Search found 4422 matches

by Bobinwales
Fri Feb 25, 2005 3:11 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: avatar
Replies: 25
Views: 12338

avatar

I Googled the word “avatar”, and found somebody trying to sell them. What are they and do I need one?
by Bobinwales
Fri Feb 25, 2005 9:13 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Chinese parliament
Replies: 7
Views: 7673

Chinese parliament

My understanding is that it is a group of people all talking at once thereby making a loud noise but no sense. The original coining obviously made by someone who did not speak a Chinese language.
by Bobinwales
Thu Feb 24, 2005 11:07 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: And, as they say, Annie's home
Replies: 10
Views: 6694

And, as they say, Annie's home

It could well have been a hoax, but it has been fun, and I have talked to people with whom I have had little contact for years, so it has even done some good.
by Bobinwales
Thu Feb 24, 2005 9:53 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: datum, data
Replies: 10
Views: 4757

datum, data

I and the people around here pronounce it as the name of the pasty-faced android. The bat-uh rhyme is rare in the extreme, and I have never ever heard of a "gotta" rhyme. But I have a problem with Webster anyway, why would someone even think about starting to compile a dictionary when he couldn't sp...
by Bobinwales
Thu Feb 24, 2005 9:31 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: limited edition
Replies: 6
Views: 3693

limited edition

Surely every vintage wine must by definition be a limited edition as there is certainly only going to be one 2004, 2005 etc.
by Bobinwales
Thu Feb 24, 2005 9:27 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: And, as they say, Annie's home
Replies: 10
Views: 6694

And, as they say, Annie's home

I have now checked with a contact in Newcastle, and I found a Cornishman with a Mancunian wife in the pub last night. Regrettably no-one has heard of the expression. I think you have beaten me, I formally give up.
by Bobinwales
Tue Feb 22, 2005 9:04 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: between
Replies: 9
Views: 4928

between

Faced with your predicament Dale I think I would have said “between 6 and 7 inclusively”. Although you were undoubtedly correct, Russ has pointed out how and why confusion could reign, and I have to say that you cannot assume that everyone has an understanding of the vagaries of the language.
by Bobinwales
Tue Feb 22, 2005 5:27 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: And, as they say, Annie's home
Replies: 10
Views: 6694

And, as they say, Annie's home

This expression has buried itself under my skin. I circulated a fairly large group of English people who now live in Wales about the phrase, and although they come from all over England, none has heard of Annie or her home. It would be quite interesting to hear some more background, and in the meant...
by Bobinwales
Mon Feb 21, 2005 8:43 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: reversing quotes
Replies: 11
Views: 9921

reversing quotes

My thanks for putting me in the right direction by at least having the right terminology.
by Bobinwales
Sun Feb 20, 2005 10:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Ay, there's the rub
Replies: 6
Views: 7348

Ay, there's the rub

Thanks for the tip Phil, I appreciate your advice. "The rub of the green" meaning good luck throughout a game is still widely used. I had assumed that it had come from bowls, but not that long ago. Just a thought though, surely bowls at that time would be a game similar to boules (pétanque) which in...
by Bobinwales
Sun Feb 20, 2005 3:47 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Ay, there's the rub
Replies: 6
Views: 7348

Ay, there's the rub

I had this from the Online Etymological Dictionary rub (v.) 1377, perhaps related to E.Fris. rubben "to scratch, rub," and Low Ger. rubbeling "rough, uneven," or similar words in Scandinavian (cf. Dan. rubbe "to rub, scrub," Norw. rubba), of uncertain origin. Hamlet's there's the rub (1602) preserve...
by Bobinwales
Thu Feb 17, 2005 9:13 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: I'll be there with bells on
Replies: 7
Views: 7849

I'll be there with bells on

Just a theory, but Morris dancers who invariably dance with bells on their ankles do not usually wear them to and from the place they are to dance.

A dancer with bells on would be fully dressed and ready to go.
by Bobinwales
Wed Feb 16, 2005 9:13 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: testimony, testicles
Replies: 8
Views: 5328

testimony, testicles

I have actually heard about an oath being sworn on the swearer’s own testicles. It was somewhere in the Mediterranean, Crete?

I would have thought you would feel a bit of a prick though.
by Bobinwales
Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:15 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: number agreement, synesis, and the singular ‘their’
Replies: 20
Views: 17910

number agreement, synesis, and the singular ‘their’

Good grief Louis, I think you just managed an argument against yourself. Your last posting was gibberish to anyone who had not been following the thread, and bloody difficult for those of us who have.
by Bobinwales
Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:08 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: capiche / capisce / capeesh / capish / coppish
Replies: 14
Views: 38344

capiche / capisce / capeesh / capish / coppish

I thought that you might like to know that coppish, (kop-pysh) is a word I have not seen or heard since childhood. We have an extra language in Wales called Wenglish, which was once described as speaking English through the medium of Welsh. Usually it is a use of Welsh grammar in English sentences e...