Search found 190 matches

by kagriffy
Fri Jan 06, 2006 9:17 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Americanisms
Replies: 58
Views: 15269

Americanisms

Touche, Russ! I really don't think the British can criticize our pronunciations TOO much when they have the examples you cited. *G* (On a related note, if I happen to ask for Worcestershire Sauce, which I pronounce "wooster-shur," at a restaurant, I get very strange looks from the wait staff. Most p...
by kagriffy
Fri Jan 06, 2006 7:16 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Americanisms
Replies: 58
Views: 15269

Americanisms

Dale, I don't know about you, but I've never pronounced "imaginary" with a long "I" sound, nor have I ever accented the second syllable of "recognize." Colin, I've heard "Iraq" pronounced as "eye-RACK," "ee-RACK," "eye-ROCK," and "ee-ROCK." There doesn't seem to be any consistency, even by news anch...
by kagriffy
Wed Dec 14, 2005 9:53 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: A sound you do not notice until it stops.
Replies: 17
Views: 4530

A sound you do not notice until it stops.

While "singlet" may be an old-fashioned word for a man's undershirt, Shelley, it is a current word used for the one-piece leotard-like outfits worn by wrestlers.
by kagriffy
Wed Dec 14, 2005 9:45 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: scratcher
Replies: 5
Views: 1691

scratcher

No, really, Ken, don't hold back! Tell us what you REALLY think!!! *G*
by kagriffy
Fri Dec 02, 2005 4:59 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: word consisting of two words
Replies: 1
Views: 1088

word consisting of two words

I believe the term you are looking for is "compound word." That term describes words like "classroom," "schoolhouse," "boyfriend," etc.
by kagriffy
Wed Nov 30, 2005 7:39 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Origins of the word "THE"
Replies: 29
Views: 5450

Origins of the word "THE"

Although I had to read Dale's first sentence a few times myself, I finally figured it out. He means that THE animal pound has an employee named "Cat." (Although it's usually spelled "Kat," it is a fairly common nickname for a Catherine/Kathryn/Kathleen, etc.) I still don't think you can SUBSTITUTE "...
by kagriffy
Tue Nov 29, 2005 6:57 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Origins of the word "THE"
Replies: 29
Views: 5450

Origins of the word "THE"

Why do we need it at all? Well, let's try your second sentence without it: ". . . tracking down why word exists in first place." Why WHAT word exists? If "word" exists in first place, what is in second place, third place, etc.? See, "the" can make quite a bit of difference in our understanding. But ...
by kagriffy
Mon Nov 21, 2005 7:16 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Is there anything in the wind...
Replies: 29
Views: 4488

Is there anything in the wind...

Marge Simpson: "Bart, run like the WHINED!" Lisa Simpson: "Mom, that's 'run like the WINNED.'" Marge: "Sorry. I've only seen it in print!"

I know it doesn't add to the discussion, but I thought it was appropriate. *G*
by kagriffy
Mon Nov 14, 2005 7:04 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: legal limit
Replies: 45
Views: 12728

legal limit

Dale, I'll agree that a driver exceeding the "legal limit" MIGHT imply a DUI situation, but only if the "legal limit" were unqualified. In my example, I said they had exceeded "the legal limit FOR CONSECUTIVE DRIVING HOURS . . . ." I really don't think a "typical" reader would assume that I meant a ...
by kagriffy
Mon Nov 14, 2005 1:36 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: legal limit
Replies: 45
Views: 12728

legal limit

Dale, you seem to assume that "legal limit" can refer only to DUI/DWI. Although that may be the most common connotation, it is by no means the only "legal limit." For example, if a fisherman exceeds the legal limit by catching too many fish in one day, I don't believe anyone (besides you) would even...
by kagriffy
Sun Nov 13, 2005 11:06 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: legal limit
Replies: 45
Views: 12728

legal limit

How about this: Many drivers are exceeding the legal limit for consecutive driving hours, because they are not taking the legally mandated rest periods. This seems to clarify the problem fairly well. The legal limit (maximum) which the drivers are "exceeding" is the number of consecutive hours drivi...
by kagriffy
Thu Nov 10, 2005 10:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Reapt or Reaped
Replies: 12
Views: 3733

Reapt or Reaped

Springfield has a language all its own in some respects. I've lived in Illinois all my life, but I had to learn a few new terms when I moved here after college. For example, what I always called a "concrete block" (the big blocks made of concrete [hence the name] and used for foundations) is called ...
by kagriffy
Thu Nov 10, 2005 7:17 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Reapt or Reaped
Replies: 12
Views: 3733

Reapt or Reaped

There's a long-standing joke in these parts that you might be from Springfield (Illinois, that is) if you go to Chicago and no one will give you a "sody"! Growing up in South-Central Illinois, though, we never referred to either "soda/sody" or "pop"; we just used "Coke" as a generic catch-all encomp...
by kagriffy
Thu Nov 10, 2005 7:09 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Get 'er Done
Replies: 6
Views: 4005

Get 'er Done

And in keeping with LTCG's redneck background, the phrase should really be spelled "Git" (regardless of how the last two parts are spelled). In Redneckese, the word "get" is pronounced with a very distinct short "I" sound. I suspect if you do a search spelling it "Git" you'll GET quite a few more hi...
by kagriffy
Tue Nov 08, 2005 8:58 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: stupid vs stupidity
Replies: 4
Views: 1250

stupid vs stupidity

If you want a clear picture of how stupidity works, just do a web search on "Illinois politics"!!!