Pricey!

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Pricey!

Post by Bobinwales » Wed Jun 18, 2008 11:30 am

When I got home last night my moiety told me that she wanted to go somewhere expensive.

So I took her to a petrol station.
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Re: Pricey!

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Jun 18, 2008 5:12 pm

Bob, That must have been a GAS! (<;)
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Re: Pricey!

Post by trolley » Wed Jun 18, 2008 5:38 pm

Gas stations over here have started showing porno movies at the pumps so you can watch someone getting screwed at the same time as you.
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Re: Pricey!

Post by Bobinwales » Thu Jun 19, 2008 12:28 pm

According to THIS we are paying £8.74 per US gallon, that's $17 US according to the converters I just used.

If this is right, I would say that is beyond a joke, so this thread may be in the wrong place!

Anyone like to check my sums, I'm not known for my ability in maths?
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Re: Pricey!

Post by kagriffy » Thu Jun 19, 2008 1:24 pm

Bob, I think the column you found 8.74 in was the equivalent US $ per US gallon price. So it isn't £8.74 per gallon, it's $8.74 per gallon. Of course, that's still pretty bad--we just topped $4.00/gallon and people here are outraged!
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Re: Pricey!

Post by Bobinwales » Thu Jun 19, 2008 1:58 pm

That makea a hell of a bit more sense Allen. I told you that I'm no good at sums.
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Re: Pricey!

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Jun 19, 2008 4:02 pm

1 UK gallon is 0.8326738 x 1 US gallon. (To put it the opposite way, 1 US gallon is 1.20095 x 1 UK gallon.)

So $8.74 per US gallon equates to $(8.74 x 0.8326738) = $7.28 per UK gallon. At today's interbank exchange rate (see http://www.oanda.com) that amounts to £3.72.

The price in pounds for a UK gallon is £4.47.
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Re: Pricey!

Post by russcable » Thu Jun 19, 2008 4:10 pm

kagriffy wrote:... it's $8.74 per gallon. ... we just topped $4.00/gallon ...
My boss was recently in the UK where he said he paid about $10 for a Whopper at Burger King which is about $3.29 here. I couldn't find prices for Burger King on the Net, but I did find that McDonald's value menu which is $1 per item here is 99p = $1.97 there.

So you can't readily compare one item price as the whole economy is different.
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Re: Pricey!

Post by Ken Greenwald » Thu Jun 19, 2008 4:30 pm

As much as I hate to say it, I think that the high price of gasoline is a good thing – seems like the only thing that really grabs our attention when it comes to using it. And if the price of gas should go down, I think that the best thing our government could do is slap a one or two dollar tax on it to bring the price back up – which, of course, would never fly politically.

This is déjà vu all over again from the 1970s. And what did we learn then? Seems like pain in the pocketbook is the only thing that makes a real impression. And, according to all I’ve heard, the sales of gas-guzzling vehicles is now way down and people are driving less. They are carpooling when they can, using more public transportation where it is available, and are cutting down on their trips whenever possible – I know I am. And alternative sources of energy are now finally getting the serious attention they always deserved (although ethanol from corn is a disaster and should be banned, which everyone but the farmers, their surrogates in Congress, and the uninformed, now seem to agree on).

Looks to me like no pain, no gain! Sad but true, at least as far as our addiction to gasoline is concerned.
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Re: Pricey!

Post by russcable » Thu Jun 19, 2008 5:40 pm

Ken Greenwald wrote:... the sales of gas-guzzling vehicles is now way down ...
There's no silver lining without a dark cloud... The resale value of gas-guzzlers has plummeted forcing many owners to have to keep them as they can't afford to pay off the upside-down loan or to buy a better car without the trade-in value they were expecting their truck to have.
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Re: Pricey!

Post by sabine » Mon Jun 30, 2008 7:22 am

I can't say I agree with your happy glee about the gas pricing. I would if there were some good alternatives to gas guzzling vehicles on the market, but even the smaller cars (mine is a 4cyl.) and the hybrids are really very poor alternatives and many of the new ones are extremely high priced. Where I live there is very little public transportation as it is not a major city or even a minor one, and I'm not interested in living in a more congested area. As for what we learned in the 70's? NOTHING, or more reasonable alternatives would long ago have been out on the market. The 4cyl. Toyota I bought in 1985 got 40-45 mpg. When I bought my current used Chevy 3 years ago, there were NO cars I could find that could realistically make that claim.
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Re: Pricey!

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Jun 30, 2008 8:01 am

Most of the makers whose cars are sold in the USA have not been offering more economical cars because until recently they made the most profit from selling petrol-engined vehicles which use the advances in efficiency from newer engine designs to deliver more power and quicker acceleration instead of better fuel economy.

This model worked as long as oil was relatively cheap, such as during the early 1990s, when oil languished at circa $29 a barrel (a very far cry from today's $140+), a price point that was well within the reach of the vast majority of drivers in the US.

Unfortunately the diesel cars of the 1980s, while they offered better economy than their petrol-engined equivalents, were too smelly, slow and dirty to make a significant impact on the buying behaviour of American consumers. The higher level of taxation of diesel fuel compared with petrol has also been a significant disincentive for US manufacturers to promote diesel cars.

While the global rise in the cost of petroleum-based fuels is not welcomed by most consumers, it is having the beneficial side effect of making the commercialization of sun and wind power, among other renewable energy sources, more viable, and thereby attracting greater investment in these technologies as well as in improved vehicle technologies. This is especially so in such European countries as Denmark, Portugal and Germany, not to mention Brazil. This additional investment will undoubtedly hasten the availability of such devices as solar cells at prices that will make them much more attractive to a mass market.

Germany also provides for the purchase by electricity utilities of self-generated electricity from consumers at a price that is higher than the price they charge those same consumers for the electricity they buy from the utility. Apart from the usefulness of this arrangement in creating a market for self-generated electricity, it also helps to avoid the necessity or incentive for home generators of electricity to store their surplus energy in expensive, materials-hungry and space-consuming battery banks. This is clearly a much more efficient solution.

So while it seems likely that we will all have to take the financial hit from higher petroleum prices for the foreseeable future, this may be somewhat offset by the benefits accruing from the future mainstreaming of a number of renewable energy sources in those countries that are far-sighted enough to create favourable conditions for their introduction and deployment.

To what extent this will include the US is currently very much in question: Congress has failed to extend the federal tax breaks for wind power in particular beyond the end of 2008, when the tax breaks expire, and there is a dearth of foresight in energy policy in both Congress and the federal government. This is a state of affairs that John McCain has shown no interest in rectifying (his programme so far seems to centre on restarting oil drilling in coastal waters off the Gulf of Mexico), and the details of Barack Obama's prospective energy policy are currently pretty vague.
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Re: Pricey!

Post by tony h » Wed Oct 29, 2008 2:05 am

I must have missed the punchline
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I'm puzzled therefore I think.

Re: Pricey!

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Oct 29, 2008 2:28 am

Well, Tony, you're a bit of a buzz-kill, eh?
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