A Caramel Cake? / flan

If you feel that your question or comment doesn't fit into the categories above, feel free to post it here.
Post Reply

A Caramel Cake? / flan

Post by Stevenloan » Tue Nov 19, 2013 2:33 pm

- What do you guys call this kind of cake? It's made of caramel. Is it a "caramel cake"? Here's the picture : http://www.google.com.vn/imgres?imgurl= ... KsBEP4dMA0

Thanks so much in advance!

StevenLoan
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: A Caramel Cake?

Post by trolley » Tue Nov 19, 2013 4:39 pm

Hi Steve, that looks like a carmel custard. A "cake" is usually made with flour and has a bit of a spongy, bread-like texture. Custard is made from milk and eggs.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: A Caramel Cake?

Post by Bobinwales » Tue Nov 19, 2013 7:50 pm

We would use the French, Crème Caramel.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: A Caramel Cake?

Post by zmjezhd » Tue Nov 19, 2013 9:50 pm

Here on the Left Coast of the States, we tend to call it flan.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: A Caramel Cake?

Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue Nov 19, 2013 11:37 pm

aaa
Steve, It’s a form of caramel-coated custard (neither cake nor pie) or, as per trolley, caramel custard. Or, as per Bob, the fancy-sounding crème caramel, neither of which names I am familiar with. Out my way we call it the even fancier-sounding crème brûlée, which is a popular high-end-restaurant dessert.

In surfing the web, I found that although the basic ‘crème caramel’ (or flan, as per zmjezhd) looks like the basic ‘crème brulée,’ and they are similar, there are differences in ingredients and preparation, and thus in taste and texture (see here). And for the basics and beyond, with more images than you can shake a stick at, see here and click on the images for details.
______________________

Ken – November 19, 2013
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: A Caramel Cake?

Post by Bobinwales » Wed Nov 20, 2013 1:13 pm

Interesting Ken, THIS is what I know as a Crème Brûlée. It is always served in a ramekin.

Meaning no offence whatsoever, is this another example of US English using names for things that the originators call something else? 'Muffins', 'French Fries' etc?
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: A Caramel Cake?

Post by Wizard of Oz » Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:45 am

.. distinguished wizards, surely this is a no-brainer .. the dessert is clearly labelled as being a cream caramel or as Bob correctly identifies a Crème Caramel .. this dessert is made upside down with the caramel being placed in the mould first and the custard being placed on top .. when the dessert is turned out the caramel is on the top .. it is not a Crème Brûlée as that dessert remains in the mould so that the toffee topping can be burned into place to be cracked to reveal the custard beneath .. it is not a flan as it does not have a case .. simple gastronomy regardless of country ..

.. so Stephen it is as it says on the picture .. a Crème Caramel if you wish to be fancy or a simple cream caramel .. this dessert implies the caramel sauce ..

WoZ who loves his food
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

Re: A Caramel Cake?

Post by Stevenloan » Thu Nov 21, 2013 5:26 pm

- Thank you very much, you guys. I really appreciate your help.

StevenLoan
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: A Caramel Cake?

Post by zmjezhd » Fri Nov 22, 2013 12:07 am

it is not a flan as it does not have a case

This is is perhaps case of UK English diverging from the French and Spanish flans. The item shown in the opening post is called flan here in the western portion of the USA. See the Wikipedia article.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: A Caramel Cake?

Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Nov 22, 2013 3:24 am

Zmjezhd's account is corroborated by my copy of the Oxford Concise Spanish Dictionary (it's actually Spanish-English and English-Spanish), which gives crème caramel as the (British) English (as it were) equivalent.

Along the same but different lines, my Collins Robert French Dictionary [French-English and English-French] gives custard tart: the same insofar as a crème caramel and a custard tart both contain custard, but different inasmuch as a tart is a pastry case with a filling of something sweet, whereas a crème caramel is pastryless.

