Death Anniversary

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Death Anniversary

Post by Stevenloan » Fri Sep 12, 2014 5:53 pm

- Hi there all members! Do you guys have a death anniversary in your country? In my country when someone passes away, their family members or relatives have a party to commemorate the dead person. Is this common in your country? By the way, do I use the sentences below correctly in this situation?

A. Next Friday my family and my relatives are going to have a death anniversary for my grandfather.
B. Next Friday my family and loved ones are having a party to commemorate my granddad's death.

Thanks a lot, guys!

StevenLoan
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Re: Death Anniversary

Post by Bobinwales » Fri Sep 12, 2014 6:23 pm

No Steven, we do not do that.

That is to say that we do not remember the dates of course.
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Re: Death Anniversary

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Sep 12, 2014 10:21 pm

I have to disagree with Bob somewhat. Though there is no general tradition in so-called Anglo-Saxon cultures of ritualized annual commemorations of the dead as public events, many people do still make a point of marking the death of their loved ones privately on the anniversary of their death. There also exists the Christian tradition of the memorial service to commemorate the death of someone who has died, especially when the death was recent. However, such services are not necessarily held on the anniversary of the person's death.

An exception to my comments regarding the commemoration of a death anniversary is sometimes made for notable public figures, or to remember those who have fallen in wars. For instance, in the UK there is Remembrance Day, which falls on November 11 -- the anniversary of the armistice that marked the official end of World War I. It is characterized by organized memorial services and the wearing of paper poppies, symbolic of the blood of those spilled on the battlefields where vast stands of poppies later germinated and blossomed; their seeds had been brought to the surface of the soil by the disturbance from the fighting.

Indeed, remembrances for fallen soldiers are probably the chief example of annual death commemorations in Anglo-Saxon cultures -- though they are generally held to mark collective rather than individual deaths.
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Re: Death Anniversary

Post by Stevenloan » Sat Sep 13, 2014 4:58 am

- Hi there Bobinwales, Erik_Kowal and other members! Thanks very much for your posts. Do I correctly use my two sentences in this situation?

A. Next Friday my family and my relatives are going to have a death anniversary for my grandfather.
B. Next Friday my family and loved ones are having a party to commemorate my granddad's death.

Thanks a lot, guys!

StevenLoan
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Re: Death Anniversary

Post by Wizard of Oz » Sat Sep 13, 2014 5:47 am

.. Steve this is a heavily culturally bound idea .. I know my Greek mate attends an annual lunch held to commemorate the passing of his father and I know that to be common amongst Greek families in Aus .. maybe it's an Orthodox Christian idea ?? .. don't know ..

.. as to your sentences I find it difficult because we don't have a single word .. so I would say >>

A. Next Friday my family and my relatives are going to have a death anniversary for my grandfather. >>> Next Friday my family and my relatives are going to commemorate the anniversary of my grandfather's death/passing.
B. Next Friday my family and loved ones are having a party to commemorate my granddad's death. >>> I prefer this sentence .. and "party' is the right word as it is a celebration of the departed person's life ..

WoZ managing to stay alive .. just ..
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Re: Death Anniversary

Post by Bobinwales » Sat Sep 13, 2014 11:45 am

"There is no general tradition in so-called Anglo-Saxon cultures of ritualized annual commemorations of the dead as public events".
There is no similar tradition in the Celtic cultures either, which is why I said what I did. I assumed that Steven was interested in the "family" celebration (if that is the word). We do not have parties to remember the death of a loved one.

For instance, my sister and I have different mothers. My father was a widower when he married his second wife and produced my half-sister. My mother's anniversary passes with only me remembering, but since our father died my sister and I have gone for dinner and a drink on his anniversary. No-one else comes with us, it is a private thing between the two of us. The mere thought of a party would be an anathema to us.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
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Re: Death Anniversary

Post by Stevenloan » Sun Sep 14, 2014 3:13 am

- WoZ! Thank you very much for your correction. Bobinwales and Erik_Kowal! Thanks again for your posts.

StevenLoan
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