Pigeons

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Pigeons

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Feb 13, 2006 11:23 am

For marketing reasons, the makers have now dropped the first element, 'Sadder', from the original name of their product.
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Pigeons

Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Feb 13, 2006 12:33 pm

.. Shelley .. thought the idea of eating the pigeons, called squab when they are very young, was best and so found you this recipe for Allegheny Broiled Pigeon .. I understand that the Allegheny River does flow into New York on some part of its journey so it should work with tough New Yorkers ..
Split the pigeons down the back and flatten into butterfly pieces. Dust birds with seasoned flour, brush with beaten egg yolks, and cover with crumbs. Put birds skin down under a 550 degree broiler for 5 minutes. Reduce broiler heat to 400 degrees, turn birds, and cook until done, basting with melted butter. Serve with Pepper Sauce or Poivrade Sauce.
Source: http://fooddownunder.com/cgi-bin/search.cgi?q=squab
.. unfortunately I also found this comment about just how tender pigeons can be ..
The trouble with pigeon is that when it gets beyond the squab stage - and a pigeon can live for a goodly number of years - it definitely is tough. The best solution for an old pigeon is a good strong marinade. Pigeons should marinate for a fair length of time; a young one for 12 to 24 hours, older birds for a couple of days.
..

WoZ of Aus 13/02/06
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Pigeons

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Feb 13, 2006 1:49 pm

Shelley,

I guarantee that pressure cooking will soften even the toughest or most rubbery flesh (works great with octopus). I suggest you experiment with the duration, taking it slow and steady -- you can easily remedy undercooking, but not overcooking.

How did the citrus spray work out?
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Pigeons

Post by Bobinwales » Mon Feb 13, 2006 5:28 pm

If fox and cat urine are difficult to collect, might I have the temerity to suggest trying shellyurine? It would put me off!
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Pigeons

Post by haro » Mon Feb 13, 2006 6:58 pm

Erik, my buddy Yannis in Greece cooks octopus no longer than a minute and a half (in a mixture of milk and water). The result is the most tender meat I've ever eaten. It melts on the tongue. He says, "Twenty seconds too long and it can be used for resoling shoes." Of course, the freshly caught and killed octopus must be treated accordingly too. Greeks do that by forcefully knocking it on a rock or concrete surface at least 60 times, if my memory serves me well, that is. It's hard work. Maybe pressure-cooking would be easier.

Oh, and Greeks also seem to have a special way of cooking not-so-young pigeons to make (or maybe keep) the meat very tender, but I don't know how they do it.
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Pigeons

Post by Shelley » Mon Feb 13, 2006 7:13 pm

Well, I was the victim of a pre-emptive strike by Mother Nature. New York received a glorious two feet of the white stuff over the weekend, so I didn't launch my attack. However, it occurs to me that I can write “13th floor” and “go away, you nasty birds” with the orange stuff ON the white stuff, while producing the illusion of cat and/or fox urine at the same time!
Bobinwales wrote: If fox and cat urine are difficult to collect, might I have the temerity to suggest trying shellyurine? It would put me off!
Bobinwales, you ought to be ashamed of yourself: you mis-spelled my name.

By the way, Quail, thank you very much for the link to the pigeon deterrence people. I have seen the spikes before, and I’m not sure why my building management has chosen the loopy wire instead. (I have a reasonable amount of independence in my measures to battle these pests, but anchoring hardware to the building facade is a management call.) Apparently, they are considering new ways to deal with this problem in a humane way: spikes may be next, or recorded hawk calls, or perhaps the eviction of misguided tenants who feed them.

So, Ken, I took that cog railway up to Pike’s Peak last September. I could see Colorado Springs from up there. In fact I think I saw your house – the one with the redwood siding, right? There was a woodpecker close by, and I think I heard it cursing . . . Say, do you have to re-do the plastic sheeting every few years? Preventing the rascals from roosting or getting any foothold is key, and that’s the idea behind the loopy wire. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work, and the birds just fly over the wire and land on the “floor” of the balcony. Which brings to mind the “chicken wire” solution proposed by aelnamer. For a while I thought about rigging some sort of barrier, but it, like the chicken wire, would only serve as another horizontal foothold (if you can picture it).

