Hinglish

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Hinglish

Post by Archived Topic » Mon Dec 13, 2004 11:41 am

.. to add a little more "legitimate" research to the "might is right" argument of the evolution of the English language I thought the following, taken from ABC Word Watch, is putting things into perspective >>>

Hinglish
David Crystal is a University of Wales professor who's written over 40 books on linguistics - and David Crystal is now predicting that Hinglish could become the most widely spoken and dominant language on the planet. Hinglish is Indian English and comes from the collision of English and Hindi. Already 350 million Indians speak Hinglish - and the population is growing by 3% a year (against 1% in the US and UK). David Crystal said: "with Indians at the forefront of the IT revolution, Hinglish will soon become the most common spoken form globally." Hinglish has a quaint, almost old-fashioned, formality in which people offer "do the needful", police "nab" their man, "miscreants abscond", youths engage in "tomfoolery" and politicians say their opponents speak "balderdash". Hinglish is spiced with Hindi words, like "pukka" for real, "jungli" for uncouth, "chappals" for sandals and "chuddis" for underwear. If David Crystal is right, then a world dominated by Hinglish will certainly be colourful.

.. so move over US English it seems that we will have to refer to Hinglish if we are to use the argument that "most" speakers of English spell/say/understand it this way or that so we are right" ..
WoZ of Aus 01/12/04


Submitted by Wizard of Oz (Newcastle - Australia)
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Hinglish

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 13, 2004 11:54 am

Roll on the day when we can argue about the correct pronounciation of "chuddis" instead of "lingerie".
Ken and I will have to polish up our Sanskrit for real derivations, and we can tie Robert to the front of a cannon if he annoys us (or have I confused something?).
Reply from Phil White (Munich - Germany)
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Hinglish

Post by Archived Reply » Mon Dec 13, 2004 12:07 pm

WOz, I most recently watched a documentary on this blend of mixing English with another language. In Singapore it is called Singlish.Wikipida provides a good illustration of its beginning. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singlish.

In the 70's I lived in Malta and attended an English boarding school. Although we were not allowed to speak in our mother tongues, many students did. When I first heard Maltese being spoken I was amazed. The language consists of 3 other languages, Arabic (North African dialect), Italian (Sicilian) and English. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maltese_language
Ahmed
1st of December,2004
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