Search found 1374 matches

by russcable
Tue Mar 29, 2005 5:04 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: scarf (the eating one)
Replies: 2
Views: 5586

scarf (the eating one)

Although I believe you and the dictionary suppports that meaning, I have never in my life heard of anyone scoffing anything unless they are mocking it usually with "at" as in "I scoff at your use of scoff". Also "scarfing up" can mean taking/gathering esp. with the intent to horde as in "Stop scarfi...
by russcable
Tue Mar 29, 2005 4:42 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: scotch (the verb)
Replies: 18
Views: 6333

scotch (the verb)

I have never heard Bob's usage - in the US we call that a chock, but m-w.com does have a listing for scotch as "a chock to prevent rolling or slipping". Since we're on the topic, butterscotch seems to be a topic of disagreement among the dictionaries, is it Scottish, scored, shaped like a chock?, or...
by russcable
Mon Mar 28, 2005 5:18 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: doctor
Replies: 5
Views: 2575

doctor

Since it's your first time, I'll not only point out that the link to the Merriam-Webster dictionary on the left side of the main page probably would answer your question, but I'll also go ahead and provide it as well. Doctor is from the Latin noun "doctor" a teacher, from the Latin verb "docere" to ...
by russcable
Thu Mar 24, 2005 5:30 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: tomorrow is another day / tomorrow is a new day
Replies: 23
Views: 10965

tomorrow is another day / tomorrow is a new day

mongrowl, I got a rather opposite idea from Phil's statement about German - I got the impression that the Germans wouldn't consider something optimized until it was fully complete (why is this optimization not finished yet!) while English speakers consider "partially optimized" somewhat satisfactory...
by russcable
Wed Mar 23, 2005 5:23 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: CHUM
Replies: 3
Views: 2311

CHUM

Perhaps he'll like this from the Compact OED (askoxford.com): "ORIGIN originally Oxford University slang for a room-mate: probably short for chamber-fellow" Interestingly, the online OED and Cambridge dictionaries don't mention the fish bait meaning yet none of the others seem to mention it as an "A...
by russcable
Wed Mar 23, 2005 6:46 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: untranslatables
Replies: 45
Views: 14734

untranslatables

"anesthetically decorated"? Her jewelry was so excessive that it put me to sleep. (I love it when a typo makes a real word.)
by russcable
Sun Mar 20, 2005 6:55 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: amen
Replies: 8
Views: 2642

amen

I, too, am hesitant to trust this EgYptologist and his theory about AmuN RA.
by russcable
Sun Mar 20, 2005 6:40 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: sousaphone
Replies: 5
Views: 2742

sousaphone

The sousaphone is named for John Philip Sousa, aka the March King. It was developed by the Conn company at his request in the 1890's to provide better sound for marching bands. It is basically a tuba, but the shape is different so that the bell protrudes over the head of the player thus projecting t...
by russcable
Wed Mar 16, 2005 8:28 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Origin and meaning of "re"?
Replies: 4
Views: 2277

Origin and meaning of "re"?

'Re-' as a prefix existed in Classical Latin, from which Vulgar Latin is derived. Ecclesiastical Latin (the language used by the Catholic Church) developed from Vulgar Latin quite a bit later, as the early Church originally used Greek as its scholarly language. Latin, being one of the early Indo-Eur...
by russcable
Tue Mar 15, 2005 6:15 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: pair
Replies: 8
Views: 3225

pair

Eric, yes musically it would be correct to say "duo", my point was that my own thought patterns when thinking about pair and I asked myself what would I call three matching bombings, I came up with trio so I could understand how people's thoughts could come up with pair. Also, thinking about this no...
by russcable
Mon Mar 14, 2005 11:28 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: repertory
Replies: 4
Views: 4566

repertory

For the usage you are going for, I also would always recommend "repertoire". Repertory is often used in the context of a company that repeats the same (usually short) series of performances over and over, e.g. a theater company that performs "Much Ado About Nothing" one night, "Romeo and Juliet" one...
by russcable
Mon Mar 14, 2005 5:49 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: avatar
Replies: 25
Views: 8544

avatar

Dale, in computer gaming parlance, a bot is something that resembles a player character but is controlled by a computer rather than an actual player. In many online FPS (first-person shooter) games, if there aren't enough real people connected, you can add bot "players" to the game to make it seem l...
by russcable
Fri Mar 11, 2005 6:20 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: pair
Replies: 8
Views: 3225

pair

I did a search on "pair of bombings" that found 1,690 hits which seemed to be from just glancing at the first page possibly more related than the two you mention. My next thought was to search on "trio of bombings" (293 hits) and "quartet of bombings" (0 hits). Then I thought about what I had just d...
by russcable
Wed Mar 09, 2005 5:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: squeegee
Replies: 12
Views: 6296

squeegee

From an article on thisoldhouse.com: "The squeegee goes back to the Middle Ages, when fishermen scraped fish guts off boat decks with wooden swabs called "squilgees." It wasn't until the turn of the 20th century that window washers adopted a rubber-bladed version of the tool." The squeegee as known ...
by russcable
Mon Mar 07, 2005 8:33 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: therapist
Replies: 8
Views: 3609

therapist

A clue to the supposed "triggering factor" mentioned: history is the story of only males.