Search found 4236 matches

by Bobinwales
Thu Aug 25, 2005 2:42 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Peas
Replies: 5
Views: 4913

Peas

Thanks Russ, from what you write I think they are the ones we call green or garden peas. I didn't know goober peas were peanuts either. I had heard the word, but had no idea of what they were, I just assumed they were a chick pea or something.
by Bobinwales
Wed Aug 24, 2005 8:04 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Peas
Replies: 5
Views: 4913

Peas

I am just re-reading “Silence of the Lambs”, and met a reference to “English peas”. I do know about English muffins that have nothing to do with England, and French fries that have nothing to do with France, but what makes a pea English? A stiff upper pod perhaps?
by Bobinwales
Tue Aug 16, 2005 4:26 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: diaper
Replies: 17
Views: 3616

diaper

They are over here, but then I have some pictures of the work of New York pavement artists, should they be sidewalk artists? And in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, they have British actors calling a Wonka Bar 'candy', when it is obviously a 'bar of chocolate'. Will we ever, did we ever, speak...
by Bobinwales
Tue Aug 16, 2005 3:16 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: diaper
Replies: 17
Views: 3616

diaper

OK Russ you have a valid point, and I have to admit that I am a bit pedantic about it, but after a lifetime of correcting people who ask "What part of England do you come from?" and correcting people who do think that England is Britain it all gets to be a bit automatic. You are correct, Russ, I apo...
by Bobinwales
Tue Aug 16, 2005 10:56 am
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Buffalo
Replies: 0
Views: 1631

Buffalo

UK English version:
What do you call a buffalo with five fingers and taps?
A hand bison.


US English version:
What do you call a buffalo with five fingers and faucets?
A hand bison.


Frankly, I’m not sure that it deserves one version, let alone two!
by Bobinwales
Tue Aug 16, 2005 8:31 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: diaper
Replies: 17
Views: 3616

diaper

Ellen, it is my self-imposed duty to get the whole world to realise that "England", and "Britain" are not synonyms. “Nappy” is a word used in England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Therefore it is a word used in Britain, not England. Please don’t be offended, I have had to put a lot people onto the r...
by Bobinwales
Tue Aug 16, 2005 8:20 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Great Britain
Replies: 25
Views: 8706

Great Britain

One test won, one test lost, one test drawn. Everyone is all fired up for the next one.
by Bobinwales
Tue Aug 16, 2005 8:18 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: curse words
Replies: 18
Views: 10986

curse words

I would forget about where you read it. The word is very old, Middle English at least "Schitten?" Ken? But if you have a quick look in the search facilities on the home page I am sure you will get the full story.
by Bobinwales
Tue Aug 16, 2005 8:09 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: puny
Replies: 11
Views: 5954

puny

It's not used in that context around this neck of the woods Tex.
by Bobinwales
Tue Aug 16, 2005 8:06 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: skiffle
Replies: 19
Views: 9930

skiffle

I know what I wrote Shelly. I am a terrible show off, I do a five minute set when the fridge light goes on. So if someone said to me one day, "I need a teachest bass for this track..."
by Bobinwales
Mon Aug 15, 2005 2:11 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: two times
Replies: 11
Views: 3746

two times

My guess is because "two-timing" is an American expression, and we have already discovered that Americans haven't got a twice.
@ @
0
\_/
by Bobinwales
Mon Aug 15, 2005 2:08 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: skiffle
Replies: 19
Views: 9930

skiffle

I had forgotten about the lagerphone, thanks for bringing that little joy back to front of my mind. Isn't it a shame that Rolf Harris didn't invent the wobbleboard until much later? Your description of how to play a teachest bass is quite correct Phil, we did try to get within two semi-tones, but it...
by Bobinwales
Sun Aug 14, 2005 11:43 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: diaper
Replies: 17
Views: 3616

diaper

Ouch. There's no need to shout Ellen.

@ @
0
\_/
by Bobinwales
Fri Aug 12, 2005 7:19 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: skiffle
Replies: 19
Views: 9930

skiffle

Also known as "The great skiffle disaster" it was a strange era. It started in the ‘50’s, and in it’s very basic form was American folk songs sung very loud and very fast. “Rock Island Line”, Tom Dooley”, “Battle of New Orleans” etc. It was played mainly on acoustic guitars and an assortment of more...
by Bobinwales
Thu Aug 11, 2005 8:04 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Language engineering
Replies: 16
Views: 5905

Language engineering

Thanks Erik, I can follow your reasoning now, but as you said, I am Welsh. I would be Welsh if my skin colour were green, so how can someone be African-American if their forebears were torn away from the continent in the 18th century? My great grandfather came from Somerset, that does not make me En...