Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by christinecornwall » Sat Jul 10, 2010 3:49 am

are non-Americans so ill-informed about your country that they have no basis to pass judgment, even when they are affected by the decisions made there?
I am guessing by your reply that you missed the spirit of my message. I would never call you, (your intellegence and wealth of information are certainly impressive) ill-informed. I was saying your comments were harsh. Perhaps your skin could use some thickening as well? Say what you will about Americans, you have the right. I respect your opinion, and reluctantly agree with it. To throw another analogy into the pile, let's say someone has a child who is a brat. That mother would gladly go on about how bratty her child is, but would not allow another mother to do it. Although I appear to be alone in the woods on this, I am sure there are other people who could at least understand where I am coming from. I never argued the veracity of your comment, just the spirit of it. Say what you will about Americans, America or whatever other nation and its people you wish. My message is falling on deaf ears so you'll hear no more from me.
ChristineinCornwall
Holding for applause
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by christinecornwall » Sat Jul 10, 2010 5:41 am

Now you are claiming you were referring to 'the residents here'. So what exactly are you trying to say? Or are you still making up your mind because you haven't yet decided which claim not to supply any evidence for?

You failed to provide evidence for your 'baseless' claim that Americans are 'rampantly egoistic.' That being said, a few Liberals in this country love to go around in their self-loathing manner and bash Americans all over the show. Some Liberals advocate creating programs (cradle to grave entitlement programs) where its citizens feel entitled or owed things they never paid into! I am not suggesting we not feed, clothe and house our needy, however, the jails could be a lot less comfy and nobody should scream for a three bedroom apartment on the governmente dime because they chose to have x amount of children! If you would like me to list the programs I could certainly try to scratch the surface. Many American politicians will go around apologizing to aggressive, fascist heads of states and leaders. This makes others feel welcomed to jump on the bandwagon and demonize Americans, similarly to what your statement reflects. To respond to your first question; Aren't you (my emphasis) a resident here? Didn't you claim entitlement?
if I may say so: a little insincerity helps to lubricate the interactions between us as individuals and as collective entities, and to some extent sets the tone for what may happen next......some softening of the edges in our dealings with each other is particularly desirable.

After rereading this thread, I realized you have already stated, so eloquently, minus the stab, my point exactly!!
Last edited by christinecornwall on Sat Jul 10, 2010 5:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:51 am

If I decided to have a discussion with my dining-room table, I'd get a lot more sense from it than I've been getting from you.

It appears that you actually agree ("I respect your opinion, and reluctantly agree with it") with my comment about the rampant egocentricity that prevails in America -- which you then illustrated perfectly with a remarkable display of wounded amour propre and irrelevant ranting about 'Liberals' -- but that you object to my making my comment because I'm only a naturalized citizen, not a citizen by birth. Where is the logic in that? Is there an actual principle you are defending beyond the egocentricity embodied in "Shut up, you're pissing me off because you haven't lived in the States long enough to be allowed to express an opinion concerning Americans or America"?

I'm, uh, "sorry", I can't take your arguments seriously because you can't make a serious argument.
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by christinecornwall » Sat Jul 10, 2010 4:43 pm

I too will converse with the furniture henceforth!
Is there an actual principle you are defending beyond the egocentricity embodied in "Shut up, you're pissing me off because you haven't lived in the States long enough to be allowed to express an opinion concerning Americans or America"?
I never suggested that I was pissed, or asked you to shut up. I never stated nor implied you were not allowed to speak your mind. I am also allowed to speak mine. I tried to provide a polite reminder that it is insensitive to make general blanket statements about whole populations. You have exemplified egocentrity muchto better than I did. Stomping upon the feelings of others, without so much as an attempt to soften it, is as egocentric as it gets. I know....touchyfeelysweety.com is thataway right?
I no longer expect you to understand. I have tried to give you several basic analogies which illustrate my point that making negative blanket statements about entire populations of people, is lacking in tact or taste (qualities which may or may not mean much to you) regardless of the truth behind them. If you were chatting with a friend about your wife, you might say a negative thing about her. The listener would do well not to add any insulting details about your wife, if he or she has any couth. I personally would not make a general comment about people from the UK. Although stereotypes are many, I wouldn't repeat them. It is harsh and pointless, much like this conversation has turned. Again, I don't know why I'm trying to reillustrate this point that is obviously falling on deaf ears.
I'm, uh, "sorry", I can't take your arguments seriously because you can't make a serious argument.

