Search found 27158 matches

by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 9:27 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 5960

profanity and sacrilige

Nathon, Sacrilege and profanity needs no swearing to be. If you must utter one or the other then if it debases, it is more than just sacrilegious and graduates to profanity. If you need instructions more complicated than that, consult further with Dale. 2k4dec16thr20:30,lneil Reply from Louis Bussey...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 9:01 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 5960

profanity and sacrilige

It's debated that swearing originates from when people actually 'swore' an oath in the middle ages. The trouble was, they started doing it all the time, for any reason. For example: 'By Our Lady have a safe journey', or even, ' By Our Lady pass me that bag of French fries.' Bloody transliterated in ...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 8:34 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 5960

profanity and sacrilige

Semantically, swearing is limited to utterances, and needs to be of a "strong", or oathlike nature. Sacrilege, curiously is relatively mild when compared to 'profane'( which is a debasement of someone's principle or religion) because one needs only to not adhere to that principle to be sacrilegious....
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 7:41 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: in the tub
Replies: 3
Views: 2049

in the tub

~...Bankrupt; ruined; =in the dumper--H-c Dict of Am Slang--dh
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 7:01 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: in the tub
Replies: 3
Views: 2049

in the tub

He just means that he needs a long hot soak to get away from it all (the stress and aggravation of the situation). As the old commercial for bubblebath used to say - "Calgon, take me away!"
Reply from Russ Cable (Dallas, TX - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 3:54 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: modern spelling
Replies: 4
Views: 2127

modern spelling

John,

Thanks! That's exactly what I was looking for.

JF 12/17/2004
Reply from Jeff Freeman (Orlando, FL - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 3:41 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: modern spelling
Replies: 4
Views: 2127

modern spelling

The English Civil War of the 1640's was a considerable influence on prior (Tudor) spelling. In Elizabeth's reign, the concept of a 'regular' or correct way to spell a word was more or less meaningless. But from 1641, a vast outpour of War tracts commenced, and the editing of these printed items brou...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 3:27 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: modern spelling
Replies: 4
Views: 2127

modern spelling

try getting your hands on a copy of Bill Bryson's 'Made in America' This doesn't really answer your question but it may be of interest
saus

Reply from Brian Hooper (Yeppoon - Australia)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 3:14 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: modern spelling
Replies: 4
Views: 2127

modern spelling

I don't know a lot about this, but I always thought, from an american point of view, it was Webster's tome that marked the day.
lneil
Reply from Louis Bussey (Boise - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 12:47 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: like a lizard drinking
Replies: 2
Views: 1587

like a lizard drinking

Thank you Wiz; yes when I block "flat out," I get only 23 hits, which is very small by Google standards

I really appreciate the examples too

But has anybody here with teeners heard it? Thanks all--dh
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 12:34 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: like a lizard drinking
Replies: 2
Views: 1587

like a lizard drinking

Dale I have never encoutered this Aussie expression without the "flat out" part, viz "Mate, he was flat out like a lizard drinking." .. the irony or not is contextual and depends upon how it is used and in reference to whom .. it can mean both that he was just working very hard and fast or that it w...
by Archived Reply
Thu Dec 16, 2004 11:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: sitting around like a lemon
Replies: 7
Views: 4062

sitting around like a lemon

And lemons are so appeeling, even if they are just a tad yellow-bellied, I just couldn't resist.
Can't get any more juice out of this one without ade.
Reply from Leighton Harris (Cambridge - England)
by Archived Reply
Thu Dec 16, 2004 10:34 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: sitting around like a lemon
Replies: 7
Views: 4062

sitting around like a lemon

Rob and Leighton, thank you kindly--excellent threads--and especially for the examples--DH
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Thu Dec 16, 2004 10:21 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: sitting around like a lemon
Replies: 7
Views: 4062

sitting around like a lemon

erm....woudn't a more ladylike version of standing around like a spare prick at a wedding be..."standing around like a spare cunt at a wedding"?
Just asking...
Reply from Rob Masters (Thailand - Thailand)
by Archived Reply
Thu Dec 16, 2004 10:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: sitting around like a lemon
Replies: 7
Views: 4062

sitting around like a lemon

"Standing around like a lost lemon" is cited in Eric Partridge, "A Dictionary of Catch Phrases American and British" (1985) as a "more ladylike version" of "standing about like a spare prick at a wedding," defined as "unwanted, useless, idle, esp. with a hint of painfully embarrassed superfluity." h...