Search found 252 matches

by JANE DOErell
Sat Jul 07, 2007 2:10 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "Thoughts and prayers are with --- "
Replies: 30
Views: 7809

"Thoughts and prayers are with --- "

I've no problem with the interpretations or commentary of the phrase but I was more curious as to how old the specific wording might be. -ed [The earliest "thoughts and prayers are with ---" I can find is in the Google News Archive 1913. It is the "thoughts and prayers are with ---" that we hear ove...
by JANE DOErell
Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:25 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "Thoughts and prayers are with --- "
Replies: 30
Views: 7809

"Thoughts and prayers are with --- "

Over at http://fray.slate.com/discuss/forums/thread/103510.aspx someone asks about "thoughts and prayers": Does anyone know, if it's possible to pin down the blame to one source, the origin of the now-meaningless, perfunctory "our thoughts and prayers are with (insert victim here)"? I too have been ...
by JANE DOErell
Thu Jun 28, 2007 3:41 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Announcing news before it happens
Replies: 22
Views: 5215

Announcing news before it happens

I personally know a few people who are expected to release tomorrows news today to accommodate press deadlines. For example the state law says a city budget must be published on May 15 so it is given to the newspapers on May 14 so they can meet their deadlines at the printer. Then the TV stations th...
by JANE DOErell
Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:15 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: hot
Replies: 9
Views: 2225

hot

Dale, as one curmudgeonly geezer to another, I suggest you do the search and give us a link with a teaser quote, at a minimum. And with regard to "See my suggestion in bombardier above." you can say "See my suggestion in bombardier currently nearby." if you really feel you need to reference the "bom...
by JANE DOErell
Sun Jun 17, 2007 6:55 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: who is cooter brown? may be a southern thing...
Replies: 12
Views: 3798

who is cooter brown? may be a southern thing...

Word-detective says the question will drive you to drink.
g
by JANE DOErell
Fri Jun 15, 2007 6:26 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: bombardier
Replies: 23
Views: 4842

bombardier

Onelook's quick definitions give two nouns: # noun: the member of a bomber crew responsible for using the bombsight and releasing the bombs on the target # noun: a noncommissioned officer in the British artillery AHD adds to these: Archaic A soldier in the artillery. and ETYMOLOGY: French, from Old ...
by JANE DOErell
Thu Jun 14, 2007 4:12 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: dust-up
Replies: 5
Views: 2687

dust-up

From Guardian Unlimited by way of news.google: A decision by Google to hold a party in the middle of an eBay conference has prompted a furious dust-up... Dictionaries say a "dust-up" is an argument or fight (This was fairly obvious from the context.) but then I became curious as to why an argument w...
by JANE DOErell
Sun Jun 03, 2007 5:00 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Appearing to be conspirators when not conspirators
Replies: 9
Views: 3936

Appearing to be conspirators when not conspirators

Does English have a word for people who are not conspirators acting in such a way as to appear to be conspirators? I was reminded of this possibility again when book reviews in Slate states "....—a second gunman. And—by definition—a conspiracy. ...." There is no reason why two gunmen cannot arrive a...
by JANE DOErell
Wed May 23, 2007 5:51 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Nana Tootsie
Replies: 4
Views: 3581

Nana Tootsie

There is a site out there english.cri.cn which has a poem with the line

"It's a little Nana Tootsie for my taste. What? You know, showy, flashy, froufrou. "Froufrou"?

Do a google for chienglish "nana tootsie". I'm not sure this helps. It is just has something to mull over.
by JANE DOErell
Fri May 18, 2007 9:07 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: pull up stakes
Replies: 1
Views: 1039

pull up stakes

At http://books.google.com/books?id=SYrJZLjgDmIC&pg=PA27&lpg=PA27&dq=etymology+%22pull+up+stakes%22&source=web&ots=_t79_Cxpni&sig=Si5qcpDfXoKZUoi_uxiDILSdqa4#PPA27,M1 I found a book that said that "pull up stakes" could be dated to 1640. I discovered this via Google's new scheme to include book sear...
by JANE DOErell
Fri May 18, 2007 4:57 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: prom bid / prom / promenade
Replies: 18
Views: 7907

prom bid / prom / promenade

Etymology online is not much help:
"student formal dance in celebration of graduation," 1894, Amer.Eng. shortened form of promenade (q.v.).
but at least they give a date and say it is American. I would have sworn someone, here, Safire or someone discussed it recently but I cannot find it.
by JANE DOErell
Mon May 07, 2007 8:09 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: “the more things change, the more they remain the same.”
Replies: 11
Views: 2765

“the more things change, the more they remain the same.”

The experssion “the more things change, the more they remain the same” always struck me as being rather silly, like a juvenile riddle, a poor effort to sound like Lewis Carroll or something.

Is it more profound in French?
by JANE DOErell
Sun May 06, 2007 2:55 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: taking the mickey out
Replies: 8
Views: 2585

taking the mickey out

In todays Washingtonpost.com, http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/05/05/AR2007050500981_3.html?hpid=topnews In a story about Prince Philip: "But there are times when he is over the top," Dampier said. "I mean, we've got a whole series in there, about four or five occasions, whe...
by JANE DOErell
Sun May 06, 2007 1:33 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: “the more things change, the more they remain the same.”
Replies: 11
Views: 2765

“the more things change, the more they remain the same.”

In todays nytimes.com (Linkes to nytimes.com become invalid quickly so I won't clutter this site with a link.) in a story about the French elections:
It was the French, after all, who first observed, “the more things change, the more they remain the same.”
Is this really from the French?
by JANE DOErell
Thu May 03, 2007 8:30 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: posthuman
Replies: 3
Views: 1349

posthuman

Your Sterling, Schismatrix, 1985, is the best I can do. It starts appearing in Google News Archives about 1987. You might find some help with early usage of the word there.