Search found 2195 matches

by Stevenloan
Wed Aug 01, 2012 8:14 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Narrowly
Replies: 3
Views: 488

Re: Narrowly

- Edwin! Thanks so much for your post. I really appreciate it. Have a good day.

StevenLoan
by Stevenloan
Tue Jul 31, 2012 4:17 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Pile
Replies: 6
Views: 527

Pile

- What do you guys call this, a pile of fire or a heap of fire? I googled "a pile of fire" and "a heap of fire" but I found no good results. http://media.photobucket.com/image/fire ... e.jpg?o=14

Thanks a lot,

StevenLoan
by Stevenloan
Mon Jul 30, 2012 2:44 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Narrowly
Replies: 3
Views: 488

Narrowly

A: Have you fired your lazy secretary and got a new secretary yet? B: 1. I was close to fire him but in the end I changed my mind 2. I almost fired him but in the end I changed my mind 3. I nearly fired him but in the end I changed my mind 4. I narrowly fired him but in the end I changed my mind - D...
by Stevenloan
Sat Jul 28, 2012 6:03 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Age
Replies: 2
Views: 712

Age

- This conversation comes from the cartoon "Ice Age 3". This is between two weasels: A: Ladies first. B: Age before beauty. A: No pain no gain. B: What pain? A: Pushes B down a big hole B: Uses his tail to pull A down - What does "age before beauty" mean in this situation? Thanks a lot, StevenLoan
by Stevenloan
Thu Jul 26, 2012 8:29 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Summary
Replies: 3
Views: 248

Summary

"I've got bills to pay, I've got to have my car repaired and I've just lost my job - putting it in a nutshell I'm fed up!"

- Can I say "in short", "in a word", "in brief", "in sum", "in summary" as alternatives for "putting it in a nutshell" in this context?

Thanks a lot,

StevenLoan
by Stevenloan
Tue Jul 24, 2012 6:17 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Gallop
Replies: 5
Views: 1048

Gallop

- I have just watched a film. I heard A ask B "Do you know how to ride a horse at a gallop?". I know the meaning of "at a gallop". Could you please tell me the antonym of "at a gallop"? I googled the phrase but I didn't find any good results. By the way, can I say "at high speed" instead of "at a ga...
by Stevenloan
Tue Jul 24, 2012 3:49 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Worthwhile
Replies: 2
Views: 816

Worthwhile

1. It's ok to make mistakes sometimes. It's important that you have the courage to admit your mistakes and correct them. This way, you'll better yourself gradually . 2. It's alright to make mistakes sometimes. It's worthwhile that you have the valour to acknowledge your mistakes and fix them. This w...
by Stevenloan
Mon Jul 23, 2012 3:30 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Wavering
Replies: 2
Views: 502

Wavering

"I'm torn between studying and getting good grades or partying like a maniac and having a good time."

- I know "I'm torn" here means "I hesitate". But can I say "I'm really irresolute" or "I'm wavering" instead of "I'm torn" in this context?

Thanks a lot,

StevenLoan
by Stevenloan
Sat Jul 21, 2012 12:52 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Still with
Replies: 5
Views: 322

Still with

A and B are talking to C (A and B sit in the back, C sits in the front) but C says nothing so A asks C “Hey buddy, you still with us”?

- Does "You still with us?" in this context mean "Are you still listening to us??

Thanks a lot,

StevenLoan
by Stevenloan
Thu Jul 19, 2012 6:31 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Sidebar
Replies: 8
Views: 1122

Sidebar

- In this situation A, B, C and D are co-workers and they are talking to each other. Suddenly A says to B “sidebar” and B comes to A, they whisper something. I checked the meaning of “sidebar” at thefreedictionary.com and here are the results: 1. A short, often boxed auxiliary news story that is pri...
by Stevenloan
Wed Jul 18, 2012 10:18 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Slap
Replies: 1
Views: 288

Slap

A: Slaps B in the face.
B: What was that for?

- Are "What did you slap me for?" and "Why is that?" two alternatives for "What was that for?" in this situation?

Thanks a lot,

StevenLoan
by Stevenloan
Tue Jul 17, 2012 4:10 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Fast and Quick
Replies: 1
Views: 144

Fast and Quick

Brian: Hey Peter! Peter: Hey Brian. Our contract’s good for two more years. A: I need a word, in private. B: Make it fast. - I google "I need a word" but I found no results. Does it mean "We need to talk"? By the way, can I say "Make it quick" or "Just talk briefly" instead of "Make it fast" in this...
by Stevenloan
Sun Jul 15, 2012 2:59 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Hell of
Replies: 4
Views: 671

Hell of

- In this situation, A and B are friends.

A: If you want to work for me, then buy some new suits, comb your hair and shave.
B: That’s a hell of a lot to ask, man.

- Are there other polite ways to say instead of B's sentence in this context?

Thanks a lot,

StevenLoan
by Stevenloan
Sat Jul 14, 2012 5:07 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Wish
Replies: 6
Views: 346

Re: Wish

Erik and Edwin! Thanks so much for your compliments. By the way, everyone. Can I say "You're becoming a native speaker" or "You're becoming native" or "You're getting native" instead of "You're going native" like Edwin said in this context?

Thanks a lot,

StevenLoan
by Stevenloan
Fri Jul 13, 2012 9:52 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Wish
Replies: 6
Views: 346

Wish

A: I’m the best in my team. (and laughs out loud) B: (Frowns) Oh you wish. - I just can remember this short conversation in a movie. I googled "Oh you wish" but I found no results. I guess it has a figurative meaning here and I guess it means "Oh dream on, you're not that good". Is it correct, nativ...