Both dictionaries also mention a secondary meaning of flan in their respective languages, namely 'mould'. It occurs to me that a mould can be used to form desserts both with and without a crust or case. Different culinary traditions may therefore explain the divergent connotations of flan in French and Spanish compared with English.

Wikipedia's disambiguation page for 'flan' (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flan_(disambiguation) ) lists the following possibilities:
- Crème caramel or Flan de leche, especially in Spanish-speaking areas and in the United States
- Flan, a kind of sweet or savoury pie in English cuisine
- Quiche, a kind of savoury pie with custard filling in French cuisine
- Flan or planchet, a blank metal disk to be struck as a coin
Incidentally, Wikipedia's description of the etymology of 'flan' (stated to be taken from the 1989 edition of the Oxford English Dictionary -- see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flan ) says:
The English word "flan" and the earlier forms "flaune" and "flawn" come from Old French flaon (modern French flan), in turn from early Medieval Latin fladōn-em, derived from Old High German flado, a sort of flat cake, probably from an Indo-European root for "flat" or "broad".[2]
(I'm looking forward to the ensuing discussion about what exactly a tart consists of...)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: A Caramel Cake? / flan

Post by Bobinwales » Fri Nov 22, 2013 11:13 pm

My Hering's Dictionary of Classical and Modern Cookery gives the English word 'Flan' as:

Flan large open tart or pie with a base and fluted border, baked in hoops either empty or filled with fresh fruit and baked with the fruit, sometimes covered with custard or glazed with thick syrup made of the fruit skins etc. Or with strained apricot jam. The bottom of the paste, sugar or short pastry, must be pricked to prevent blistering.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: A Caramel Cake? / flan

Post by zmjezhd » Sat Nov 23, 2013 5:19 pm

What the British call flan, I would call a custard tart. What they call crème caramel, I would call flan. Flan, where I live, is a common dessert menu choice in many Mexican restaurants. The only places I've had custard tarts is at dim sum restaurants and Chinese bakeries.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: A Caramel Cake? / flan

Post by Bobinwales » Sun Nov 24, 2013 4:02 pm

May I refer you to my earlier post Zmjezhd?

What is a muffin in the US is not a muffin in the UK (although I have to say American muffins have now infiltrated into UKEnglish to an amazing extent), French fries are not how the French fry potatoes.

THIS is a custard tart. More usually they are individual tarts for consumption with a cup of tea.
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: A Caramel Cake? / flan

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sun Nov 24, 2013 9:38 pm

It's clear by now that the same terms are used to describe rather different types or styles of food around the world; for instance, in that part of the American Midwest I now live in, a pie never contains meat -- whereas in Britain, if you ordered pie and chips you would probably be rather dismayed to discover the pie contained a filling of apple instead of beef. (But confusingly, pizzas are sometimes referred to here as 'pizza pies' -- I seem to recall we previously discussed that term here.)

For what it's worth, Bob, I still think of what you're thinking of when I hear the term 'custard tart'. But I'd be intrigued to try one from Zmjezhd's Chinese bakery. :-)
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS

Re: A Caramel Cake? / flan

Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Nov 25, 2013 7:07 am

.. Erik & Bob I noticed the following in the wikipedia article >>
An imitation of crème caramel may be prepared from "instant flan powder", which is thickened with agar or carrageenan rather than eggs.
.. there's that bloody seaweed again ..

.. the following is also from the article and refers specifically to Vietnam >>
Crème caramel was introduced by the French and has been common in Vietnam. It is known as bánh caramel, caramen or kem caramel in northern Vietnam or bánh flan or kem flan in southern Vietnam. Sometimes black coffee can be poured on top when served, giving the dish a new tone and distinctive flavour.
.. I wonder how long the word flan has been used as a cooking term in South Vietnam for this dessert ?? .. how about as long as the American cultural imposition of the Vietnam war ?? .. I wonder ..

WoZ who loves a custard tart
ACCESS_POST_ACTIONS
Signature: "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things."

ACCESS_END_OF_TOPIC
Post Reply