Search found 4178 matches

by Bobinwales
Mon Jul 04, 2005 1:20 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "it was a fluke"
Replies: 15
Views: 5632

"it was a fluke"

I should have explained more clearly. What I meant was that I can accept that the word came from the fish, but I am still convinced that the expression came from billiards. I am not a fisherman, I have not eaten a fluke, and as far as I know have never seen one. I reiterate that it is not a popular ...
by Bobinwales
Mon Jul 04, 2005 10:24 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Adultery
Replies: 4
Views: 1516

Adultery

Thank you all. I think we can safely keep the worshiping of idols out of the equation. In its most simple form, the argument was "can an unmarried person be an adulterer?" I said "Yes", Shelly says "Yes" and Ken says "Yes"; unfortunately, all of the definitions I have seen of the word are a bit wool...
by Bobinwales
Mon Jul 04, 2005 8:22 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "it was a fluke"
Replies: 15
Views: 5632

"it was a fluke"

The arguments have convinced me that the expression came from the fish, but I remain adamant that it came from billiards, even though I agree that latterly it is sometimes used to describe a chance accident good or bad
by Bobinwales
Sun Jul 03, 2005 7:56 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: menstruate
Replies: 7
Views: 2216

menstruate

The curse. Although in truth I wouldn't mind betting that it was probably never mentioned.
by Bobinwales
Sun Jul 03, 2005 7:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Adultery
Replies: 4
Views: 1516

Adultery

This question is to settle an argument. If a married woman sleeps with a man that is not her husband, she commits adultery. But, if the man is single is he an adulterer or a fornicator? I am convinced from a long ago implanted memory that even if only one of the pair is married, both commit adultery...
by Bobinwales
Sat Jul 02, 2005 2:31 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: brass meaning nerve or rudeness
Replies: 1
Views: 1138

brass meaning nerve or rudeness

My guess is that it comes from the expression "brass neck", which means arrogance, someone who will not be moved from a course of action. Simply put, someone who cannot turn his head.

Brassed off is a real expression, and quite common, it means fed up.
by Bobinwales
Sat Jul 02, 2005 2:20 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Sandles
Replies: 2
Views: 1080

Sandles

Sandals feminine masculine. Might I suggest that your spellchecker is a little under used Jay?
by Bobinwales
Thu Jun 30, 2005 4:13 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "it was a fluke"
Replies: 15
Views: 5632

"it was a fluke"

I don't think I can agree with your connection to the fish, Ken. It isn't a popular dish, and I can't see for the life of me why a dead fish can be considered lucky. It's a bit like people who carry a rabbit's foot as a lucky charm. I have always thought that it didn't bring a lot of luck to the rab...
by Bobinwales
Thu Jun 30, 2005 8:58 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "it was a fluke"
Replies: 15
Views: 5632

"it was a fluke"

I would say from billiards or snooker, where it means points scored for which the player did not aim. A lucky shot. I don't know whether it arrived fully formed from a dialect or something though. Snooker itself was developed in India, so it could possibly come from there.
by Bobinwales
Sun Jun 26, 2005 8:32 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: see you
Replies: 18
Views: 5320

see you

Frank, A bit pedantic aren't we? Or should a blind man not say "See you soon", or should we not start a letter "It's good to hear from you" when someone has written to you? They are all manners of speech, and should not be considered as being even remotely literal.
by Bobinwales
Sun Jun 26, 2005 10:46 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Do we 'make' or 'take' a decision?
Replies: 47
Views: 12416

Do we 'make' or 'take' a decision?

I have been running this through my mind since it was first posted. I am pretty sure that I have never taken a decision in my life, but I have made thousands. The friends with whom I have mentioned it seem to think the same, so I wonder if it is a translators' thing. I don't know.
by Bobinwales
Fri Jun 24, 2005 12:57 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: off your rocker
Replies: 9
Views: 12333

off your rocker

Rocker - implying old age/selinity - must be the Rolling Stones.
by Bobinwales
Fri Jun 24, 2005 8:10 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: untranslatables
Replies: 45
Views: 10975

untranslatables

That is indeed interesting Ahmed, and there must be some reason for there being such similar expressions for similar use arising so far from each other. Unless of course the Welsh really are the lost tribe of Israel as some legends would have it, in which case it could be folk memory!
by Bobinwales
Thu Jun 23, 2005 7:48 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Here's mud in your eye!
Replies: 22
Views: 30871

Here's mud in your eye!

Ken, "English soldiers", I think "British" would be a better word, my grandfather was there for one.
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 22, 2005 4:05 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: estoppel
Replies: 3
Views: 1244

estoppel

Thanks Ken, and welcome back. I hope the trip was enjoyable. What a disappointment, "the term does not appear to originate in any known language". It's a swizz!