Search found 7853 matches

by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 1:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Christmas vs. Xmas
Replies: 15
Views: 5207

Christmas vs. Xmas

Does anyone have any ideas about the origin of the the word XMAS in that particular form? Submitted by Steve Jughes (Nederland- Texas) _____________________________ My grand-daughter asked me today why "Christmas" and "Xmas" meant the same thing...and I had the devil of a time trying to give her an ...
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 1:01 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: the pronunciation of machine
Replies: 3
Views: 1434

the pronunciation of machine

Why the sound of ch in machine sounds like sh instead of ch in chicken or child?
Submitted by peter bhan (daegu - Korea)
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 12:21 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: yarn
Replies: 2
Views: 811

yarn

Asking the question about story, got me thinking about the use of
yarn for a tall tale. Yarn was what my mother knitted with. I looked it
up and it comes from the Greek for string.
Submitted by Gary Wallington (Akolele - Australia)
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 10:21 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: follow the straight and narrow
Replies: 2
Views: 1272

follow the straight and narrow

The meaning I can understand very well. I only have difficulty finding equivalents to this (useful) idiom, if any. Could you help, please?
Submitted by Julie Kay (Bronnitsy - Russia)
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 9:41 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: 'del' as a prefix
Replies: 2
Views: 1010

'del' as a prefix

Why was the word Del used as a prefix to so many names of musical groups of the 50's and early 60's? Did it have some significant meaning then, such as phat or groovy or something else at the time? i.e. Delfonics, Del Vikings, The Dells, Del Shannon. Submitted by michael turmel (manchester - U.S.A.)
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 8:34 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: OFF LIMITS
Replies: 4
Views: 1015

OFF LIMITS

I thought this phrase was not longer in use, then I heard it on TV in a youth setting and Googling gets all kinds of hits. This phrase when first encountered as a kid, was one of those serious utterances but it also stuck out like a sore thumb for its lack of asignmenmentionability with other words....
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 6:47 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: chimerical
Replies: 8
Views: 2179

chimerical

What is the true definition of "chimerical",

and where did it originate?

Submitted by nadia evans (london - England)
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 3:41 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: hooligans
Replies: 2
Views: 1302

hooligans

Just checked the archives, and there are no hooligans in them. I have a problem with hooligans, in that they constantly clog-up my kayboard (see what i mean?) and make me write wierds i didn't mean to wrote. Could someone :-) etymologize the hooligans for me, please? Ta everso. Rooey Nosbert. Submit...
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 12:47 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: to the nth degree
Replies: 11
Views: 1684

to the nth degree

Hello all, I have often heard the phrase "to the Nth degree" but have been unable to find any indication of its origin. I assume it comes from mathematics, with "N" being a variable, but why "N"? Why not "X"? Can anyone shed any light on this subject? Thanks, Submitted by Jeff Freeman (Orlando - U.S...
by Archived Topic
Mon Dec 13, 2004 10:47 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: kerb and curb
Replies: 3
Views: 1901

kerb and curb

I was bemused to realise that CURB (as in stop, cease, prevent) was seemingly USA in usage, in terms of pavements (widesorks erm...you know what I mean.) Unusual, as most-times the USA usage is a corruption of the English thing. Here...KERB (English) has the same meaning as CURB...KERB/CURBSTONE. I'...
by Archived Topic
Mon Dec 13, 2004 10:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: bog-standard
Replies: 2
Views: 1663

bog-standard

In a previous posting “the cat’s whisker’s” the question of the origin of ‘bog-standard,’ a terrific expression which isn’t used much in the U.S., was raised. The following is a compilation of the most reliable of what I was able to glean from the literature on the subject. There are several theorie...
by Archived Topic
Mon Dec 13, 2004 11:41 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Hinglish
Replies: 2
Views: 1198

Hinglish

.. to add a little more "legitimate" research to the "might is right" argument of the evolution of the English language I thought the following, taken from ABC Word Watch, is putting things into perspective >>> Hinglish David Crystal is a University of Wales professor who's written over 40 books on ...
by Archived Topic
Mon Dec 13, 2004 10:21 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: giv'us a deck.
Replies: 4
Views: 1228

giv'us a deck.

The fiddlydeck question made me wonder where the word deck as in: 'Giv'us a deck', or 'Let's have a deck', meaning 'I want to look', comes from.
I'll have a deck at this column tomorrow to see if anyone knows...
Submitted by Leighton Harris (Cambridge - England)
by Archived Topic
Mon Dec 13, 2004 7:14 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: share or sharing
Replies: 1
Views: 708

share or sharing

hello. i wonder if anybody could help me with the origin of the word 'share' or 'sharing". thanks
Submitted by Su-May Liew (Kuala Lumpur - Malaysia)
by Archived Topic
Mon Dec 13, 2004 4:47 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: fiddley deck
Replies: 2
Views: 1804

fiddley deck

Help. In the bar the other night one of our thirsty group of ships engineers asked the if anyone was aware of the origins of the term "fiddley deck". All present were aware of what and where this deck was but no one knew where and when the term came from. Please help as there may be a free drink for...