Search found 545 matches

by zmjezhd
Mon Feb 21, 2011 3:49 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: There going there
Replies: 15
Views: 3117

Re: There going there

Perhaps two-dotted ellipsoidal marks are being used to extend the traditional use of ellipses (i.e. to indicate an omission or pause). The true traditionalist would never dream of using a correct ellipsis with three dots to indicate anything but a pause or omission. The two dots thus indubitably in...
by zmjezhd
Mon Feb 21, 2011 2:47 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: There going there
Replies: 15
Views: 3117

Re: There going there

.. the sadder people are those who seek to justify acceptance of these examples of slothful use of the English language as being acceptable examples of linguistic change or who trot out some research paper to say that it all is totally irrelevant in the modern context .. I don't think it's really a...
by zmjezhd
Fri Feb 18, 2011 4:03 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: There going there
Replies: 15
Views: 3117

Re: There going there

I blame the Internet (earlier comic books, TV, radio, penny dreadfuls, universal education, lending libraries, etc.).
by zmjezhd
Sat Jan 29, 2011 5:31 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Nudity across cultures
Replies: 25
Views: 11371

Re: Nudity across cultures

So I thank "zmjezhd" for giving me some education this morning. Oh, never mind, I've just been grumpy all week. Your comment upon my home state just touched a raw nerve. Anyway, yes, it is interesting that the male chauvinist meaning has eclipsed the earlier one(s). (I don't know which definition h...
by zmjezhd
Fri Jan 28, 2011 9:40 pm
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Nudity across cultures
Replies: 25
Views: 11371

Re: Nudity across cultures

Can you say California?

Can you say provincial chauvinism? Harrumph!
by zmjezhd
Mon Jan 10, 2011 4:59 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: To name for?
Replies: 11
Views: 4609

Re: To name for?

For what it's worth, the new-fangled Google n-gram viewer gives these results for "named for", "named after", and "named from": (link).
by zmjezhd
Mon Jan 03, 2011 3:36 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: New Decade
Replies: 3
Views: 2854

Re: New Decade

11 years long As there was no year zero in decades run from 1 to 10. The usual explanation one hears is that 2000 was the last year of the last decade of the last century of the last millennium. You are welcome to ignore this stricture. I myself prefer psychological decades. So the Sixties ran from...
by zmjezhd
Sat Jan 01, 2011 6:50 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: verbed nouns [denominative/denominal verbs]
Replies: 26
Views: 4101

Re: verbed nouns [denominative/denominal verbs]

Thanks for the heads-up on the technical name for these critters.

You're welcome. I like to use those terms rather than the newer one to help dispel any invocation of the recency illusion. But, you've gotta love the sic quality of the modern term.
by zmjezhd
Fri Dec 31, 2010 3:48 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: A Wright Problem
Replies: 22
Views: 6329

Re: A Wright Problem

In Middle English ark also meant 'chest, coffer', so an arkwright was a maker of chests ( link ). This dual meaning goes all the way back through Latin ( arca ) and Greek (τιβη, τηβη) to the Hebrew of the Old testament. (The Latin and Greek/Hebrew words are not related.) Besides Noah's Ark, there is...
by zmjezhd
Fri Dec 31, 2010 12:24 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: verbed nouns [denominative/denominal verbs]
Replies: 26
Views: 4101

Re: verbed nouns

verbed nouns

Also known as denominative verbs or denominal verbs.
by zmjezhd
Tue Dec 14, 2010 3:03 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings Archive
Topic: bandwidth
Replies: 16
Views: 19431

Re: bandwidth

"The government has decided to invest heavily in nuclear". Not something I'd say or write, but I can see it. Nuclear in going nuclear is not an adverb as it does not modify/qualify the verb - go, here, is a link-like verb, where the main lexical content is carried by the adjective nuclear (cf bad i...
by zmjezhd
Mon Dec 13, 2010 6:22 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings Archive
Topic: bandwidth
Replies: 16
Views: 19431

Re: bandwidth

Bob, I have no problem with coal as a noun, a verb, or an adjective. I was just observing that the word was a noun going back to Old English. I was implying that I had never run across the word as originally an adjective that had been nominalized. Likewise, I cannot think of an example of nuclear as...
by zmjezhd
Mon Dec 13, 2010 4:27 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings Archive
Topic: bandwidth
Replies: 16
Views: 19431

Re: bandwidth

I've had to adjust to Conservative and nuclear being duplicated into the noun class - by analogy with Labour and coal, say, - to productively fill awkward gaps. It might be my prae-caffeine lack of bandwidth, but I am not familiar with nuclear as a noun or coal as an adjective. Coal has always been...
by zmjezhd
Sun Dec 05, 2010 3:12 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: For
Replies: 12
Views: 2076

Re: For

For in this sentence is a conjunction meaning 'because, since', and it is correctly used. This is a demonstrative pronoun, and I am not quite sure what it refers to. If it is the situation of answering the woman's questions but giving no further information, then it is incorrect, because he started...
by zmjezhd
Sat Nov 27, 2010 5:56 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Truck stop: bookstore?
Replies: 9
Views: 2828

Re: Truck stop: bookstore?

Jerry, from what you've posted so far from this book, I do not have much confidence in the Lewins' abilities as lexicographers. I mean, in a way, a truck stop and a bookstore are places where people (truckers and readers) hang out and interact with one another, but using bookstore as a synonym of tr...