Search found 1974 matches

by tony h
Sun Apr 16, 2006 9:40 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: A wordy joke
Replies: 3
Views: 2508

A wordy joke

Q: What is the difference between an etymologist and an entomologist?
A: An etymologist knows.

Well it makes me laugh! Thought you lot would appreciate it.
by tony h
Sun Apr 16, 2006 9:23 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Strike me roan!
Replies: 13
Views: 8662

Strike me roan!

Herr von Sacher-Masoch may have another view as to why you may be "happily surprised when struck", but I guess it dosen't help get an answer to the question.
by tony h
Sun Apr 16, 2006 9:15 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: open access to OED one week only
Replies: 41
Views: 7288

open access to OED one week only

through the BBC's wordhunt programme there is access to the full OED online
http://www.oed.com/bbcwords/

Just thought you might like to know

At least Ken can have a quite week.

:)
by tony h
Thu Apr 13, 2006 7:38 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Appearances can be ...
Replies: 14
Views: 3597

Appearances can be ...

I use both but in slightly different circumstances. I use the form "deceptive" when it is the intention of the thing to deceive; and "deceiving" when it just is. In circumstances, such as a creature that has the same markings as a poisonous variety, where there is an evolved, or pre-ordained, "choic...
by tony h
Wed Apr 12, 2006 11:05 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Segway [segue -- Forum Admin.]
Replies: 23
Views: 13215

Segway [segue -- Forum Admin.]

could have posted this here or vier. Thought this might amuse. I mentioned this subject to my wife who remarked on her surprise at an incident. She had gone into the medical records department at the hospital when she overheard : Person 1, reading from medical notes, "and numbness in the fingers" Pe...
by tony h
Tue Apr 11, 2006 10:16 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: vire
Replies: 6
Views: 2361

vire

I agree, as so much of professional use of language it is just a contraction of the full word

From Chambers
virement noun, finance the authorized transference of funds from one account to another.
ETYMOLOGY: Early 20c: French, from virer to turn
by tony h
Fri Apr 07, 2006 1:01 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Segway [segue -- Forum Admin.]
Replies: 23
Views: 13215

Segway [segue -- Forum Admin.]

sequence, sequal, consequence, resequence, obsequious all have their Latin following
by tony h
Thu Apr 06, 2006 10:12 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Segway [segue -- Forum Admin.]
Replies: 23
Views: 13215

Segway [segue -- Forum Admin.]

The opposite is found more commonly as non-sequitur.
by tony h
Tue Apr 04, 2006 8:50 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: windlass
Replies: 10
Views: 1600

windlass

Thanks for that Hans - I only speak one language with any competance - it must be very interesting to be able to see this from so many angles.
by tony h
Tue Apr 04, 2006 8:33 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: eligible
Replies: 2
Views: 1569

eligible

It is the same usage as : - on his 6oth birthday he became eligable for an elderly person's bus pass, - the chief fundraisers will be eligable to receive 3 free tickets to the dinner. In these cases it is that you are in circumstances where you can receive these but won't necessarily use them. regards
by tony h
Tue Apr 04, 2006 9:43 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: triquarterly
Replies: 11
Views: 2534

triquarterly

looking at ther website I note that on page http://www.centerforbookculture.org/pages/publications.html they describe the publication as being QUARTERLY! CONTEXT CONTEXT is a quarterly publication intended to create a historical and cultural context in which to read modern and contemporary literatur...
by tony h
Mon Apr 03, 2006 10:48 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: triquarterly
Replies: 11
Views: 2534

triquarterly

biweekly or bimonthly are defined as either every two weeks or twice a week etc. So presumably the same would be true of triquarterly. Maybe (but I suspect not) it is to differentiate between monthly and three times a month eg every 30.5 days. But in this case triquarterly would be imprecise as it w...
by tony h
Sun Apr 02, 2006 7:16 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: windlass
Replies: 10
Views: 1600

windlass

Haro , I am intrigued by your assertion that "English very often completely distorts the pronunciation of foreign words as soon as it adopts them". Clearly you can see distorsions over time especially between the competing elements of "English" and Norman. But I have always put this down to an inabi...
by tony h
Wed Mar 29, 2006 10:37 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: A dove diving
Replies: 11
Views: 3066

A dove diving

I use both dove and dived. I use worked normally but wrought in craftsmanship (particularly metals) eg : wrought-iron; finely wrough silver; wrought in leather. Maybe worked is your effort and wrought is what you do to materials?
by tony h
Wed Mar 29, 2006 9:18 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: further or farther
Replies: 16
Views: 4427

further or farther

Maybe there is the opportunity to coin a couple of new terms "dirty shouldered" or "clean shouldered". It would give some interesting opportunities. Jim gets his shoulders dirty - Jim will provide good help to others even if he gets no credit. I could't have achieved this without getting Jim's shoul...