Search found 4178 matches

by Bobinwales
Thu Jun 09, 2005 9:49 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: double superlatives
Replies: 14
Views: 3545

double superlatives

My belief is that it dates from a speech by Princess Anne about 10 or 12 years ago when with a magnificent slip of the tongue instead of saying what she intended, she actually said, “I am sure you know more better than I”. All participants in the fashion should be hung up by their ears until they le...
by Bobinwales
Thu Jun 09, 2005 9:39 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: tapping up
Replies: 7
Views: 1522

tapping up

Which just leaves us with Phil's last point:

- can the media really expect people to understand the term without explanation?

No they can't, but they do rely heavily on the emperor's new clothes syndrome? No one could possibly admit to not knowing what it means.
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 08, 2005 2:38 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: gimlet (eyes and vodka or gin)
Replies: 9
Views: 5249

gimlet (eyes and vodka or gin)

Sandy, where did you find the word "cwimlam"? I can find only four words in Welsh where an "i" follows a "w" (both are vowels), and cwimlam isn't one of them. I am a rotten Welsh speaker, but my dictionaries are very good.
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 08, 2005 2:17 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: ticked off at "ticked off"
Replies: 9
Views: 4142

ticked off at "ticked off"

This is strange, “ticked off” meaning admonished is a perfectly common expression here, and still in daily use. It really surprises me that only Sandy has heard of it, Scotland and Wales hardly share a border. On the subject of forms that we fill in and Americans fill out, have you noticed that Brit...
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 08, 2005 8:11 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Shew vs. show
Replies: 2
Views: 2424

Shew vs. show

I haven't seen it since I was a young, I mean younger man either, and as you say it was only used by older people then. Perhaps it has fallen into the great shredder.
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 08, 2005 8:07 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: gimlet (eyes and vodka or gin)
Replies: 9
Views: 5249

gimlet (eyes and vodka or gin)

And if I saw it I would drink it, always assuming I could chisel the money out of She Who Must Be Obeyed.
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 08, 2005 8:00 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: ticked off at "ticked off"
Replies: 9
Views: 4142

ticked off at "ticked off"

To tick someone off is to admonish them. "The child's mother ticked him off for running in the corridor". "I was ticked off when I got my sums wrong".
by Bobinwales
Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: tapping up
Replies: 7
Views: 1522

tapping up

I remember that we used to tap up girls in the Sixties (“I’m going to tap up that bird in the red mini dress”). It was used then, as apparently now, instead of “chat up”. But in truth, it is not an expression I have heard since those days, so I was quite surprised when it suddenly came into use agai...
by Bobinwales
Tue Jun 07, 2005 12:52 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Blair Arrives for Bush Talks
Replies: 7
Views: 2199

Blair Arrives for Bush Talks

Do you think that there is any hope that this one will spontaneously combust as well?
by Bobinwales
Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:24 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?
Replies: 14
Views: 4969

Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?

I have ordered more fingers for Christmas so that I can do my sums, there are times that you can only feel an idiot!
by Bobinwales
Sun Jun 05, 2005 9:45 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?
Replies: 14
Views: 4969

Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?

Oh that I could have another go at this game called life in 42 years time, there might even be a cure for the mobile telephone by then.

I meant twenty-one-forty-seven of course. I often wonder why I didn't go in for maths.
by Bobinwales
Sun Jun 05, 2005 4:46 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?
Replies: 14
Views: 4969

Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?

For what it is worth I use "twenty-oh-five" working on the principle that "two-thousand-one-hundred-and-forty-seven will be a bit of a mouthful for me when people ask me in what year I will be 100, twenty-forty-seven seems a lot easier.
by Bobinwales
Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:43 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: welsh/welch on a bet
Replies: 11
Views: 12710

welsh/welch on a bet

Do you mean OWAIN GLYNDWR Edwin? It was a bloke called Shakespeare who spelled him Owen Glendower, and he had trouble spelling his own name as I recall! Actually, we have a comedian here called Owen Money, which means that as a signature tune he can use “The best things in life are free. But you can...
by Bobinwales
Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:03 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Great Britain
Replies: 25
Views: 7641

Great Britain

I fully agree with Frank. The sentiment that Briton is not great any more does show ignorance, and he is also right that these people will not take telling. If I might paraphrase Frank, Brittany, which is now part of France is Lesser Britain, which makes the UK mainland, Great Britain. Just to empha...
by Bobinwales
Sat Jun 04, 2005 10:11 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: stand a chance
Replies: 9
Views: 3299

stand a chance

If Erik does tell us where his friend banks, I will be delighted to stand a round next year, as opposed to having to stand around next here.