Irritating expressions or worse

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Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by Ken Greenwald » Wed Oct 09, 2013 5:24 am

aaa
Erik, That’s a good question, which a checkout care person at the pet store once asked me. And the answer is I’d rather take the cans home in my own cloth grocery bag than fill up my recycle bin with the boxes. There is a method to my madness. (<;)
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Ken – October 8, 2013
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Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by trolley » Wed Oct 09, 2013 6:59 am

I'd bet that your customer care executive would be awed to hear the recycling angle, as well. My daughter thought that my mac and cheese dish the other night was "awesome". What are these kids going to say when something big happens?
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Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Oct 09, 2013 9:50 am

"That's super-awesome!"
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Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by Bobinwales » Wed Oct 09, 2013 10:21 am

Sorry John, what is a "mac and cheese dish"?
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by trolley » Wed Oct 09, 2013 4:29 pm

That's macaroni and cheese sauce, Bob. I have to say, it was pretty good but when I think "awesome", I think of wonderment and fear. It's something that dwarfs you with its terrible greatness. It wasn't quite that good.
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Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by Bobinwales » Wed Oct 09, 2013 5:01 pm

That's made me feel pretty silly John! I thought you meant a pottery thing to put cheese in!
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
Bob in Wales

Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by Erik_Kowal » Thu Oct 10, 2013 3:29 am

trolley wrote:That's macaroni and cheese sauce, Bob.
If it's home-made from high-quality ingredients, I suppose it could be good. However, I've also encountered it as a packet meal; and in that form, no blander, slimier, more vomit-provoking dish exists on the face of the earth. Even okra is not quite that disgusting.

This makes it all the more remarkable, in my opinion, that for many years macaroni and cheese from a packet was almost the only cooked food my nephew was willing to eat. Thankfully he has now grown out of that phase.
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Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue Oct 22, 2013 10:15 pm

aaa
NEUTRALIZE:

In an article appearing in yesterday’s USAToday.com ( October 21, 2013), the following was reported:
The Reno Gazette-Journal, citing Sparks City Manager Shawn Carey, said the shooter was killed by a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

“We believe the suspect has been neutralized,” the Sparks Police Department said on its website, without further details.”
Police personnel should be very circumspect in what they say, and stick to speaking official policepersonese lest they say something prematurely or offend someone’s sensibilities.

Consider “We believe the suspect has been neutralized.”

1) Not bad, but should have said, “The alleged neutralizee (more loosely, the perpetrator, and much more loosely, the suspect) has allegedly been neutralized.” Neutralization is not a true fact until it has been officially determined.

2) “Also, “has been neutralized” gives the impression that the neutralizee has been neutralized by a neutralizer (see #4 below) when, in fact, it is also possible that the neutralizee committed an act of self-neutralization. If it was officially known that the nuetralizee was, in fact, neutralized by a policeperson, it would not have been improper for the police spokesperson to have said, “The neutralizee has been neutralized by a policeperson.”

3) It must be kept in mind that neutralization and self-neutralization do not necessarily mean the suspension of life of the neutralizee and it could just as easily mean that he or she (to be determined by examination by official medical personnel) was disarmed by a neutralizer or disarmed himself or herself of his or her neutralizer (see #4 below). So, until it is determined which is the case, the police spokesperson’s statement was mostly correct and proper (except for the somewhat sloppy use of the word “suspect”) in using his or her above terminology.

4) And, not addressed is the question of the weapon (also preferably called the “neutralizer,” not to be confused with “neutralizer,” the person) used by the alleged neutralizer. However, according to accepted police policy it is correct and proper not to jump to conclusions until an autopsy has been performed (see #1). For if it was determined to be an act of self-neutralization, the possibility that the alleged perpetrator could have used a knife, rope, cyanide capsule, plastic bag, bazooka, etc. could not be discounted. But, of course the possibility also exists (see #2) that the neutralization was performed by an external agent (a neutralizer), so that the police spokesperson’s statement was correct in not mentioning this point until all the alleged, true facts had been officially determined.
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Ken – October 22, 2013 (remaining neutral)
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Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:21 pm

I suppose we must wait until the neutralizee's neutralization certificate has been issued before we can be definitively certain of the cause of his neutralization.
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Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by trolley » Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:52 pm

I think we can rule out drowning as the cause of his neutralization. I'm pretty sure they would have claimed he'd been liquidated.
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Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue Nov 24, 2015 11:44 pm

aaa
This is such a worn out cliché that I can’t believe that any respectable novelist would use it:
<1983 “Somewhere far away a dog was barking.”—The Queen’s Gambit by Walter Tevis, page 158>
However, see here for a short article on this very subject and it's use by many creditable authors.
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Ken – November 24, 2015
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Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by trolley » Wed Nov 25, 2015 1:26 am

Sometimes, a train whistle blows or a coyote howls, but no one ever mentions a duck quacking.
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Re: Irritating expressions or worse

Post by BonnieL » Wed Nov 25, 2015 4:53 am

[quote="trolley"]Sometimes, a train whistle blows or a coyote howls, but no one ever mentions a duck quacking.[/quote]

Pat McManus uses variations such as, "somewhere in the distance, an ant coughed." Of course, he writes humor.

I'm glad this thread was revived; I've had fun reading it. But no one mentioned my most hated phrase: "it remains to be seen." That should be obvious.
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