Search found 2627 matches

by trolley
Mon Sep 07, 2020 2:24 am
Forum: Oh, and have you read...?
Topic: rewrite
Replies: 0
Views: 5730

rewrite

On a church signpost (marquee?) in my town...
Thou shalt not COVID thy neighbour's wife.
Thou shalt not COVID thy neighbour's goods
WEAR A MASK!
by trolley
Mon Sep 07, 2020 1:18 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: as well as
Replies: 1
Views: 2312

Re: as well as

I think A,B,C and D are correct, if you mean he can perform both actions. If you add "he" to C and D..."he can dance as well as he can sing" or "he dances as well as he sings", then he does both equally well. E and F don't seem to work, for me.
by trolley
Sun Sep 06, 2020 5:11 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: a question of -ed suffix pronunciation evolution
Replies: 2
Views: 2589

Re: a question of -ed suffix pronunciation evolution

It seems that the stressed ed ending is usually reserved for adjectives. When some of those same words can act as a verbs you can have a difference in pronunciation blessed...bless-ed winged...wing-ed wicked...wick-ed aged...ag-ed How is it decided which words do this? I don't know if there is a rul...
by trolley
Sat Sep 05, 2020 2:04 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: knew not
Replies: 2
Views: 2455

Re: knew not

I'm not sure if they are grammatically correct (today) but I think they could use a comma or two sprinkled over them. They may imply a great number but we'd need a little more context to be sure. Could the journalist have written one or two books? Yes, or he may have written twenty, or maybe none at...
by trolley
Fri Aug 28, 2020 8:15 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Let me take care of it
Replies: 4
Views: 3423

Re: Let me take care of it

They are equally acceptable. There are many ways to convey this idea such as "you can get it next time" or "I've got this". Another, that may sound a little odd, is "your money is no good here". Even though it may sound a little like an insult, what it really means is that although you are welcome t...
by trolley
Wed Aug 26, 2020 5:05 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: I've got a pie in the oven
Replies: 6
Views: 3682

Re: I've got a pie in the oven

Having "a bun in the oven" is an idiom, meaning to be pregnant. That immediately popped into my head when I read "I've got a pie in the oven". It seems like something that could easily be misquoted by someone whose first language is not English.
by trolley
Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:57 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: I've got a pie in the oven
Replies: 6
Views: 3682

Re: I've got a pie in the oven

When I read that title, I thought Steve was about to become a father :o
by trolley
Sun Aug 23, 2020 4:35 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Feedback
Replies: 5
Views: 3764

Re: Feedback

I'd never heard it used that way. I did, however, find several examples of "feedbacks" on line, just now. Many of the examples had to do with the study of global weather. "Climate feedbacks" seems to be a thing (or things?)
by trolley
Sat Aug 22, 2020 6:03 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: kinds of birds
Replies: 3
Views: 3251

Re: kinds of birds

If either, or both (birds and kinds) are plural, I would say "live" rather than "lives".
by trolley
Fri Aug 21, 2020 1:45 am
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Fish and Chips
Replies: 1
Views: 2442

Fish and Chips

I called my wife and asked to her to pick up Fish and Chips on her way home. She hung up on me. I think she's still upset that she allowed me to name the kids...
by trolley
Thu Aug 20, 2020 11:49 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Christ above
Replies: 7
Views: 4441

Re: Christ above

It’s an interjection or exclamation of surprise, anger, disgust, excitement, etc. There are a ton of them… Yikes!...wow!...holy smoke!…shit!...blimey!...jumpin’ Jehosophat! They run the gamut from cute and harmless to profane and offensive. Tread lightly around these things (or just avoid using them...
by trolley
Fri Aug 14, 2020 5:54 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Easier on gas
Replies: 2
Views: 2437

Re: Easier on gas

To "go easy" or "be easier" on someone or something means to be gentle on. In this case, a car that is easier on gas is a car that uses less gas.
"My new eight cylinder truck is much harder on gas than my old six-banger"
by trolley
Thu Aug 13, 2020 4:30 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Cakewalk
Replies: 5
Views: 3643

Re: Cakewalk

In this case, they are referring to definition # 1. I was a little confused when I read that second definition. I had no idea about the African American connection to "cake walk". I have ever only known it as a children's game played at carnivals, picnics or community gatherings. Kids would walk aro...
by trolley
Tue Aug 11, 2020 5:00 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Bugger
Replies: 10
Views: 5318

Re: Bugger

The term "bugger" is pretty common in Canada (but it seems you're more likely to hear it from someone who is over fifty years of age). It is often used as a mild "swear word". If something is broken it is "buggered" or "buggered up". It can be used in reference to something that you are not going to...
by trolley
Thu Jul 30, 2020 5:28 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Sounds like a plan
Replies: 27
Views: 24452

Re: Sounds like a plan

Ah, we were all so much more fun when we were younger.