Search found 27158 matches

by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 2:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: You shall know them by their deeds
Replies: 5
Views: 2732

You shall know them by their deeds

And I thought 'You shall know them by their deeds' was something to do with estate-agents and big commissions.
Glad I kept my mouth shut.
Reply from Leighton Harris (Cambridge - England)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 1:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: You shall know them by their deeds
Replies: 5
Views: 2732

You shall know them by their deeds

Matthew 7:16 - Ye shall know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?
Matthew 7:20 - Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them.
Romans 2:6 - Who will render to every man according to his deeds

JF 12/17/2004
Reply from Jeff Freeman (Orlando, FL - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 1:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: You shall know them by their deeds
Replies: 5
Views: 2732

You shall know them by their deeds

Clarification; I know the meaning. I'm interested in the origin. -Pretty certain the phrase was around before there were such things as ready-made project teams.

I can use Google, too.

Vin¢
Reply from Vince Roemer (Indianapolis - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 1:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: You shall know them by their deeds
Replies: 5
Views: 2732

You shall know them by their deeds

ABEX Management Services - Your Ready-Made Project Team... To give due consideration to all stakeholders. The only mission statement a company needs: "You shall know them by their deeds". PK Shaw. ... http://www.abex.com.au/mission1.html - 5k - Cached - Similar pages Reply from dale hileman (Apple V...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 12:34 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 6157

profanity and sacrilige

Naton: Sorry if I misconstrued your thread. It appeared you were asking the difference between profanity and sacrilige
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 12:21 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 6157

profanity and sacrilige

An then there is the question of politically incorrect. Is calling a older person an "old grouch" a vulgarity?

Adam Crow, Alabama
Reply from ( - )
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 12:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 6157

profanity and sacrilige

wow, and I thought it was a pretty clear explanation...

JF 12/19/2004
Reply from Jeff Freeman (Orlando, FL - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:54 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 6157

profanity and sacrilige

Jeff, I am flattered; Nathon; it is possible we misconstrue your question. Jeff's example below seems perfectly ok "I took a sh*t" = profane "I took a sh*t" on Jesus = sacrilege Although sacriledge doesn't necessarily contain profanity. In the example above it obviously does; but it would be just as...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 11:41 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 6157

profanity and sacrilige

Well, I was looking forward to getting some help in here, but I better go look somewhere else. You've managed to tell me about swearing. Thanks. But then Leighton Harris says that sacrilige is taking the lords name in vain and this is the same as profanity, and then Jeff Freeman says that "i took a ...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:47 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 6157

profanity and sacrilige

So is 'I took a bl**dy sh*t on J*sus' swearing, profanity or sacrilegious?
Or all of the above?
It would certainly get me kicked out of Sunday school!

Reply from Leighton Harris (Cambridge - England)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:34 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 6157

profanity and sacrilige

Nathon,

"I took a sh*t" = profane
"I took a sh*t" on Jesus = sacrilege

Clear enough?

JF 12/17/2004
Reply from Jeff Freeman (Orlando, FL - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:21 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 6157

profanity and sacrilige

Thank you Jeff. I appreciate the time you must have spent looking for all this stuff and copying it, but I still would like somebody to explain to me what the difference is between sacred and profane. All these quotes are great, but if YOU can'tunderstand them enough to tell me the difference, how t...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 10:07 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 6157

profanity and sacrilige

Leighton,
I always thought that bloody refered to Christ's blood. I'd never heard your explanation before.

JF 12/17/2004
Reply from Jeff Freeman (Orlando, FL - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 9:54 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 6157

profanity and sacrilige

sac·ri·lege ( P ) Pronunciation Key (skr-lj) n. Desecration, profanation, misuse, or theft of something sacred. pro·fan·i·ty ( P ) Pronunciation Key (pr-fn-t, pr-) n. pl. pro·fan·i·ties The condition or quality of being profane. Abusive, vulgar, or irreverent language. The use of such language. Sour...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 9:41 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: profanity and sacrilige
Replies: 16
Views: 6157

profanity and sacrilige

Thanks Leighton Harris. What you said was interesting so thank you, but does that mean there is no difference between profanity and sacrilege? Are they the same thing, taking God's name in vain, or using it in swearing? If they mean the same, why is there two different words for it! Reply from Natho...