Search found 2207 matches

by trolley
Thu Apr 26, 2018 7:06 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Grenades
Replies: 4
Views: 1127

Re: Grenades

I imagine brevity was of the utmost importance when a hand-bomb landed in your trench
"Frag!".................BOOM!
"Grenade!".....BOOM!
"Potato-MasBOOM!
by trolley
Wed Apr 25, 2018 10:10 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: spoony
Replies: 13
Views: 3455

Re: spoony

"Another "spoon" is a verb referring to love-making or necking. That use of "spoon" may stem from a Welsh custom in which an engaged man presented his fiancé with an elaborately carved wooden spoon." I am surprised that they went all the way to Wales to come up with that "may stem from". It's easier...
by trolley
Sat Apr 21, 2018 4:51 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Mountains
Replies: 5
Views: 1155

Re: Mountains

Those are my stomping grounds, Steve...after a 90 minute ferry trip.
by trolley
Fri Apr 20, 2018 6:13 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Mountains
Replies: 5
Views: 1155

Re: Mountains

Steve, there are many different things you could call that. The actual structure, I would call a “deck” or “platform”. An area set aside for viewing some natural splendor is often called a “lookout” or a “view-point” (but they may or may not be man-built). If I were to describe it to someone I would...
by trolley
Thu Apr 19, 2018 10:40 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: shine one's knuckles
Replies: 3
Views: 1272

Re: shine one's knuckles

Good call, Erik. Polishing up her brass knuckles makes a little more sense.
by trolley
Thu Apr 19, 2018 8:50 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: shine one's knuckles
Replies: 3
Views: 1272

shine one's knuckles

This line is from a news article I was reading on Rabble.ca. “It won’t work, you know. She’s tougher than you. When Canada’s scumbags come at her, she shines her knuckles.” She does what? and why? It would seem that she is shining her knuckles in preparation for a fight. I am a big fan of martial ar...
by trolley
Thu Apr 19, 2018 1:56 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: epistemic closure
Replies: 6
Views: 1732

Re: epistemic closure

I thought it was going to be some sort of surgical procedure.
"Even though they used an epistemic closure, I still got a nasty infection!"
by trolley
Thu Apr 19, 2018 1:51 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Snow
Replies: 2
Views: 774

Re: Snow

Sounds perfectly natural, Steve. You'll probably be developing some sort of English accent soon. :D
by trolley
Tue Apr 17, 2018 3:02 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Khaki/Kharki
Replies: 4
Views: 1495

Re: Khaki/Kharki

Thanks, Phil. Interesting stuff. I was familiar with the habit of pronouncing an “r” with a vowel sound. Someone in Boston might “pawk thu cah at the bah” if they were stopping in for a drink. Somehow, it never occurred to me that it could happen in the reverse.
by trolley
Mon Apr 16, 2018 11:50 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Khaki/Kharki
Replies: 4
Views: 1495

Khaki/Kharki

I was reminiscing the other day about some strange pronunciations my mom used. She was raised in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The Canadian east coast has a very unique accent, at times being mistaken for Irish or Scottish. The North American pronunciation of Khaki is “ ka ckie” and the British is more like...
by trolley
Mon Apr 16, 2018 7:35 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: To be determined to
Replies: 8
Views: 1532

Re: To be determined to

From what I can gather, "hell bent" is an Americanism meaning "determined to do something, and to hell with the consequences." Hell bent for leather may be a combination of "hell bent" and "hell for leather". One source says "hell for leather" is a British expression coined by Rudyard Kipling and me...
by trolley
Thu Apr 12, 2018 10:20 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: want it new
Replies: 7
Views: 1334

Re: want it new

"I wanted my hands clean for my meeting with the boss" leaves me wondering what you were guilty of. You could be washing your hands metaphorically...or is that idiomatically?
by trolley
Thu Apr 12, 2018 4:29 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Careful
Replies: 2
Views: 797

Re: Careful

It could be used correctly but it is not anything a native speaker would ever say. There is a fairly set, natural response that you could use. Most people do.
"You are always too careful."
"One can never be too careful."
by trolley
Mon Apr 09, 2018 6:16 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Babies' clothes
Replies: 6
Views: 1171

Re: Babies' clothes

That's odd. I was positive there was a special name that I just couldn't remember. Digging around on the internet, I can only find "bodysuit" but I'm sure we called them something else.
by trolley
Sat Apr 07, 2018 4:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: truckle
Replies: 3
Views: 1163

Re: truckle

I have to admit, I was unaware of any definition of "truckle" until just now. The cheese definition seems to be well used.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truckle