Search found 7853 matches

by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 3:53 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: yellowhammer
Replies: 3
Views: 1213

yellowhammer

There was a small section of a town near here where the
people were called "yellow hammers". The accepted meaning
was that there had been inbreeding for generations amoung
them. Have you heard this word before?
Submitted by LAURIE MCCONNELL (Dwight,Illinois - U.S.A.)
by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 3:25 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: pudding / pud
Replies: 1
Views: 772

pudding / pud

A 'hangoff' is slang for a kind of contest in which puds are compared. A synonym I have encountered is "O-limp-dicks." However, I find scant support for it, even after a half-hour Google. Could a WW'er with teens help out? THanks very kindly Submitted by dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.) Dale...
by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 11:34 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: ambiguious phrases
Replies: 12
Views: 2874

ambiguious phrases

My mother once said "I'm going to work late today", which is completely ambiguous; it could mean that she would be travelling to work later than usual or that she would be finishing work later than usual. Additionally, my paternal grandmother used to run a wool shop which had a fabric awning above t...
by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 8:13 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Dubya
Replies: 7
Views: 1863

Dubya

This word apparently is used with reference to US President George W Bush. How and in what context did it start?
Submitted by Muralidhar Rao (Bangalore - India)
by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 5:05 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Jules Verne - pronunciation
Replies: 8
Views: 4595

Jules Verne - pronunciation

I was watching the TV this evening when the French sci-fi pioneer's name was mentioned, and it occurred to me that in English, the pronunciation is always anglicised; i.e. "jools vurn" rather than "zhuel vaihrn" as it would be in French. As far as I know, this is not the case with most personal name...
by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 4:08 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: inchoative verb
Replies: 2
Views: 2746

inchoative verb

Would someone please explain an; "inchoative verb" and/or a; "inchoative phrase?" Thank you.
Submitted by Dave Schroder (Dayton, Ohio - U.S.A.)
by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 3:25 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: spifflicating
Replies: 2
Views: 693

spifflicating

Is 'splifflicating' a colloquial phrase?
Submitted by Rebecca Flynn (Liverpool - England)
by Archived Topic
Fri Dec 03, 2004 1:58 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: fair's fair
Replies: 3
Views: 1140

fair's fair

I am a trainee teacher who is taking her first literacy lesson next week. On the medium term plans I have to explain the meaning of the phrase 'fair's fair'. Can anyone tell me what it means and where it originated. Thanks to all
Submitted by Rebecca Flynn (Liverpool - England)
by Archived Topic
Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:37 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: "a ways" comes before "aardvark"
Replies: 11
Views: 1964

"a ways" comes before "aardvark"

In Microsoft Word, is there a way to make a space between two words that will fool Bill Gates into thinking there’s a letter there Bill’s idea of “alphabetical” is grossly different from the rest of the world’s; he gets confused when an entry has more than one word. What ’m trying to do is find a wa...
by Archived Topic
Thu Dec 02, 2004 8:13 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: honeymoon
Replies: 0
Views: 1864

honeymoon

There are so many different versions of the origin of this word, I don't know which one to keep. Submitted by ( - ) Quoting John Ayto describing 'Honeymoon': "his description (Richard Huloet 1552) suggests not only that the term had already been around for some time by the 1550's but also that it wa...
by Archived Topic
Thu Dec 02, 2004 6:46 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: resignatory
Replies: 5
Views: 2986

resignatory

Here is a new word.
Not in any online dictionarys yet.
60 hits in google and I am using it despite only assuming what it means. My bad.
Submitted by Xinch ( - Ireland)
by Archived Topic
Thu Dec 02, 2004 4:51 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: jake
Replies: 7
Views: 1109

jake

In reading Hughes' "THE FATAL SHORE" I came across the phrase "...empty their Jakes upon our tables!" from a Virginian in 1751. Any ideas as to the meaning/origin?
Submitted by BRYAN KELLETT (MELBOURNE - Australia)
by Archived Topic
Thu Dec 02, 2004 1:15 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: xenaphon
Replies: 12
Views: 1809

xenaphon

What is the origin of the word xenaphon?
Submitted by meryl greene (scotch plains - U.S.A.)
by Archived Topic
Thu Dec 02, 2004 4:37 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: motza (also motser)
Replies: 12
Views: 2792

motza (also motser)

Motza is an Aussie slang term meaning a large amount of money or more specifically a large gambling win .. it can also refer to a "certainty" that would ensure such a win. 1943 Baker 51: Motser, Motza. A large sum of money. 1950 Australian Police Journal Apr., 116: Motza. A lot of money 1970 Richard...
by Archived Topic
Thu Dec 02, 2004 1:29 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: bury the hatchet
Replies: 4
Views: 909

bury the hatchet

What is its origin?