Segway [segue -- Forum Admin.]

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Segway [segue -- Forum Admin.]

Post by nubble363 » Thu Apr 06, 2006 4:16 pm

I am new to this and I hope you don't mind me jumping in and asking for help...
I am looking for the word I heard used by a tv anchor person used when he was going from one news story to another...something like "segway?" can you help

Posted - 17 Jan 2007 : 09:41:44
I keep hearing this word on the TV. It seems to mean 'link', as when a news reporter links from one topic to the next.
I don't even know if this is how it's spelt, I've never seen it written. Searching around just finds that bizarre electric two-wheeled cart thing.
Anyway, can anyone enlighten me about this word? I'm afraid it grates horribly on my English ears when I hear it.

racyrich
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Post by Bobinwales » Thu Apr 06, 2006 4:36 pm

Isn't a Segway one of those peculiar machines shaped like a king-sized old-fashioned cylinder lawn-mower, on which you stand and belt off in all directions without apparently falling off?
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Post by kagriffy » Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:46 pm

Yes, Bob, the Segway scooter does look exactly as you described. (I would love to try one, but I'm not about to shell out that much money for something so impractical!)

However, I believe the word nubble is looking for is "segue," which is pronounced "SEG-way." My dictionary defines it as "an immediate transition from one part to another, as in music."
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Post by nubble363 » Thu Apr 06, 2006 6:39 pm

thank you kagriffy..that is exactly what I am looking for
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Thu Apr 06, 2006 9:01 pm

Joni, As Allen pointed out SEGUE, which is pronounced ‘segway,’ is the word you are looking for. However, I would like to add, for those who are interested, a few more tidbits.

It was first used as a verb in music (1740) to describe “a transition directly from one section or theme to another” and that was the only sense, as far as I can tell, in which it was used for more than two centuries. However, up until the 1950s or so it was only used as a serious musicological term. After that it began also to be used in music, as the OED puts it, as ‘slang’:
<“Of a person or music: to move without interruption from one song or melody to another.”>
But I doubt that anyone would consider it slang today even though the OED lists it in this sense as such (see 1958 quote). And it wasn’t until very recently (earliest example I could find was from 1972) that it went outside of music and took on the more general meaning of moving smoothly and unhesitatingly from one state, activity, topic, condition, situation, scene, part, or element to another.” A modern synonym would be ‘transition,’ which itself was ‘verbized’ in 1975. And as a noun SEQUE describes any such smooth transition from one thing to another. [From Italian, there follows, third-person singular, present tense of 'seguire,’ to follow, from Vulgar Latin ‘sequere,’ from Latin ‘sequ.’]

I actually recall the first time I heard what at the time was considered the vesry IN word SEGUE. It was in the late 1970s while I was in graduate school and my thesis advisor was prepping me for a talk I was to give at a physics conference. So he tells me that at a certain point I should SEGUE from one topic to another. I knew what he meant from the context, but I had never heard the word before. So I went back to my apartment and was hunting through dictionaries to find it. The odd spelling didn’t help much and I guess I eventually asked someone who put me on the right track.

Before famed inventor Dean Kamen unveiled his ‘Human Transporter’ in 2001, there was tremendous speculation in the media about what it was and what it would be called, and in the buildup to its introduction it even received a code name – ‘Ginger.’ The invention was to be a great advance that would affect humankind for generations to come. Many speculated that he had perfected some revolutionary new type of superefficent engine. When it was revealed what his invention actually was – the Segway (a play on ‘segue’ – a smooth way to get from one place to another) as described by Allen and Bob above, many were sorely disappointed. However, in my humble opinion it really was a great invention that will become a common form of transportation for generations to come. The problem with it right now is mainly price – about $5000. As the price falls to that of a decent bicycle, I think they will eventually be just as ubiquitous.
<1740 “SEGUE, it follows, or comes after; this word is often found before aria, alleluja, amen”—‘A Musical Dictionary’ by J. Grassineau, page 214>

<1958 “Then, without stopping, the guitarist and Ellington SEGUED into Body and soul.”—‘Decca Book of Jazz’ by D. Halperin, xx. page 250>

<1962 “The Haydn selection reached the oboe part—melody SEGUED and started to build.”—‘The Damned and the Destroyed’ (1966) by K, Orvis, iii. page 26>

