.S.A.)
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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 9:25 am

I just thought there was some unwritten rule, and people who didn't abide by it were scoffed at. As if it was just not done, or at least shouldn't be unless very much justified or desereved. But you've reassured my confidence. I'll take your answers as official advisory permission and justification. That way, if they don't like the idea, I can just say two complete (yet very trustworthy) strangers said it was alright.
Reply from Zachary Walls (Dixon - U.S.A.)
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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 9:39 am

What if the strangers had also offered you sweets at the same time?
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 9:53 am

Hey, we don't even have to go to "professionals" like accountants and ad agencies. Doesn't anyone remember "Sanford and Son"?
Reply from K. Allen Griffy (Springfield, IL - U.S.A.)
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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 10:08 am

Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, Hungerdunger, and McCormick - and I think I've left a Hungerdunger out, and the most important one, too - were not a legal firm (or not a very legal one).
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 10:22 am

In that case, amid so much absence of legality, could the absent Hungerdunger be said to be particularly important at all?
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 10:37 am

Absolutely - he was No. 2 on the most-wanted list - after John Hillinger-Dillinger.
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 10:51 am

So named on account of his double-barrelled shotgun?
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 11:05 am

I thought he was most often seen bearinga-derringer, in the company of the infamous Mac the Knife and his associates Frank and Sally.
Clyde and Bonney used to run Tiger with them when they weren't trying to raise the money to set up a legal firm. They eventually gave up when they found there ain't no Sanity Clause.
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)
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Naming an establishment

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 31, 2001 11:20 am

There's a dentists' supplier in Gloucester called "Tyler, Crown and Bridge"

One founder by the way.

16.08.04
Reply from Graham Godwin (Bath - England)
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