apostrophe

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apostrophe

Post by trolley » Thu Dec 28, 2006 10:26 pm

Hey Folks
I was hoping somebody could help settle a dispute for me. Is dropping the "g" from the end of a word considered an acceptable one word contraction? If it is, where would the apostrophe be placed? I have always understood that the apostrophe replaced (and ocurred in the same position as)the missing letter(s). I would spell camping as campin' but my wife (who was proven correct by Spell Check)spells it camp'in. Does this mean I ain't been thinkin' right all these years? Why,on Earth, would the apostrophe go between the P and the I?
Just Wonderin'....wonder'in........wondering,
Trolley
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Post by kagriffy » Thu Dec 28, 2006 11:09 pm

I wouldn't go so far as to say your wife was PROVEN CORRECT by Spell Check. It's been my experience that most Spell Checks don't really recognize the apostrophe (except in very common contractions, such as "don't" or "won't"). My guess is that it looked at "Camp'in" and saw it as two words separated by the apostrophe. Since both "camp" and "in" are correctly spelled words, the Spell Check does not tag this instance as a misspelled word.

As far as I know, the correct place for the apostrophe in your examples is after the "n": (campin' or wonderin').
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K. Allen Griffy
Springfield, Illinois (USA)

apostrophe

Post by trolley » Thu Dec 28, 2006 11:21 pm

Thanks Kathy
If you type campin' in a Word Doc it is identified as an incorrectly spelled word and offers camping or camp'in as alternates.
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Post by trolley » Thu Dec 28, 2006 11:36 pm

sorry.....not sure where I got "Kathy" from.
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Fri Dec 29, 2006 12:08 am

Where an apostrophe marks a dropped terminal G (as in "campin' "), the most common purpose is to show the word being pronounced in an informal context (e.g. in dialectal forms of English or in time-worn usages such as "huntin', shootin' and fishin' ").

Words altered in this way are not quite Standard English, and hence are not included in the vast majority of spellcheck dictionaries. I would also contend that the usefulness of a spellcheck routine would be considerably lessened if they were, because most written English is purposely more formal in tone than most spoken English.
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apostrophe

Post by zmjezhd » Fri Dec 29, 2006 2:21 am

While an apostrophe marks a dropped g in the written language (g-dropping), it is interesting to note that what is actually happening phonologically is the replacement of one phoneme (a velar nasal) with another (an alveolar nasal) in word final position. This was a common enough allophonic variation in different English dialects. It is also affected by the coalescence (ng-coalescence) of two distinct nominal verbal endings -inde (present particple) and -inge (the gerund) in Old English.

[Corrected typo.]
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Post by Wizard of Oz » Fri Dec 29, 2006 4:27 am

.. Jim thank you for that .. I will in future watch my velar nasals so that I continue to sound posh ..

WoZ
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apostrophe

Post by gdwdwrkr » Fri Dec 29, 2006 10:15 am

This thread-title was my ouster in the Jr. High spelling bee. Ouch. Pain being a good teacher, I will never again end it with a Y!

Mrs. Trolley is off-track
Never had a backpack
On her back
Never sang "Valeree"
While out stampin'
Still, you'd think
She could spell campin'
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Post by trolley » Fri Dec 29, 2006 6:14 pm

Thanks for your input,however,anyone who is married must surely appreciate the fact that I cannot win this arguement by reproducing these posts as evidence. Alveolar nasal? Unfortunately,my Grade School teacher,Mr. Bowen ( God rest his soul ), has been unavailable for comment for about thirty years now. I am too informal to go camping. May I go campin'? If my wife (with Bill Gates' blessing) is going camp'in, where is she ( or possibly they ) going? Maybe I should just give up and go drinkin'.
Trolley
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apostrophe

Post by gdwdwrkr » Fri Dec 29, 2006 6:44 pm

Just so you tell Mrs. Trolley you were drink'in.
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apostrophe

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Sat Jan 06, 2007 6:25 pm

Tell her you were apostrophi'sn.
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apostrophe

Post by Edwin Ashworth » Sat Jan 06, 2007 6:26 pm

Apostrophis'n.
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Post by Edwin Ashworth » Sat Jan 06, 2007 6:28 pm

A'postrophisin.
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Post by Edwin Ashworth » Sat Jan 06, 2007 6:29 pm

Drink'in.
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Sat Jan 06, 2007 6:45 pm

All this drink'in' will be the urination of us all.
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