mnemonics

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mnemonics

Post by Mel » Mon Jan 31, 2005 5:45 pm

My favourite mnemonic is for the order of planets in distance from the sun. "My Very Easy Method: Just Set Up Nine Planets".

One never forgotten from history lessons was BROM, the battles of Marlborough: Blenheim, Ramilles, Oudenaarde, and Malplaquet. I am sure I would have forgotten them by now without it.

Lets here yours.
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Post by Phil White » Mon Jan 31, 2005 7:06 pm

I only remember the punchline (and that perhaps not accurately). If anyone can tell me the story that goes with it, I should be grateful:
"The squaw on the hippopotamus is equal to the sons of the squaws on the other two hides."
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Mon Jan 31, 2005 7:19 pm

Mel, After having worked in physics for a good part of my life, with a stint in astrophysics, my method of remembering the ordering of the planets is still:

My Very Educated Mother Just Served Us Nine Pickles, which I learned back in elementary school.
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Mon Jan 31, 2005 7:28 pm

Phil, That was one from one of those elaborate stories with a punch line akin to "People who live in grass houses shouldn’t stow thrones" and "oberknockity tunes but once." This particular one was for remembering the Pythagorean Theorem: ‘The square on the hypotenuse is equal to the sums of the squares on the other two sides.’

Ken – January 31, 2005
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Post by Wizard of Oz » Mon Jan 31, 2005 9:00 pm

Ken I think Phil wanted the joke that sets up the punchline .. I can recall hearing it but can't remember how it goes either .. it is in that line of jokes were the punchline can be recognised as being a famous line, often from a song .. the ones I can remember are >>

.. Whale meat again (We'll meet again)
.. I left my harp in Sam Plank's disco (I left my heart in San Francisco)
.. The Hills are alive to the sound of Music (with the HIlls being a family)
.. Pardon me boy is that the cat who chewed your new shoes

.. I remember the planets with Mother Venus Eats More Jam So U kNow Pluto .. hang on what happens when Pluto swings inside Neptune ?? .. and everybody knows that guy Roy G Biv and using your knuckles to remember how many days in the months ..

WoZ of Aus 01/02/05
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Post by Phil White » Mon Jan 31, 2005 9:26 pm

Quite so, WoZ; I want the story. It says a lot about the mnemonic that I can't remember half of it, but I can remember my trig and geometry without it.
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Post by russcable » Tue Feb 01, 2005 5:33 am

One version:
Three Indian women are sitting side by side. The first, sitting on a goatskin, has a son who weighs 170 pounds. The second, sitting on a deerskin, has a son who weighs 130 pounds. The third squaw, seated on a hippopotamus hide, weighs 300 pounds. What famous theorum does this illustrate?

One of my favorites ends: Never transport young gulls across staid lions for immortal porpoises.
State capitals: Concorde is the capital of New Hampshire because hampsters like grapes.
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue Feb 01, 2005 7:05 am

A few more good endings:

I must have taken Leif off my census.

Thus we'll never know for whom the Tells bowled.

The thong is ended, but the malady lingers on.

Let me tell you, with fronds like these, who need enemas?

I left my harp in Sandcrab's disco!

There were chess nuts boasting in an open foyer.

It was the beer that made Mel Famey walk us.
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Tue Feb 01, 2005 8:04 am

Yes, where is Leif these days?
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Post by Phil White » Tue Feb 01, 2005 9:38 am

Yes, Russ, it has to be something like that, although I seem to remember that it originally took half a maths lesson in the telling.
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Post by Mel » Tue Feb 01, 2005 3:28 pm

I heard the Pythagorus one something like this.

The sum of the squaws in the Hapotomaks was equal to the sum of the squaws in the other two tribes.( they being the Cree and Sioux).

However most of those are NOT mnemonics.

The maths mnemonic is BODMAS for the order in which to solve an equation.

Brackets Of Divide Multiply Add Subtract. () of / X + -
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Post by Phil White » Tue Feb 01, 2005 7:45 pm

The squaw/hippopotamus one is a mnemonic, being a device to assist memory. Many of the others aren't though.
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Post by Ken Greenwald » Tue Feb 01, 2005 9:24 pm

Mel, The algebraic equivalent, of your arithmetic mnemonic MODMAS, that I have heard for the order of operations, is PEMDAS: Parentheses, Exponentiation, Multiplication, Division, Addition, Subtraction.

SOHCAHTOA is the famous trigonometry mnemonic to remember that in a right triangle 'Sin' is Opposite/Hypotenuse, 'Cos' is Adjacent/Hypotenuse, and 'Tan' is Opposite/Adjacent

ASTC, All Students Take Chemistry, is a mnemonic for remembering the sign of the trigonometric functions Sin, Cos, Tan and their reciprocals in the four quadrants, with all signs being positive in the 1st quadrant and then proceeding CCW, only SIN and its reciprocal CSC being positive in the 2nd quadrant, etc.
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Handy biology mnemonic

Here's a good one I learned recently: King Philip came over for good spaghetti, or, for younger people such as elementary school students, change "sex" to "spaghetti" This stands for kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species. I could never remember these any other way.

Mickeygreeneyes

(Mickey, I have moved this since there was no need for a sepearate posting topic - Ken G)
Thirty days hath Hacienda, April, June, and Sombrero. All the rest have 31 except...

Anybody remember the rest?

Dale Hileman

(Dale, I moved your response to consolidate postings. - Ken)
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Post by Bobinwales » Tue Feb 08, 2005 4:55 pm

I used to teach guitar, and came up with EveryBody Goes Digging An Elephant for the names of the strings. I was then asked about the standard ukulele tuning which is A D F# B. All I ever managed was All Dogs F#ck Bitches.
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Post by Erik_Kowal » Wed Feb 09, 2005 7:00 am

You should be congratulated on your witty use of the sharp symbol, Bob. Truly an inspiration to all of us!

How about Every Body Gets Dressed And Exits for the rock guitarists, not least as the culmination of a highly memorable concert?
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