Search found 7853 matches

by Archived Topic
Thu Dec 16, 2004 5:54 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: word versus vocabulary
Replies: 12
Views: 3080

word versus vocabulary

What is the difference between the word and the vocabulary? Anybody has a good analogy?
Submitted by peter bhan (daegu - Korea)
by Archived Topic
Wed Dec 15, 2004 11:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: suck up all the oxygen
Replies: 5
Views: 1681

suck up all the oxygen

"... strides onscreen, screaming for Ged's head, abusing priestesses...and generally sucking up all the oxygen in the room" -- So Florida Sun-Sentinel
Submitted by dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Topic
Wed Dec 15, 2004 9:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: jumbo
Replies: 9
Views: 1581

jumbo

It's curious how many words in common use come from a language few have heard of - Gullah. The language or perhaps dialect of West African slaves on the sea islands of South Carolina and Georgia. Voodoo, juke[-box], goober, cooter, jumbo, etc. OED obstinately declines to accept this derivation of 'j...
by Archived Topic
Wed Dec 15, 2004 8:34 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: the dickens
Replies: 6
Views: 10347

the dickens

Origin of "like the dickens." For example, "that hurt like the dickens" or "it was raining like the dickens." I hear it periodically in Ohio and Minnesota. Suz Submitted by Suzanne Compton (Powell - U.S.A.) Can anyone further the explanation on the origin of the above phrase. the dictionery lists it...
by Archived Topic
Wed Dec 15, 2004 6:47 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: gut soup
Replies: 17
Views: 2554

gut soup

Meaning vomit. I would like to use it but I'm not too sure about its viability, as I get only 109 hits--a microscopically small number for entrenched slang. Could anyone with teeners confirm this one? Thanks guys
Submitted by dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Topic
Wed Dec 15, 2004 3:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: shambles
Replies: 5
Views: 1871

shambles

I was reading ‘Bee Season’ (2000) by Myla Goldberg, which at least by page 83, is proving to be a jewel of a story, when I came across the following: “ . . . . the priest shambles toward him in that slow but inevitable ‘Night of the Living Dead’ way. Most of us are probably familiar with the noun ‘s...
by Archived Topic
Wed Dec 15, 2004 3:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: in cahoots
Replies: 16
Views: 8543

in cahoots

I'd like to know the origin of this phrase "in cahoots" or "in choots with". How did it come to mean being in league with someone or a partner? Where does the phrase come from and how old is it?
Submitted by Joanne Walen (Mesa - U.S.A.)
by Archived Topic
Wed Dec 15, 2004 9:54 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: bottle / a lot of bottle / bottle out / lost his bottle
Replies: 11
Views: 5080

bottle / a lot of bottle / bottle out / lost his bottle

Anyone care to break down this british gem? Submitted by Gregg MacDonald (Halifax - Canada) [h]Posted - 13 Jul 2007 : 09:49:56[/h] I know what "Dutch courage" (however racist that may be) means, but today I was reminded again of "bottle" which may be related, or may not. I can't find any stated link...
by Archived Topic
Wed Dec 15, 2004 9:14 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: take a call
Replies: 2
Views: 1468

take a call

Please let me know the usage of this phrase
Submitted by latha prabhu (Bangalore - India)
by Archived Topic
Wed Dec 15, 2004 7:01 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: flapjacks
Replies: 9
Views: 13871

flapjacks

Could anyone tell me how the word "flapjack" came to be used as a common name for pancake, griddle cake or hotcake? Thanks Submitted by Susan (Pensacola - FL) Flapjack, a dough cooked on both sides on a griddle or an oat type cake oven baked! Does any one know where the term came from? Submitted by ...
by Archived Topic
Wed Dec 15, 2004 12:07 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: British Empire, French spellings...
Replies: 23
Views: 3706

British Empire, French spellings...

Being so close to Canada, I see and read a lot of Canadian print material. Now I know that the Queen's English includes the use of the French spellings of words that came to English through French (coloUr, humoUr, behavioUr, manOeuvRE, et al.). My question is this: if they're spelled in French, yet ...
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 10:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: bound and determined
Replies: 11
Views: 4785

bound and determined

Can anyone help with the origin of the phrase 'bound and determined'? I have not heard it commonly used in years.
Submitted by Sean Ryan (Petoskey - U.S.A.)
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 7:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: laundromat
Replies: 9
Views: 4183

laundromat

What is the origin of the word laundromat?
Submitted by kris campbell (cherry valley - U.S.A.)
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 7:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: defraud
Replies: 1
Views: 699

defraud

M-W says: Main Entry: de·fraud Pronunciation: di-'frod, dE- Function: transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French defrauder, from Latin defraudare, from de- + fraudare to cheat, from fraud-, fraus fraud : to deprive of something by deception or fraud synonym see CHEAT and yet defin...
by Archived Topic
Tue Dec 14, 2004 5:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: map
Replies: 1
Views: 604

map

what language did the word map come from?
was it hebrew or latin?
Submitted by Lili Marlene (St Petersburg - Russia)