25 maps that illustrate the history of English

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25 maps that illustrate the history of English

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Sep 20, 2015 10:50 pm

These 25 maps — each accompanied by a supporting description — give a broad-brush illustration of how the English language has developed.
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Re: 25 maps that illustrate the history of English

Post by tony h » Wed Sep 23, 2015 5:44 pm

Erik : there should be a warning message on this point. I have just spent a ridiculously long time poring over the maps. And wondering about the statistics they represent.

Thank you.
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Signature: tony

With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: 25 maps that illustrate the history of English

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Sep 23, 2015 6:31 pm

Sorry about the lack of a warning, Tony. But I'm glad you found the maps interesting. :)
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Re: 25 maps that illustrate the history of English

Post by tony h » Sat Sep 26, 2015 11:02 am

The source for the tree http://www.ethnologue.com/ is also fascinating.

But further down the page is a map by jakubmarian. Going to that site shows some other interesting facts:
http://jakubmarian.com/is-that-always-r ... strictive/

and the one that generated discussion in the snug http://jakubmarian.com/wine-consumption ... er-capita/
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Signature: tony

With the right context almost anything can sound appropriate.

Re: 25 maps that illustrate the history of English

Post by Edwin F Ashworth » Wed Sep 30, 2015 11:24 pm

Just back from another jaunt to the SW, Erik. It was too cloudy to see you as we flew over. The back has almost recovered from the jolts on a beautifully scenic railroad that shall remain nameless.

There were UK and US citizens on the coach or bus as some called it, and we had some amusing discussions about language differences. The Americans were most amused to discover what 'trump' means in English. And 'I've dropped my purse' caused puzzled looks.

Fascinating statistics, lovely maps. But which one shows the way out of the Klondike Bluffs?
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End of topic.
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