So, orange stuff on white stuff, then hit up the neighbors for a little bit of leftover litter box. Or a litter bit of leftover little box, if you prefer. To be continued . . .

P.S. Quail, does it bother you when we talk about the destruction of other members of your species?
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Pigeons

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Feb 14, 2006 10:31 am

Shelley, I am far too much of a gentleman to suggest that ladies produce such stuff, hence the spelling "shelly" which of course has nothing to do with you at all.

I saw some footage of the snow in New York on television, which appartment was yours?
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Pigeons

Post by kagriffy » Tue Feb 14, 2006 6:53 pm

Bob, obviously, Shelley's apartment was the one with snow on the balcony!
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Pigeons

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Feb 14, 2006 10:59 pm

One way or another, that would be yellow snow, I think!
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Pigeons

Post by Bobinwales » Fri Feb 17, 2006 7:54 pm

Come on Shelley, has the snow melted, have you got rid of your feathered-rats yet? Don't keep us in silence.
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Pigeons

Post by Shelley » Wed Feb 22, 2006 7:38 pm

Sorry, Bobinwales. I was chaperoning another trip with a bunch of high school students last weekend, and was unable to check in with wordwizard.
Yes, the snow has melted. Yes, I sprayed the orange oil solution everywhere (killing some ivy in the process, I suspect). And . . . no, the vermin are still with me. One wrinkle in the experiment: my better half went out there and did a thorough cleaning with bleach while I was away. The resulting paucity in patio pigeon population was probably due more to the sudden cleanliness of the habitat than the smell of citrus. They've been returning steadily, though, and this morning I found a cozy couple in its usual spot (which I had saturated with orange oil yesterday). So, Erik Kowal, thank you for the suggestion -- I had high hopes. I'm going to keep up with the citrus spray anyway, until it's gone. I like to see things through.
Next: catp--s.

Follow-up to the pigeon saga: although I fear I may be tempting fate to even say this -- it's been over a week and I haven't seen a pigeon on my terrace since I last wrote. I know they're listening, and I know as soon as they've seen I've become hopeful, they'll come swooping back.
There are several reasons why they may be gone: for example, the weather's too cold (although that's never really stopped them before), they were scared off by the bleach or, maybe -- just maybe they don't like the smell of citrus scented cleaning solution. I've sprayed every three days or so since the snowstorm. So. I may have spoken too soon -- Erik's solution might be THE solution.
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Pigeons

Post by kagriffy » Fri Mar 03, 2006 10:25 pm

While we're on updates, Shelley, our local Snooze Channel (oops, I mean "News Channel") TV station had a FOLLOW-UP report on the pigeon problem at one of the downtown buildings the other night. Once again, they had a reporter talking about the "bird poop" as the camera zoomed in for a close-up (right during the dinner hour--how appetizing!). This time, the building managers have come up with a new plan: they have two employees walking up and down the sidewalk in front of the building banging small pieces of two-by-fours together repeatedly!!!! (And this is "late-breaking news" because . . . ?) One of the employees admitted she gets $9.00 an hour to clap boards together while pacing on the sidewalk! Won't that look good on her resume! I was laughing so hard I almost fell out of my La-Z-Boy!
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Pigeons

Post by Shelley » Sat Mar 04, 2006 1:29 pm

That's extraordinary, kagriffy! How long do you think they plan to keep that up? I understand the idea: to prevent the little bastards from resting, roosting or getting comfortable and right at home in any way. I did learn that it's the night-time roosting that has to be avoided at all costs, because that's when the birds establish their home turf. Management could save the city of Springfield some money by beginning this clap-board process at twilight (and ending around midnight, maybe).
Is $9/hr. a living wage in Springfield?
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Pigeons

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Mar 04, 2006 4:06 pm

Allen and Shelley,

Are you saying that you fail to applaud all this clapping?
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Pigeons

Post by Shelley » Mon Mar 06, 2006 7:02 pm

Ok, I will devote one hand to applaud municipal management clap-trap. Hear it?
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