Search found 545 matches

by zmjezhd
Sat Nov 27, 2010 4:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Truck stop: bookstore?
Replies: 9
Views: 2828

Re: Truck stop: bookstore?

Your quotation does not mention bookstore in it. Elided?
by zmjezhd
Tue Nov 02, 2010 1:23 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: The BBC's use of quotation marks
Replies: 27
Views: 20545

Re: The BBC's use of quotation marks

The 2009-12-28 to Yuma has just left the station.

Unfortunately, thereafter, it came to a full stop.
by zmjezhd
Fri Oct 29, 2010 2:20 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Hindi and Urdu words in the English language
Replies: 17
Views: 11420

Re: Hindi and Urdu words in the English language

True, Edwin. It's not really borrowing in the financial cents.
by zmjezhd
Thu Oct 28, 2010 1:24 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Hindi and Urdu words in the English language
Replies: 17
Views: 11420

Re: Hindi and Urdu words in the English language

I'd say that avatar, dharma, dharna, guru, kama, karma, pundit, and yoga were borrowed from Sanskrit and not Hindi/Urdu.
by zmjezhd
Sat Oct 23, 2010 7:15 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: How does one pronounce the name Schygulla?
Replies: 16
Views: 8704

Re: How does one pronounce the name Schygulla?

I'd pronounce the y as though it was a ü in German. And the a as a schwa /ə/.
by zmjezhd
Sun Oct 17, 2010 6:51 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Upbringing & Bringing up
Replies: 13
Views: 3647

Re: Upbringing & Bringing up

upbringing

Uprising < 'to rise up'.
by zmjezhd
Sat Oct 16, 2010 3:40 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: get one's rocks off
Replies: 8
Views: 7359

Re: Get one's rocks off

The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English has a citation from 1969, but Bob Dylan wrote a song entitled Get Your Rocks Off earlier that was covered by Manfred Mann in the '70s..
by zmjezhd
Fri Oct 15, 2010 5:46 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Noble and luxurious
Replies: 6
Views: 2809

Re: Noble and luxurious

While some might understand what you mean by "set of clothes", it's a strange sounding collocation. how about "outfit"? Or you want to be more highfalutin', "ensemble".

Your outfit is rather stunning.

The whole "luxurious and noble" remark could seem a bit sarcastic.
by zmjezhd
Sun Oct 10, 2010 3:34 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: The maiden's tense
Replies: 11
Views: 2145

Re: The maiden's tense

What if Dawson keeps her maiden name instead of changing her surname to her husband's? To my way of thinking, though, a maiden name does not change. If Dawson marries Mr Torres, she wouldn't say "My maiden name was Dawson, but now it's Torres." I can see why somebody would say is rather than was , b...
by zmjezhd
Sun Oct 10, 2010 3:28 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Non-backshifted 'Will'
Replies: 4
Views: 2173

Re: Non-backshifted 'Will'

Backshifting need not occur if the reported speech event has not yet occurred or is still true. 1. He's studying linguistics. (Implies that he still is.) 2. He said he is studying linguistics. (Implies he still is.) 3. He said he was studying linguistics. (Implies he's not studying the subject anymo...
by zmjezhd
Wed Oct 06, 2010 1:27 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: So forgetful
Replies: 2
Views: 1916

Re: So forgetful

Happy belated birthday.
by zmjezhd
Sun Sep 26, 2010 5:57 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: intern/extern
Replies: 10
Views: 4004

Re: intern/extern

There are other words with the suffix - tern , e.g. t OED has sempitern 'next', ("1866 Blackmore Cradock Nowell xxviii, That asylum is inviolable and sempitern, I hope."); but, I am not sure if altern belongs to this group. English tern , OTOH, is from Old Norse ON. þerna 'tern, sea swallow'. Englis...
by zmjezhd
Thu Sep 23, 2010 7:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: intern/extern
Replies: 10
Views: 4004

Re: intern/extern

Extern is cited in the OED going back into the 16th century. It's the opposite of an intern, i.e., somebody associated with an institution (e.g., a hospital) but not residing there. I have the feeling that the meaning has changed a bit. These days an extern is somebody who subs for a vacationing in...
by zmjezhd
Thu Sep 23, 2010 5:31 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: beaned, beanie, and baseball
Replies: 26
Views: 14114

Re: beaned, beanie, and baseball

I would call the Australian beanie a ski cap or tuque. Woz, are you suggesting an Australian English origin for the word beanie?
by zmjezhd
Tue Sep 21, 2010 2:59 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: beaned, beanie, and baseball
Replies: 26
Views: 14114

Re: Beaned and baseball

A related article also claims that the term “beanus” referred, not only to the first year students but also to those little skull caps they wore. I doubt it. The word is three syllables in Latin, and none of the books or articles I looked at mention that. I think it's just folk etymological wishful...