Search found 27158 matches

by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 8:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: son of a gun
Replies: 7
Views: 4890

son of a gun

Welcome back, Ken! Thanks for the detailed and prompt response. I figured it had something to do with illegitimate children of soldiers, but I had no idea it traced back so far.

Thanks again.
JF 12/19/2004
Reply from Jeff Freeman (Orlando, FL - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 7:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: son of a gun
Replies: 7
Views: 4890

son of a gun

Jeff, SON OF A GUN is now a euphemism for the nastier ‘son of a bitch’ as in ‘He was regarded as the worst son of a gun in the company.” But it is often also used – as my father used it – as a term of affectionate regard, as in ‘Why you little son of a gun!’ In addition to describing, as it original...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 7:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: alickadoo
Replies: 3
Views: 2937

alickadoo

I heard that Alickadoo came from a Post Office tale. A young man without all his cups in his cupboard returned home after finding his first job in ten years since leaving school. He proudly told his aging parents that he'd found employment at the local post office as a licker. They asked him, "What'...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 7:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: alickadoo
Replies: 3
Views: 2937

alickadoo

Thank you Ken and welcome back
I've been collecting for several years and still working on the obscurity factor. Your reply has been very helpful in this respect
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 6:47 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: alickadoo
Replies: 3
Views: 2937

alickadoo

Dale, Don’t construe this as an endorsement of the posting of near-useless words, but if you’re looking for obscure I think you’ve found it here. It looks like this little-used word comes from British sports slang and appears to have been born in the game of rugby, and apparently not to have travele...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 5:27 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Google / google
Replies: 12
Views: 3341

Google / google

Love it. I suppose the eschewless Joe was unavoidable there.
Reply from Eric Lamb (Fenton - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 5:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Google / google
Replies: 12
Views: 3341

Google / google

I think a googolplex plus 1 is "named" "Joe," but that could just be short for "Joseph"! *G*
Reply from ( - )
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 5:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Google / google
Replies: 12
Views: 3341

Google / google

An additional bit of trivia, though obvious, is that a googleplex is a 1 followed by one google 0's. Aside from infinity, this is the only other massive number I have seen named. Please respond to this if there are any bigger "named" numbers of which I am thusfar unaware. Reply from Eric Lamb (Fento...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 4:47 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Google / google
Replies: 12
Views: 3341

Google / google

L: Was doubfounded to get not a single hit on runcify or runciology but I am intrigued
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 4:34 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Google / google
Replies: 12
Views: 3341

Google / google

I know you're joking Tara, but thought I'd dig this up anyway as it's interesting if you didn't already know. The first practical application of runcification was in 1871 when Edward Lear noted that a runcible spoon could be used by owls and pussycats. ("They dined on mince, and slices of quince, / ...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 4:21 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Google / google
Replies: 12
Views: 3341

Google / google

I thought that a "spork" was really a runcible spoon...

Reply from Tara Taylor (Knoxville - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 4:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Google / google
Replies: 12
Views: 3341

Google / google

Small Connection,
My grangran used to was known as a 'pinch & glug cook', in that 'measure' in her way, was a "pinch of this dry stuff" and a "glug of that liquid stuff".
lneil
Reply from Louis Bussey (Boise - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 3:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Google / google
Replies: 12
Views: 3341

Google / google

The consensus among bloggers of my ilk, for what it's worth--which in't very much-- is that Google should be capitalized, even when it's used as a verb--DH
Reply from dale hileman (Apple Valley, CA - U.S.A.)
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 3:41 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Google / google
Replies: 12
Views: 3341

Google / google

Looks like it already has some other meanings already: According to Google History, the word google derives from a technical term in mathematics: Google is a play on the word googol, which was coined by Milton Sirotta, nephew of American mathematician Edward Kasner, and was popularized in the book, ...
by Archived Reply
Fri Dec 17, 2004 2:47 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: You shall know them by their deeds
Replies: 5
Views: 2524

You shall know them by their deeds

Jeff - Very much appreciated; exactly what I was looking for. :)
Vin¢
Reply from Vince Roemer (Indianapolis - U.S.A.)