Search found 8260 matches

by Erik_Kowal
Thu Mar 19, 2020 3:39 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: League
Replies: 2
Views: 3148

Re: League

The phrase is indeed often used in that context, but it can be applied more generally too.

I suspect the term originated in sports, where groups of teams of roughly similar ability are often organized as a hierarchy of leagues.
by Erik_Kowal
Tue Mar 17, 2020 11:06 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Charge way
Replies: 3
Views: 3327

Re: Charge way

Trolley's right.

I suppose the "tine of need" is where you find yourself when you've been forced to fork out over the odds.
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Mar 16, 2020 6:07 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Across the desk
Replies: 6
Views: 4441

Re: Across the desk

If I was asked to describe what is happening in the photo, I would say "The woman has fallen asleep at her desk" or "The woman is asleep at her desk". If I particularly wanted to emphasize her posture, I would say "The woman is lying [asleep] across her desk". The form "laying" is also often used, e...
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Mar 14, 2020 5:29 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: A lesson to
Replies: 3
Views: 4341

Re: A lesson to

My sense of the difference in the way these expressions are used is that the admonitory aspect of "lesson to" is stronger than with "lesson for". But they are both grammatically standard terms.
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Mar 09, 2020 4:51 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Splash water
Replies: 2
Views: 5470

Re: Splash water

Yes.

I would argue that in this case, their lack of considerateness towards the pedestrian is more significant than their lack of common sense.
by Erik_Kowal
Thu Mar 05, 2020 5:25 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: House
Replies: 4
Views: 7657

Re: House

There are two possible terms that both seem equally valid to me, namely maisonette, and terraced house (in British English) or row house (in American English). In the US it might also be called a town house. According to this page, "The term ‘maisonette’ refers to an apartment on two or more storeys...
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Mar 01, 2020 5:07 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Coloring books
Replies: 2
Views: 6597

Re: Coloring books

They are implying that AOC's mentality, temperament or level of understanding is that of a young child (i.e. like that of someone who would be attracted to a colouring book).
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Feb 28, 2020 3:12 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Apples
Replies: 5
Views: 7553

Re: Apples

As far as I can make out, it's the fruit of a species of ziziphus, otherwise known as the jujube, green jujube or Chinese date.
by Erik_Kowal
Tue Feb 25, 2020 4:09 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Think pass the nose
Replies: 3
Views: 7197

Re: Think pass the nose

There's a typo in the transcript. The term should be "think past [i.e. beyond] the nose on one's face".
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:19 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Bridge
Replies: 3
Views: 7399

Re: Bridge

The photo depicts the footbridge across Gaitanes Gorge near Ronda in Andalusia, southern Spain.
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Feb 21, 2020 10:14 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke
Replies: 9
Views: 10952

Re: Danish pastry - and Rosinenschnecke

I wonder whether those "snails" exist in the English speaking world. And if so, what is their name? In Danish, those spiral buns are called kanelsnegle (literally "cinnamon snails). In English, I would call them cinnamon rolls, though according to this Wikipedia page they also go by the names cinna...
by Erik_Kowal
Thu Feb 20, 2020 9:36 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Powder one's nose
Replies: 3
Views: 7164

Re: Powder one's nose

For users of cocaine, this would be a direct description of their intention.
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Feb 16, 2020 12:27 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Bob
Replies: 4
Views: 8373

Re: Bob

Good question. It's not a standard generic epithet for addressing someone in a demeaning and/or (over-)familiar manner like Bud, buddy, Bubba, friend, pal, mate or sunshine. The only possibility I can think of is that the person being addressed is called Robert, of which the variant "Bob" is a pet f...
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Feb 15, 2020 4:45 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Deadly gas
Replies: 3
Views: 7761

Re: Deadly gas

Besides break wind, pass gas is the usual euphemism for farting.

In English there is a type of fart popularly (poopularly?) known as "silent but deadly", which the writer hints at in his description. But pass deadly gas is this writer's coinage. It isn't a standard term.
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Feb 14, 2020 3:54 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Folded like a cheap xxxx
Replies: 3
Views: 8105

Re: Folded like a cheap xxxx

When I lived in North America (as Trolley does now), I too came across this expression from time to time. A cheap suit is likely to be made of cheap fabric, which in turn is likely to be rather thin and flimsy. By contrast, an expensive suit is usually made of sturdier fabric, such as wool. A suit m...