Is this not too wordy?

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Is this not too wordy?

Post by Archived Topic » Sat Dec 29, 2001 6:03 pm

Is this usage correct? I find it somewaht dressy and noticeably verbose.

"I invite you to attend this lecture and imbibe the insight of wisdom from our respected [XXX]."
Submitted by Sathyaish Chakravarthy (New Delhi - India)
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Is this not too wordy?

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Dec 29, 2001 6:17 pm

It is both grovellingly obsequious AND verbose, but - good taste and Uriah Heepishness aside - not incorrect.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Is this not too wordy?

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Dec 29, 2001 6:32 pm

Apart, I suppose from the employment of the mixed metaphor. One can imbibe a drink, but not an insight.

Which reminds me of a poorly conceived cliché that I've come across in certain works of fiction: "She drank in the view [from the balcony / yacht / mountain top / zenith of mediocrity]."
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)
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Is this not too wordy?

Post by Archived Reply » Sat Dec 29, 2001 6:46 pm

im·bibe (ĭm-bîb')

v., -bibed, -bib·ing, -bibes.

v.tr.
To drink.
To absorb or take in as if by drinking: “The whole body . . . imbibes delight through every pore” (Henry David Thoreau).
To receive and absorb into the mind: “Gladstone had . . . imbibed a strong prejudice against Americans” (Philip Magnus).
Obsolete. To permeate; saturate.
v.intr.
To drink alcoholic beverages.

[Middle English embiben, to soak up, saturate, from Latin imbibere, to drink in, imbibe : in-, in; see in–2 + bibere, to drink.]

im·bib'er n.
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The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved


Reply from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)
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