Again, your words are illustrating my point exactly!! Can we agree to disagree?
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by trolley » Sat Jul 10, 2010 9:30 pm

"Can we agree to disagree?"

...totally off topic:
I think from now on , I'm going to start "disagreeing to agree". That seems much easier and you don't even need the other guy's cooperation.
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Jul 10, 2010 10:59 pm

Indeed. I'm disagreeing to agree to disagree with Christine.
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by christinecornwall » Mon Jul 12, 2010 12:21 am

Indeed. I'm disagreeing to agree to disagree with Christine.
Loose translation: Nanny Nanny POO POO
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by Erik_Kowal » Mon Jul 12, 2010 1:56 am

Yes, that's the level I suspected you'd been aiming for all along.
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by christinecornwall » Mon Jul 12, 2010 4:32 pm

Indeed. I'm disagreeing to agree to disagree with Christine.
The above post, I was trying to point out, is the schoolyard equivalent to 'nanny nanny poo poo.' I tried to end it by asking if we could put this aside and agree to disagree and I got a 'NO, I disagree" by you. There are far too many thinks to think upon these days to continue with this ridiculous exchange. Now if you'll pardon me, I have a chifforobe on the other line. ;)
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by Wizard of Oz » Tue Jul 13, 2010 8:41 am

.. ah do declare Missy Christine is that a magnolia blossom in your hair?? .. and here was I just thinking that as a lad I only had a lowboy .. but now I have come to realise two things .. what our family called a lowboy in deed wasn't and what did have we had never heard the name of .. my father had a bigger version than mine .. *grin* .. he had more clothes .. Oh Missy Chrissy what was you a thinkin of ?? .. so if this word is confined to the Southern USA what is this piece of furniture called elsewhere ?? ..

WoZ coming out of the chifforobe
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by christinecornwall » Tue Jul 13, 2010 9:29 pm

I am currently in the middle of "To kill a mockingbird" where the chifforobe serves a significant role. Although in my family in the Northeastern US, we call it a chifforobe regularly, however equally as often we call it an armoire. Is your 'lowboy' the Welch equivalent to the English 'chest of drawers' which is a 'dresser' in our neck of the woods? I looked at an illustration of a lowboy on merriem and it didn't appear useful for clothing, but would look more fitting as a side table in the dining room.
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by Bobinwales » Wed Jul 14, 2010 3:48 pm

I have never come across “Low boy” before Christine, whatever it is it certainly isn’t Welsh. I found THIS SITE which shows what they look like, and I can tell you, I don’t have one!

I do have a tallboy however, there is one pictured HERE.

Gdwdwkr, how we miss you.
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Signature: All those years gone to waist!
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by trolley » Wed Jul 14, 2010 5:36 pm

I thought that a lowboy was the bottom section of a highboy. A highboy was a two part bureau (dresser, chest of drawers). The bottom section was a little wider than the hutch part and depending on on the configuration of the drawers they were known as a "five over three" or a "six over two", etc. If you didn't put the top set of drawers on it was a lowboy and looked a little like a side board or buffet.
You're right, Bob. This would be the perfect time for James to chime in.
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by christinecornwall » Thu Jul 15, 2010 1:50 am

http://www.merriam-webster.com/art/dict/highboy.htm
I have a highboy similar to the one pictured (two over three), although I never referred to it as such. We just refer to this type of furniture as dresser or bureau.
Bob, I did not intend to generalise (my final letter 'sed' is broken on this keyboard) about 'Welch' furniture buying, using or naming habits, I just followed WoS's (really got to repair this keyboard) lead. ;)
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Re: Should I really care if they are "sorry"?

Post by Wizard of Oz » Thu Jul 15, 2010 1:18 pm

.. aha, hasn't this opened up a can of worms .. what it has done is to allow me to sort out my furniture problems .. if you go and look at this lowboy from the 1920/30s I can understand why our family called mine and my father's wardrobes, lowboys .. and if I look in the Macquarie IV I find ..
lowboy noun 1.a piece of furniture for holding clothes, similar to a wardrobe, but not so tall
.. and in the Aus Oxford ..
lowboy n 1. a low wardrobe.
.. but somewhere between the 1930s and now the word, in Australia, has acquired another meaning which has changed dramatically what is meant in furniture terms as a lowboy .. if you google for a lowboy in Aussie furniture catalogues now you will find a chest of drawers up to 4 drawers high .. 5 to 8 drawers high is called a tallboy .. so just pick up your clothes and put the washing away !! ..

WoZ going back into the lowboy
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