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by Bobinwales
Mon Apr 04, 2005 4:34 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: pikey
Replies: 14
Views: 8895

pikey

One of my friends agrees with Julius, but it would seem that the term is particularly Kentish, and has not spread very far over the borders, it's a good word to learn, Thanks.
by Bobinwales
Mon Apr 04, 2005 4:32 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "Last straw"/Clochandichter
Replies: 39
Views: 11959

"Last straw"/Clochandichter

You may be interested to know that I once saw a bloke from Sardinia playing bagless pipes. He stuck a couple of what looked like sticks into his mouth, played tunes on a chanter and managed the drones with recirculatory breathing. It was quite something to see, and hear.
by Bobinwales
Mon Apr 04, 2005 4:24 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Folsom / Native American vs. Indian
Replies: 15
Views: 4064

Folsom / Native American vs. Indian

Hans Joerg has raised an interesting point in one sentence, "As for Native Americans - in August 2004 I attended the Pow-Wow of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians". I understand the PC term “Native Americans”, but on this side of the Pond it would appear that Columbus' mistake is...
by Bobinwales
Sun Apr 03, 2005 7:06 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Brussels sprouts
Replies: 7
Views: 1667

Brussels sprouts

Am I the only one who has never heard of the word “boorcole”? Broccoli I knew even before Cubby of that name and his version of James Bond.
by Bobinwales
Fri Apr 01, 2005 3:43 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: pikey
Replies: 14
Views: 8895

pikey

This is interesting in the extreme as I have never heard of its use apart from a character in “Dad’s Army” (a long running television comedy about the Home Guard during the last War) who could be a bit dim. I can say with certainty that the expression has never hit my part of Wales. I’ll check with ...
by Bobinwales
Wed Mar 30, 2005 8:26 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Scotch (the adjective) / Scotch tape
Replies: 3
Views: 5163

Scotch (the adjective) / Scotch tape

If you were in the UK it would be a Sellotape pine, which doesn’t have quite the same ring to it.

When I was a boy I was always told that apart from whisky, beef and eggs (a boiled egg wrapped in sausage meat and breadcrumbs before deep frying) the word Scotch should never be used.
by Bobinwales
Tue Mar 29, 2005 9:40 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: scotch (the verb)
Replies: 18
Views: 4405

scotch (the verb)

Erik, Now that you mention it, yes, it was a phrase I had completely forgotten about. I do remember "three ha'pence" meaning a penny and a half, or a penny h'penny. Fruit Salads were the same price as Blackjacks, so you could mix them up and get two of each. And, may the saints help me, I actually r...
by Bobinwales
Tue Mar 29, 2005 9:08 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: scarf (the eating one)
Replies: 2
Views: 3894

scarf (the eating one)

“He scoffed down his grub” is in everyday use, but apart from the thing you put around your neck the only other uses of scarf that I know are berthing one ship against another, or joining timber. I have never come across it as a variant of scoff. Is it common elsewhere?
by Bobinwales
Tue Mar 29, 2005 8:52 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: scotch (the verb)
Replies: 18
Views: 4405

scotch (the verb)

The use of scotch as a noun is also quite common, it being the wedge or whatever you use to scotch a wheel. I was a bit puzzled by the use of the word “halfpence” in The Parent's Assistant. The UK turned to decimal currency in 1971, and the last (old) half penny had been minted in 1967, up until its...
by Bobinwales
Thu Mar 24, 2005 2:19 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: untranslatables
Replies: 45
Views: 10258

untranslatables

Sort of Edwin, but there is more to it than that, I think you have to hear the usage. If I wanted to say to a child, "Don't go near that thing on the floor, it is dirty", "Ach-y-fe!" more than does the job. Also if Dai came home to his wife drunk, her neighbour would mutter "Ach-y-fe" to her friend ...
by Bobinwales
Thu Mar 24, 2005 10:02 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: spade / call a spade a spade
Replies: 4
Views: 6758

spade / call a spade a spade

I can happily confirm the use of shovel, but strangely enough, it is always seems to be in the third person. You would not use "Let's call a spade a shovel", but you would say, “He calls a spade a bloody shovel” if he was particularly blunt.
by Bobinwales
Thu Mar 24, 2005 9:39 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: untranslatables
Replies: 45
Views: 10258

untranslatables

To return to the original thread, there are several untranslatables in Welsh, my favourite being “Ach-y-fe”. It is pronounced with the accent on the “ach” (“a” as in lad, “ch” as in Bach the composer, or Scottish loch), and the “y-fe” (uh-vee) slurred. It is a mystery to me how anyone can possibly b...
by Bobinwales
Wed Mar 23, 2005 1:15 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: untranslatables
Replies: 45
Views: 10258

untranslatables

If we follow this thread, we will find that some people praise jewellery above all things, finding themselves accepting a laud of the rings.
by Bobinwales
Tue Mar 22, 2005 12:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Negro, colored, Black, African American, person of color
Replies: 16
Views: 11659

Negro, colored, Black, African American, person of color

I have a problem with pc terminology. I have very little hair on my head. I am bald; I am not folically-challenged. The term sounds daft and is daft. I drink my coffee black, not “without milk”, as some would have me say. The access to the sewer is through a manhole, I use the term “ladies and gentl...
by Bobinwales
Mon Mar 21, 2005 9:08 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: emigrant / immigrant
Replies: 4
Views: 1810

emigrant / immigrant

Albert Smith decides to leave Britain to live out his life in Australia. He does all that is necessary and is accepted, so Erik, living in the UK says goodbye to the emigrant. In Australia, WOZ is happy to meet the immigrant and buy him a beer. Does Ken in the USA describe Albert as an emigrant or a...