galleting

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galleting

Post by gdwdwrkr » Fri Jun 30, 2006 2:34 pm

http://www.nhbg.fsnet.co.uk/flinthart.htm
I know of examples on St. Thomas, VI and have seen a reference to it in Annapolis MD in an old The Magazine Antiques.
Any "local" examples in far-flung places?
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galleting

Post by tony h » Sat Jul 08, 2006 10:09 pm

"any examples" do you mean: of the use of the word or of the use of the technique?

http://www.trp.dundee.ac.uk/research/gl ... ypics.html
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galleting

Post by gdwdwrkr » Sat Jul 08, 2006 11:19 pm

Beautiful link . I mean both. I had never heard the term, and had never seen any of it around here. I'm thinking it is an English practice, so shows up all over the "Empire".
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galleting

Post by tony h » Sun Jul 09, 2006 6:13 am

I would guess (emphasise the guess) that it is Norman French. You only get "modern" stone buildings in England after the arrival of William the Bastard in 1066. In either form Galleting or Galloting I would tend to think there must have ben a French craftsman who came up with (or introduced ) the technique. Gallet and Gallot are common French surnames. I don't know if the names mean anything particular in French.
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galleting

Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Jul 12, 2006 3:50 pm

This would dress up a nice breezeblock wall, no?
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galleting

Post by haro » Wed Jul 12, 2006 9:54 pm

Tony, in French, 'un galet' is a pebble. The word can have some other meanings too, like, for instance, one of several metal slips or discs or the like mounted at the bottom of a heavy object to make it slide more easily on a surface.

'Galet' is the modern spelling according to Le Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française. It may have been 'gallet' centuries ago, when spelling was a matter of personal preference rather than standards. So there may be a connection.
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galleting

Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Jul 12, 2006 10:38 pm

Those furniture glides have been marketed here as "Domes of Silence."
http://www.fisco-fasteners.co.uk/UphGlides.htm

http://cgi.ebay.com/Domes-Of-Silence-Vi ... dZViewItem
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galleting

Post by daverba » Thu Jul 13, 2006 3:02 am

https://www.elderhostel.org/Programs/se ... 26+Gardens
says----
"...see 'galleting' -- an architectural feature found only in Annapolis and Norfolk, England."

http://www.feltwell.org/feltwell2/written/notes2.htm
says----
"Galleting ... may be seen at Swaffham, Narborough, Beechamwell, Gooderstone, Northwold, Methwold, ... Gooderstone ... Northwold ... and Feltwell."

These sound like places in England - or JRR Tolkien's imagination - or both.

http://www.masonryinstitute.com/guide/g ... _ghij.html
says----
GALLETING. Insertion of chips or spalls of stone into the joints of rough masonry to solidify the wall, reduce the amount of mortar required, or add detail to the appearance. Also called garretting.

http://72.14.209.104/search?q=cache:94F ... clnk&cd=92
says----
Wide joints should be pinned with matching stone pieces to avoid over-wide mortar joints. Some walling incorporates pinnings, (also known as pin stanes, galleting or cherry-cocking). Such features should be accurately reproduced, particularly if they are part of the decorative element of the wall.

Cherry-cocking = cherry caulking ?? (although some of us will have fun with this phrase).

http://www.trp.dundee.ac.uk/research/gl ... allet.html
says----
Gallet - (galleting, garnetting or garreting)
Chip or spalls of stone, brick etc pressed into mortar joint. Garnetting or garreting are two regional variations (Galet is French for a small river washed pebble). Can be decorative but purpose is primarilly to reduce amount of mortar required, and hence the possibility of shrinkage, prior to the wall being rendered. Cherry cocking is essentially the same process, but the stones are inserted in a more even and regular pattern to achieve a decorative effect


See also:
http://www.blackisle.org/cherrycaulking.htm
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galleting

Post by tony h » Thu Jul 13, 2006 9:15 am

Cheers Haro.

I am puzzeled by
but purpose is primarilly to reduce amount of mortar required, and hence the possibility of shrinkage
because (the only time I have seen behind the facade) theGalleting is only on the surface. Behind the surface the mortar can be just as thick (or thicker). It would seem to me more likely that it served to reduce the erosion of the mortar by the weather.
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galleting

Post by gdwdwrkr » Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:01 am

Dave...the first is not correct..if only because of the examples on St. Thomas
Tony...is it possible it is purely decorative?

from Dave's second entry:

In his book on the Brecklands, W. G. Clarke says that Galleting, i.e., insertion of pellets in the mortar joints, may be seen at Swaffham, Narborough, Beechamwell, Gooderstone, Northwold, Methwold, and Feltwell. Red-brick, tile and flint-chips are used at Gooderstone; cinders at Northwold; red-brick, cinders, quartzite pebbles, flint-flakes and carrstone pellets at Feltwell. Galleting is done partly to prevent the pointing from weathering and partly to add to the beauty of the building.
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