Search found 27158 matches

by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:41 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: factor
Replies: 13
Views: 6496

factor

Jeff, your query centered on the age of the practice. This is, as Ken indicated in a past thread, sometimes very difficult to determine; especially if the key word is not first. Fudge factor goes back to 1962 anyway; finagle factor, 1950's; pucker factor goes back to WWII Reply from dale hileman (Ap...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:27 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: factor
Replies: 13
Views: 6496

factor

per KEN, Somehow, I don’t find this at all upsetting and, in fact, find the distinction so fine that in most instances, I can’t even tell the difference but that may just be my lack of grammatical discrimination. No, Ken, you may be right grammatically, but don't brag about an insensitivity. Grammar...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:14 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: factor
Replies: 13
Views: 6496

factor

Julie, No one should leave home without one! (<:)
_______________________

Ken G – December 20, 2004

Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:01 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: factor
Replies: 13
Views: 6496

factor

Ken, 'irritation meter'?

Julie
Reply from ( - )
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:47 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: factor
Replies: 13
Views: 6496

factor

Jeff and Louis, I had never given this a moments thought, but after looking up ‘factor’ and what the big boys have to say about it, I guess there is something going on, but as far as I am concerned it is too subtle to register very high on my irritation meter. According to the definition given by di...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:34 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: factor
Replies: 13
Views: 6496

factor

Boo! Hiss!
Reply from Jeff Freeman (Orlando, FL - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:21 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: factor
Replies: 13
Views: 6496

factor

Jeff, Well actually, this all began with Max Factor, but not to worry – the problem is only cosmetic! (&lt)
_______________________

Ken G – December 19, 2004
Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:07 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: factor
Replies: 13
Views: 6496

factor

Jeff, For the purpose of my response lets take " 'FACTOR' is a noun that actively contributes to the production of a result or condition". For this to make sense, the ADJECTIVE that modifies this noun must keep that noun "real" and the (result or condition) must also be not only "real" but either st...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 9:54 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: factor
Replies: 13
Views: 6496

factor

That's what led to my question...I see and hear it all the time now. But what led to this outbreak of factor?
JF 12/19/2004
Reply from Jeff Freeman (Orlando, FL - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 9:41 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: factor
Replies: 13
Views: 6496

factor

Jeff: Thank you for the query. Recently "factor" preceded by a noun has become a very common construction: fun ~, finagle ~, fear ~, O'reilly ~, Nader ~ (365,000 hits)--DH
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 9:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: son of a gun
Replies: 7
Views: 5068

son of a gun

Ken,

Wasn't the "Gun Deck" the more private and roomier area? The space between guns was the preferred locale for fornication. The phrase "son of a gun" meaning born under a gun, was another term for "bastard". No research here, just something I have heard for years.

Gregg
Reply from ( - )
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 9:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: son of a gun
Replies: 7
Views: 5068

son of a gun

Hon of a gun
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 8:47 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: son of a gun
Replies: 7
Views: 5068

son of a gun

I said above, “When one of these women gave birth to a child without knowing which one of the sailors had fathered it, the child was considered a 'soldier’s bastard' and the paternity was logged as ‘gun’ and the child as ‘son of a gun.’” Hmm. Wonder what they called the kid if it was a girl. But may...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 8:34 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: son of a gun
Replies: 7
Views: 5068

son of a gun

Maggie, Perhaps that would be better termed an ‘engaugement’ than a marriage.
__________________________

Ken G – December 21, 2004

Reply from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 8:21 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: son of a gun
Replies: 7
Views: 5068

son of a gun

Could also be the result of a "shotgun marriage."

Maggie in Oregon
Reply from ( - )