Search found 4130 matches

by Bobinwales
Mon May 23, 2005 8:05 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Stepbrother or Half-brother or both?
Replies: 3
Views: 2087

Stepbrother or Half-brother or both?

He is her HALF-BROTHER. A full brother would have both parents the same. A stepbrother would have no blood ties, being the son of her mother's husband (Your wife's stepfather’s son).
by Bobinwales
Sun May 22, 2005 1:31 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: down to
Replies: 6
Views: 1784

down to

I have a horrible feeling that we are trying to find an explanation for something that is no more than an expression. It has slipped into the language via usage, but was probably started by a bloke in a pub saying it when he couldn't think of the proper word, and then copied by the chap he was talki...
by Bobinwales
Fri May 20, 2005 3:29 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: down to
Replies: 6
Views: 1784

down to

Nicholas, As far as I am aware this is pure slang, “Are you drunk? I’ll put that down to you drinking three bottles of wine”. We'll see if the English division agree.
by Bobinwales
Fri May 20, 2005 10:47 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Afrocentric and Eurocentric
Replies: 16
Views: 8200

Afrocentric and Eurocentric

I have not been able to find any references to AFROCENTRICITY prior to Dr Asante (who seems to claim that he coined the word) in 1980, and after that his book of that name in 1988. But I admit that I have only spent a couple of lunch hours on it.
by Bobinwales
Fri May 20, 2005 10:38 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: cheeping vs chirping
Replies: 6
Views: 2054

cheeping vs chirping

Somewhere in the middle of quack, gobble, and cock-a-doddle-do I would think.
by Bobinwales
Tue May 17, 2005 4:18 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: punching dogies / cowpunching
Replies: 5
Views: 7428

punching dogies / cowpunching

I'm no expert in American English, but I always took it as driving cattle. I understand that a cow puncher is also a cow poke. As one can poke someone in the eye with a punch it always seemed a strange pairing of words to me as I sat watching Roy Rogers sing his way out of trouble.
by Bobinwales
Tue May 17, 2005 12:46 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: bailiwick
Replies: 13
Views: 3064

bailiwick

Isn't there a Brunswick in Maine?

Bob in Wales
(also Berwick and Sedgwick)
by Bobinwales
Tue May 17, 2005 12:40 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: cheeping vs chirping
Replies: 6
Views: 2054

cheeping vs chirping

If a bird cheeps, it’s chirping. Either is onomatopoeic.
by Bobinwales
Tue May 17, 2005 9:56 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: The meaning of the word "Abu" and "areba"
Replies: 16
Views: 3870

The meaning of the word "Abu" and "areba"

I don’t have a Bible with me to check my memory, but as I recall the first experience of “speaking in tongues” was at Pentecost, when the Disciples started preaching, and everyone present heard them speak in their own language. This seems to have been turned around into someone shouting gobbledegook...
by Bobinwales
Mon May 16, 2005 11:29 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: toward/towards
Replies: 21
Views: 8285

toward/towards

I would not say that “British uses the ‘s’ and American does not”, and I am not sure that I agree about not actually reaching the opera house either. Yes in your example, you do not reach it, but you would not with “Head towards the opera house and turn left when you reach the town hall” either. Tha...
by Bobinwales
Mon May 16, 2005 7:43 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: outstanding
Replies: 10
Views: 2164

outstanding

Welsh dungarees were only visible on pregnant ladies in the '70's. They have now, thankfully, gone the way of flares and platform soles.
by Bobinwales
Sun May 15, 2005 10:00 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: kindly requested to kindly...
Replies: 11
Views: 6494

kindly requested to kindly...

If you don't answer our previous letter, we will get Bush to telephone you.
by Bobinwales
Fri May 13, 2005 8:37 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: BOSS & BIGHEAD
Replies: 6
Views: 2176

BOSS & BIGHEAD

Right, many thanks, you seem to have BOSS sorted, and I, and my protégée, are very grateful indeed. However, this BIGHEAD business now has me extremely interested. The expression, meaning “a person with too much ego” is in every day use in the UK. But there is quite literally nothing else in the exe...
by Bobinwales
Thu May 12, 2005 4:03 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: How do you pronounce 'Confirm'?
Replies: 6
Views: 4702

How do you pronounce 'Confirm'?

CONFIRM looks like a phonetic spelling to me, although Phil may just have something with his Northern Ireland question, but wouldn't that be CON FURIM? Any Irish people out there reading this?
by Bobinwales
Thu May 12, 2005 10:29 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: BOSS & BIGHEAD
Replies: 6
Views: 2176

BOSS & BIGHEAD

Can you please help me with my homework? OK, I left school in 1964, but I got lumbered with helping a young girl with her's. The object was to spot words in a paragraph that had been originally used in America, and had now been absorbed into UK English. Seven of the nine were easy, and by a process ...