Search found 57 matches

by Andrew Dalby
Tue Nov 15, 2005 2:12 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Caesar and Rome
Replies: 2
Views: 2147

Caesar and Rome

No, sorry Mel, you aren't. Caesar was the cognomen, the 'surname', in his section of the gens (clan) Julia. It meant 'baldie', and was inherited by C. Julius Caesar from his father and earlier ancestors. (There is a play on this meaning in the oracle-poem which Robert Graves invented for I, Claudius...
by Andrew Dalby
Mon Nov 14, 2005 12:44 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: flavour / flavoured
Replies: 6
Views: 6520

flavour / flavoured

Eric, you raise the point that came into my mind immediately after posting -- who first used the phrase "plain vanilla"? Somebody is being dreadfully rude to vanilla, one of the more luxurious (and expensive) of natural flavourings ...
by Andrew Dalby
Sun Nov 13, 2005 4:50 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: flavour / flavoured
Replies: 6
Views: 6520

flavour / flavoured

Both terms are grammatical, I think. Would a copy-editor prefer an additional hyphen in the second one, "Vanilla-Flavoured Ice-Cream", or am I imagining that? But they might mean something quite different. Vanilla Flavoured Ice-Cream, literally, ice-cream flavoured with vanilla (from fermented pods ...
by Andrew Dalby
Sun Nov 13, 2005 4:32 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: the origin of the word Greek
Replies: 10
Views: 8517

the origin of the word Greek

Haro, would you and your sources agree with the following? The first known people to use the word Graikoi/Graeci as a handle to designate Greek people as a whole was the Romans. It often happens that the name of the nearest relevant tribe, or one of the first tribes encountered -- which as far as th...
by Andrew Dalby
Sat Nov 12, 2005 12:39 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: pasty vs pastie
Replies: 34
Views: 13721

pasty vs pastie

Erik Kowal, 9 November: ... Is it beyond the wit of man to invent a pastry-based edible-cum-wearable accoutrement for strippers? The need is obvious. Erik, Quaker Foods have at least attempted something approaching your heart's desire. According to a quote from 'The News Quiz', (to) which I am liste...
by Andrew Dalby
Fri Nov 11, 2005 8:40 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: the die is cast / the dye is cast
Replies: 17
Views: 25811

the die is cast / the dye is cast

Haro, I like that word 'posteriority' (your Oct 23 posting) ... and I like even better your demonstration (26 Oct, disguised as Phil White) that 'the die is cast' and 'alea iacta est' are MIStranslations of Menander's original Greek line. According to modern commentaries on Suetonius's life of Caesa...
by Andrew Dalby
Wed Nov 09, 2005 1:22 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Not enough English?
Replies: 18
Views: 10483

Not enough English?

The same problem that Erik describes for (say) South Asian patients in British hospitals is faced by an increasing number of mostly elderly British abroad. They emigrate to France, Spain, etc. while still healthy (because life is cheaper and the weather is warmer) but then of course get older and fr...
by Andrew Dalby
Tue Nov 08, 2005 9:14 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: pasty vs pastie
Replies: 34
Views: 13721

pasty vs pastie

Can anyone confirm what is said in Alan Davidson's Oxford Companion to Food, that the Cornish pasty (or at least the idea of a Cornish pasty!) was taken to Michigan by Cornish miners, and that in Michigan the pasties interbred or cross-fertilised, so to speak, with a similar product familiar to Finn...
by Andrew Dalby
Tue Nov 08, 2005 8:37 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: f's for s's?????
Replies: 11
Views: 5161

f's for s's?????

Yes, Erik, thank you, I guessed it was probably there. I just thought it made sense to give a straight answer as well ...
by Andrew Dalby
Sat Nov 05, 2005 7:04 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: f's for s's?????
Replies: 11
Views: 5161

f's for s's?????

If Heather was looking for intelligent life, she hasn't found it here (or so it seems to me). Why no straight answer? Here is one: those fs are not quite fs if you look at them closely in a book printed before 1800 or so. They are a character like an f but lacking the front tick. It is the alternate...
by Andrew Dalby
Fri Nov 04, 2005 1:44 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: cream teas
Replies: 19
Views: 8947

cream teas

Thanks, Phil. I see that saffron buns are said to be a Good Friday speciality, but the lunch I was asking about took place in July. So evidently the advice by Ruth Pretty, author of the recipe you pointed me to, was adopted by the people at Morwenstow -- "Should you stumble upon some clotted cream, ...
by Andrew Dalby
Thu Nov 03, 2005 5:29 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: cream teas
Replies: 19
Views: 8947

cream teas

On 14 July 1919, the artist Carrington (as played by Emma Thompson) wrote to Lytton Strachey about a snack she had enjoyed at Morwenstow (Devon): "Such a lunch at the Bush Inn, Morwenstow, for 1/3: cream, saffron buns and black-a-berrie jam." (Incidentally, this was the daily quote on the Food Word ...