Search found 7853 matches

by Archived Topic
Sun Dec 05, 2004 2:41 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: silverware (in sports)
Replies: 5
Views: 1026

silverware (in sports)

"... attended a gala evening at the Earl of Desmond Hotel, Tralee, for the Annual Sports Awards night. While silverware may have been scarce this year, there were ..." - Institute of Technology Tralee April Presume "silverware" refers to some sort of award; any help appreciated Submitted by dale hil...
by Archived Topic
Sun Dec 05, 2004 12:46 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: bell, book, and candle
Replies: 0
Views: 1405

bell, book, and candle

BELL, BOOK, AND CANDLE (often preceded by CURSED BY): The formulaic requirements for laying a curse on someone with allusion to the popular phrase for the ancient ritual of excommunication from the Roman Catholic Church. And thus, by extension, any process of condemnation carried out thoroughly and ...
by Archived Topic
Sat Dec 04, 2004 11:34 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: black dog
Replies: 5
Views: 2823

black dog

What is the history of "black dog" as a term used to describe depression? Submitted by Vicki Scollay (Sydney - Australia) Does anyone know anything of the origins of the phrase, black dog, as in depression? Particularly, in regards to some Celtic myth with a possible connection to why British WW11 P...
by Archived Topic
Sat Dec 04, 2004 12:03 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Microsoft corrupting "English" world-wide? ('-ise vs. '-ize
Replies: 46
Views: 9853

Microsoft corrupting "English" world-wide? ('-ise vs. '-ize

Having taught English as a senior teacher in England (and recently in Asia) for more than 30 years, I have detected an alarming trend. The general populance of the world is absorbing Microsoft's interpretation of the English language, as if it IS English. I have an English friend who has been a copy...
by Archived Topic
Sat Dec 04, 2004 11:34 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Tuna Carpaccio
Replies: 1
Views: 851

Tuna Carpaccio

Hi, I watched Iron Chef the other day (you know, that show with the expert chef and his challenger and the rest of the audience drooling and salivating away while looking on in the vain (but nonetheless commendable) hope that they'll get a bite of some of the dishes), and the expert chef made this d...
by Archived Topic
Sat Dec 04, 2004 9:53 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: cache
Replies: 6
Views: 1597

cache

Any thoughts about why 'cache' (as in 'a large cache of weapons was found in one of the buildings in Fallujah') is often mispronounced as CASH-A?
Submitted by Fred Johnson (Bellvue - Choose a Country)
by Archived Topic
Sat Dec 04, 2004 8:13 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: gerund and infinitive problem
Replies: 6
Views: 3823

gerund and infinitive problem

We disagree as to which of these is correct: "the many others who contributed to achieving the dream," OR "the many others who contributed to achieve the dream." Can you tell me WHY one or the other is correct?
Submitted by Alisande Cutler (Ann Arbor - U.S.A.)
by Archived Topic
Sat Dec 04, 2004 7:44 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: panned by the critics
Replies: 3
Views: 4024

panned by the critics

I have found that this word usage arose around 1911. I believe it's derived from 'flash in the pan'.
Input?
Submitted by Jimmie Whipple (New Braunfels - U.S.A.)
by Archived Topic
Sat Dec 04, 2004 7:01 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: blue-sky
Replies: 2
Views: 988

blue-sky

blue-sky (adj) 1 : having little or no value <blue-sky stock> 2 : not grounded in the realities of the present <blue-sky thinking> (Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary) Do these uses of blue-sky have something to do with having your head in the clouds? How long has blue-sky been used in this way, and ...
by Archived Topic
Sat Dec 04, 2004 6:46 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: slush fund
Replies: 0
Views: 1640

slush fund

The expression SLUSH FUND arose in a conversation I was having this morning and I began to wonder exactly where the ‘slush’ in slush fund came from. I suppose I had always half-consciously assumed that this adjective ‘slush’ came from the verb describing the mobility of the fund to ‘slush around’ an...
by Archived Topic
Sat Dec 04, 2004 3:39 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: being punished for what was someone else's fault
Replies: 4
Views: 2090

being punished for what was someone else's fault

I was just wondering if there is a phrase that means that a small number of people get puinished for a fault commited by a larger number of people. Let me quote an example: In a class of 20 students, 17 are making noise while 3 are studying. Because of the commotion, the teacher comes in and punishe...
by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 10:37 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: lingerie
Replies: 28
Views: 9386

lingerie

I'm all in favour of anglicising French words when very much in common use. Debris, e.g., with the accent on 'deb'. And realise that certain indescribables/unmentionables are no longer made of linen (linge) as a rule. However, the persistent use of the pronunciation 'lonjery', in defiance of every d...
by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 9:10 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: The negative suffix of 'credible' is 'incredible'!!!!
Replies: 5
Views: 4443

The negative suffix of 'credible' is 'incredible'!!!!

How is it that the word 'incredible' now means amazing...? 'Incredible' is just the direct antonym for 'credible'. Therefore if something is not credible, is it incredible...? -Something to think about: my name appears at the bottom of this message, therefore the message can be credited to me, so it...
by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 8:41 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: cult
Replies: 1
Views: 825

cult

I see someone has already inquired about this word, however, I have been trying to locate the creator or origin of the word and have had no luck. The closest I've found is somewhere in the 17th Century stemming from Latin roots of the word "cultus" with religious meaning. Could someone please help m...
by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 4:51 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: tidbit and titbit
Replies: 5
Views: 2969

tidbit and titbit

Now I always preferred titbit - goes without saying. When I first saw tidbit I thought it was a misprint. It has the same meaning, (a morsel of information, or other useful substance) but tidbit seems more prevalent than the later. What do you think Ken, or anybody else? Submitted by Xinch ( - Irela...