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I was just hammered

Posted: Sat Dec 29, 2001 4:08 pm
by Archived Topic
I was just corrected on a usage I do not think is wrong. I was just being liberal. Kindly advice.

From: Harinder Singh
To: Sathyaish Chakravarthy

Dear Sathyaish

I didn't know people stayed on telephone extensions. That is a very funny usage? Going by all the established English norms, it is an incorrect usage. English is a language that is constantly evolving; and it is ideal to be tolerant of novel usages; but this usage is too far-fetched to be treated correctly.

Thanks
Harinder

-----Original Message-----
From: Sathyaish Chakravarthy
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2004 4:37 PM
To: Harinder Singh

Dear Harinder,

I stay on a shared extension 108. However, I would personally come up to you for the errors I think I spotted.

Regards,
Sathyaish
Submitted by Sathyaish Chakravarthy (New Delhi - India)

I was just hammered

Posted: Sat Dec 29, 2001 4:22 pm
by Archived Reply
>Kindly advice.

Oops! I am damned. Sorry for using a noun there. It should've been "please advise".
Reply from Sathyaish Chakravarthy (New Delhi - India)

I was just hammered

Posted: Sat Dec 29, 2001 4:37 pm
by Archived Reply
It is not standard British English usage. In the UK, people would be more likely to write "I share extension 108", or to say "I am on extension 108 with [named colleague]".

On the other hand, your colleague too uses a phrase that sounds odd to British ears, namely "...this usage is too far-fetched to be treated correctly".

In Britain, one would be likely to write "...this usage is too far-fetched to be regarded as correct," or "...this usage is too far-fetched to be considered acceptable."

But don't overlook the fact that the English that is used in India has its own idioms and customary ways of saying certain things. So I am not sure whether when your colleague refers to "established English norms" he has in mind British English norms or Indian English norms. They are not identical.
Reply from Erik Kowal ( - England)

I was just hammered

Posted: Sat Dec 29, 2001 4:51 pm
by Archived Reply
Sathyaish, Another common form would be ‘I am at extension 108.’

Ken G – March 19, 2004

Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)

I was just hammered

Posted: Sat Dec 29, 2001 5:05 pm
by Archived Reply
"...to be treated correctly"

Erik, I concur on this. It sounds wierd to me too. It is *very* *very* *very* extremely Indian, and I don't like it one bit.

Ken, I could've written just that, yet I didn't. It was after all an email. I wrote the email on a one-to-one basis without a second thought, so it was extemperaneous and had no revisionary thought invested. As I said earlier, I was just being liberal.

Would it be appropriate to believe that the soverign intent of expression is conveyance and that language must follow or emulate or exude feeling and not vice-versa. I *still* am taken by a *feeeeling* of continuity, longevity and location when I say, "I >stay< on extention 108" or rather "I stay at..."

Thanks, guys, for helping. You make this a wonderful place.
Reply from Sathyaish Chakravarthy (New Delhi - India)

I was just hammered

Posted: Sat Dec 29, 2001 5:20 pm
by Archived Reply
I think I prefer the sound of Indian English. However, British elephants are rarer than their Indian counterparts.
And they can't share extensions - they make too many trunk calls.
Reply from Edwin Ashworth (Oldham - England)

I was just hammered

Posted: Sat Dec 29, 2001 5:34 pm
by Archived Reply
Satyaish .. realise that even here there is disagreement .. Ken's use of "at" is foreign usage to me as in Australia we would always say that we are "on" a particular extension .. ain't English fun .. *laughing* ..
WoZ of Oz. 30/03/04.
Reply from Wizard of Oz (Newcastle - Australia)

I was just hammered

Posted: Sat Dec 29, 2001 5:49 pm
by Archived Reply
Interesting flow here. I have recently noticed the use of "stay" to mean "live, dwell, or abide" in Black English. (African American) As in "where do you stay?" Or "She stays on Storey Lane."

As for phones, speaking as I do from Texas, we would say one is "on" the phone if one is actually engaged in conversation, or using the phone. But we regard the numbers as a sort of physical address, so I might say, "I can be reached at ###" or "I'm at ###" In the case of a shared extension, I might say I "have" a shared extension or that I "use" a shared extension.
Not that this is much help unless you visit Texas...
Reply from Chrystal Hays (Dallas Texas in the - U.S.A.)