<1972 “The crowds . . . let up a roar which soon SEGUED into a mixture of cheers, jeers, jests, gibes.”—‘Burning Sappho’ by G. Baxt, v. page 78>

<1976 “The organist . . . SEGUED resonantly from ‘In the Garden’ to ‘Rock of Ages.’—“Muir’s Blood” (1978) by C. Larson, xxv. page 135>

<1978 “How do the world's most celebrated adolescents [sc. the Rolling Stones] SEGUE into middle age?”—‘Illustrated New Musical Express Encyclopedia of Rock’ by Logan & Wolffinden, page 199/1>

<1996 “The trick is to get into enough minds the idea that a movie to see is coming. If this is done inexpensively, Hollywood will SEGUE from red to green. ‘Time Magazine,’ 26 August>

<2006 “How did you SEGUE from TV to film?”— ‘Time Magazine,’ 3 April>
(Oxford English Dictionary, American Heritage Dictionary, Merriam-Webster’s and Random House Unabridged Dictionaries)
___________________

Ken G – April 6, 2006
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Post by tony h » Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:12 pm

The opposite is found more commonly as non-sequitur.
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Post by Shelley » Fri Apr 07, 2006 12:00 pm

Ho, ho, tony h!
The first time I heard this was in the context of making movies, describing the transition (smoothly or not) from one scene to the next. Does it have to be a seamless transition (as in "seque"?)
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Post by tony h » Fri Apr 07, 2006 1:01 pm

sequence, sequal, consequence, resequence, obsequious all have their Latin following
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Post by tony h » Wed Apr 12, 2006 11:05 am

could have posted this here or vier.

Thought this might amuse. I mentioned this subject to my wife who remarked on her surprise at an incident. She had gone into the medical records department at the hospital when she overheard :
Person 1, reading from medical notes, "and numbness in the fingers"
Person 2, "is it sex?"
Person 1 "probably"

The sex here was a contraction of sequalia used to indicate that a medical condition naturalyy follows from a previous condition. In this circumstance the numb fingers followed on from diabetes.
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Post by gdwdwrkr » Wed Apr 12, 2006 12:00 pm

so........what's a segue?

About 4 lbs.

The following more recent postings have been combined with the original postings on the same subject. -- Forum Admin.
Posted - 17 Jan 2007 : 10:52:56
Richard,

What you are trying to track down is the Italian word for 'there follows', which is written 'segue'. (As it's Italian, and your English ears appear to be unusually abrasive, I would check your kitchen worktop for traces of Parmesan, just in case cheese follows -- by which I mean segues -- from all that grating.)

I'm sure you'll find more info if you look up the word on http://www.OneLook.com . But I can make no more promises about the developments that may take place in your kitchen.

Sorry!

Erik Kowal

Posted - 17 Jan 2007 : 11:17:32
Thanks. I feel suitably dumb now!
Weird how suddenly this innocent little Italian word is commonplace. How do such words make this leap?!
Nevertheless, how stylish!

racyrich

Posted - 17 Jan 2007 : 11:29:17
No need to feel dumb, Richard. Getting to know about previously unfamiliar words is a lifelong process of picking passengers up one or two at a time at branch line halts rather than taking on a terminus full of them all in one go.

Some of the links at OneLook give further information regarding the transition of 'segue' from the entertainment industry, where it first made an appearance, into more general use.

Erik Kowal

Posted - 17 Jan 2007 : 13:08:46
Thanks again. The word detective link was particularly good.
I must overcome my misoneism.

racyrich

Posted - 17 Jan 2007 : 15:47:23
Erik_Kowal wrote: . . . (As it's Italian, and your English ears appear to be unusually abrasive, I would check your kitchen worktop for traces of Parmesan, just in case cheese follows -- by which I mean segues -- from all that grating.). . .
Parmesan? I should think headcheese. :-)

Shelley
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Thu Jan 18, 2007 2:27 pm

