They're there in their house

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They're there in their house

Post by Archived Topic » Sun Dec 19, 2004 9:27 am

I spat out the spitted kabob. -thank you, Russ Cable
Since I sensed the cents' scents...
Set the set set set!
My peer is on the pier.

Is there a term for the sort of sentence that contains multiple instances of different but related homonyms, homographs, homophones, or the like?

I have exhausted my searching capabilities in the regular suspects(suspectorations...lol). I've no idea what to type for the wonderful search engine provided here to see if this has already been discussed.

Thanks a googol.
Submitted by Eric Lamb (Fenton - U.S.A.)
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They're there in their house

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 19, 2004 9:41 am

Eric, I don't have a term, but I can expand on the example:
There, there now; they're there in their house. There you go! So there


Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
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They're there in their house

Post by Archived Reply » Sun Dec 19, 2004 10:07 am

Eric, So (sew), for ( four, fore) we (whee, wee) here (hear) at Homonyms, Homophones, and Homographs International the question boils down (goose or otherwise) to (two, too) whether (weather, wether), there (they’re, their) is at this time (thyme) a word which (witch) will (bequeath, wish, desire, etc.) make sense (cents, scents) or (ore, oe’r, oar) not (knot) or if it would (wood) even (free from variations, divisible by two, i.e. not odd) be (bee) right (wright, rite) for (four, fore) us to try (tri-) to (two, too) pare (pear, pair) the list (Liszt, tilt to one side) to just (equitable) one (won) or is this but (butt) an idle (idyl, idyll, idol) exercise to tease (tees) us into not (knot) thinking that a rose (rhos, roes, or rows) by any other name is still (a distilling apparatus, without movement, noiseless, . . .) a rose (past tense of rise)!

And so (sew) a Happy New (knew) Year to (two, too) you (u, ewe) too ( two, to) and to (two, too) one (won) and all (awl) a good night (knight)!
______________________

Ken G – December 31, 2004

Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
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