Search found 8260 matches

by Erik_Kowal
Sun Apr 19, 2020 12:59 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Come vs Go
Replies: 2
Views: 1326

Re: Come vs Go

I would have said "going there ". "Here" refers to the current location of the speaker, which makes no sense unless they are physically at the repair shop while describing the oil change -- which we know is not the case, because the speaker went there "this morning", and it doesn't take very long to...
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Apr 18, 2020 2:01 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Buildings
Replies: 2
Views: 1281

Re: Buildings

I would call that a skybridge, skyway or skywalk. It's remarkable how much inspiration the architect of these towers was able to draw from the cutter block of an electric shaver: https://www.shavers.co.uk/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/380x/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/1/3/13650.jpg
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Apr 18, 2020 5:19 am
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Coronavirus guidelines
Replies: 1
Views: 1666

Coronavirus guidelines

I'm passing on some useful guidelines that should clear up any confusion and misconceptions about the coronavirus: ----------- 1. Basically, you can't leave the house for any reason, but if you have to, then you can. 2. Masks are useless, but maybe you have to wear one. Or maybe not, depending on wh...
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Apr 17, 2020 4:13 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Sky high walking
Replies: 2
Views: 1615

Re: Sky high walking

There is an adjectival phrase "sky high", which in this context means "heavily intoxicated by a psychoactive substance". (A close synonym is the phrase "high as a kite").

So "sky high" and "walking" (= who are walking) are two different sense units.
by Erik_Kowal
Wed Apr 15, 2020 11:00 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Ships
Replies: 4
Views: 1838

Re: Ships

Those are mooring posts.

Incidentally, those are not ships but boats (specifically, they are cabin cruisers).

Ships are large vessels defined primarily in terms of their size, and secondarily by the fact that they are mostly seagoing vessels rather than freshwater craft.
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Apr 13, 2020 4:12 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Bland
Replies: 3
Views: 1700

Re: Bland

To my mind, bland refers to the characteristics of the inn being described.

Boring describes the effect of this blandness on the mood of its perceiver.

So there is a difference, albeit a subtle one.
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Apr 12, 2020 6:40 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Long scary ladder
Replies: 4
Views: 1927

Re: Long scary ladder

I would call them steps, though ladder would certainly be understood.

The more horizontal section below is a walkway — in other words, an artificial path constructed to allow walkers to cross difficult, hazardous or easily damaged / disturbed terrain (such as in a nature reserve).
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Apr 11, 2020 5:59 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: A quick dollar
Replies: 2
Views: 1537

Re: A quick dollar

It roughly means "He is not motivated by an intention to take financial advantage". ("Out to [do X]" = "intent on [doing X]").

My comment: Evidently Apple (the manufacturer of the overpriced iPad range of products) is the only profiteer in this scenario.
by Erik_Kowal
Sat Apr 11, 2020 2:39 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: The Internet
Replies: 2
Views: 1500

Re: The Internet

The Internet "going out" (which I think in this sense is chiefly a North American usage) can best be compared with a fire that has burned itself out, provided the analogy is not pushed too far. :D The term is also frequently used to refer to electricity outages or blackouts ("The power's gone out ag...
by Erik_Kowal
Fri Apr 10, 2020 5:54 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Third
Replies: 2
Views: 1658

Re: Third

To second something that someone else has proposed is a procedural custom in settings where decisions are voted on. Often, for a proposal to qualify for a vote, it must be put forward by a proposer and endorsed by a seconder, who is in effect saying "I think this is a good idea, or at least an idea ...
by Erik_Kowal
Wed Apr 08, 2020 1:55 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Camping
Replies: 3
Views: 1534

Re: Camping

Yes. Though it would come a bit more naturally to me to say "Anyone who camps on a cliff like this must be sick of living."

Where is that remarkable cliff?
by Erik_Kowal
Tue Apr 07, 2020 5:12 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Wedding
Replies: 4
Views: 1571

Re: Wedding

In your situation, I would probably ask them something like "Are you thinking of going for a big fancy wedding or a small intimate one?"
by Erik_Kowal
Mon Apr 06, 2020 4:49 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Decoration
Replies: 2
Views: 1294

Re: Decoration

Is this a unique construction, or are there lots of these in Vietnam? I've never seen anything resembling it anywhere in the West, so I think native speakers of English would either choose to use the Vietnamese name for one of these (perhaps "ghế vòng tròn tre"?), invent a name from scratch, or else...
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Apr 05, 2020 10:09 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: It's not flooded with water
Replies: 7
Views: 1964

Re: It's not flooded with water

Quite right, Bob. I felt that 'walkway' was somehow wrong, but you nailed it.

Thanks. :D
by Erik_Kowal
Sun Apr 05, 2020 5:57 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: It's not flooded with water
Replies: 7
Views: 1964

Re: It's not flooded with water

I would probably say something like "You can get to the small island from the mainland along a connecting walkway that {isn't submerged / is above the water}".

One could quibble that it doesn't completely meet the definition of an island, because it isn't entirely surrounded by water. :)