After doing some further snooping around on this subject, it was interesting to notice that the misspelling of the verb and noun segue as segway existed even before Dean Kamen helped institutionalize the spelling error when he unveiled his ‘Human Transporter’ – the Segway in 2001. It is/was an easy enough mistake to make, but it is surprising that in many instances authors and editors of respectable journals, newspapers, magazines, etc. did not catch it. And I suppose that if the trend continues we just may open our dictionaries one day and find segway listed as an alternate spelling.
<1986 “United States Patent 4,602,279: . . . comprising a segway portion located in each of said channels for providing a visually continuous smooth information transition between said common television message and said television programming sequence 22 July, page 1>

<1998 ‘One resident called the speed radar ‘a segway (sic) to cameras all over the damn city,’”— ‘Denver Post,’ 16 October, page B-01

<1999 “One could take up the recent work of Derrida in terms of ghosts and the work of mourning as a dismantling of the circulatory systems of Marx’s Grundrisse.’ One could engage the Habermas-Gadamer debates and segway back into the Frankfurt School of the Heideggarian project.”—‘South Central Review,’ Vol. 16, No. 2/3, ‘German Studies Today,’ Summer, page 135>

<2000 “The book is essentially designed as a primer, and provides a segway into the current theoretical literature, rather than acting as a comprehensive overview of epidemic models.”—‘The Journal of Parasitology,’ Vol. 86, No. 1, February, page 118>

<2003 [book review] Pathways [[A Guide for Energizing and Enriching Band, Orchestra, and Choral Programs by Joseph Alsobrook]] would have benefited from more careful editing and proofreading to correct some unfortunate misspellings of musical terms and people’s names (such as ‘’Segway and ‘Andrea Bochelli’).”—‘Music Educators Journal,’ Vol. 90, No. 2, November, page 64>

<2006 “The success of the scaled down Fairlanes was evident as future years saw a steady growth in convenience and performance options and the eventual segway into the newer “Torino” models.”—‘St. Louis Dispatch,’ 20 March>
Ken G – January 18, 2007
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Post by Bobinwales » Thu Jan 18, 2007 4:01 pm

Ken Greenwald wrote:
we just may open our dictionaries one day and find segway listed as an alternate spelling.
The Oxford English says
— USAGE The use of alternate to mean alternative (as in we will need to find alternate sources of fuel) is common in North American English, though still regarded as incorrect by many in Britain.
I thought Ken would not have got it wrong, it looked odd to me, but turned out to just another example of us being divided by a common language.
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wheel was quite an invention

Post by dante » Wed Jun 03, 2009 11:36 am

Hello everyone,

I've never seen this "Segway" thing.I wonder if they ask for the driver's licence for driving this:

http://therawfeed.com/pix/segway_mommy.jpg
http://www.crossingwallstreet.com/archives/segway.jpg
http://www.cyril.redhummer.com/Segway/Segway%20004.jpg

There are even Ferrari branded Segways

http://www.2dayblog.com/images/2007/oct ... gway_1.jpg

I guess that this is a big step forward (alright it may be backward I'm not sure :)) for transportation and small step for.. I don't know how that saying went exactly. Those photos document that people seriously contemplated possible applications of the wheel:

http://blog.lib.umn.edu/salwa002/archit ... 20bike.jpg
http://brassgoggles.co.uk/images/steamvelocipede01.gif


Some people think that two wheels are absolutely unnecessary luxury:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_7gYNb3GSh4M/S ... Bwheel.jpg
http://www.hizone.info/data/2003/01/27/ ... wheel3.jpg
http://www.iconocast.com/B0000000000000 ... ews8_2.jpg
http://actuglisse.fr/__oneclick_uploads ... 0_w460.jpg
http://www.multiloisirs.com/jonglerie/p ... cycle2.jpg
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Re: wheel was quite an invention

Post by Bobinwales » Wed Jun 03, 2009 11:45 am

The biggest problem with the Segway is the price!

There must be something seriously wrong with the think-box to even contemplate paying UK£4,795 (US$7,941.70 according to the conversion thingy I just used) for the cheapest version.
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Re: wheel was quite an invention

Post by dante » Wed Jun 03, 2009 12:08 pm

That's reaaaallly unbelievable Bob. I wouldn't drive it for 43414526$ (54325423£). Its two wheels and four cylinders short of what would be my choice. I'd be really anxious about the balancing problem too :). Safety too. Not to mention that I'd need a space suit to drive this windshieldless thing.
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