Search found 4081 matches

by Bobinwales
Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:01 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: tapping up
Replies: 7
Views: 1412

tapping up

I remember that we used to tap up girls in the Sixties (“I’m going to tap up that bird in the red mini dress”). It was used then, as apparently now, instead of “chat up”. But in truth, it is not an expression I have heard since those days, so I was quite surprised when it suddenly came into use agai...
by Bobinwales
Tue Jun 07, 2005 12:52 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Blair Arrives for Bush Talks
Replies: 7
Views: 2012

Blair Arrives for Bush Talks

Do you think that there is any hope that this one will spontaneously combust as well?
by Bobinwales
Tue Jun 07, 2005 8:24 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?
Replies: 14
Views: 4407

Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?

I have ordered more fingers for Christmas so that I can do my sums, there are times that you can only feel an idiot!
by Bobinwales
Sun Jun 05, 2005 9:45 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?
Replies: 14
Views: 4407

Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?

Oh that I could have another go at this game called life in 42 years time, there might even be a cure for the mobile telephone by then.

I meant twenty-one-forty-seven of course. I often wonder why I didn't go in for maths.
by Bobinwales
Sun Jun 05, 2005 4:46 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?
Replies: 14
Views: 4407

Do the 'Naughties' come after the 90s?

For what it is worth I use "twenty-oh-five" working on the principle that "two-thousand-one-hundred-and-forty-seven will be a bit of a mouthful for me when people ask me in what year I will be 100, twenty-forty-seven seems a lot easier.
by Bobinwales
Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:43 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: welsh/welch on a bet
Replies: 11
Views: 12023

welsh/welch on a bet

Do you mean OWAIN GLYNDWR Edwin? It was a bloke called Shakespeare who spelled him Owen Glendower, and he had trouble spelling his own name as I recall! Actually, we have a comedian here called Owen Money, which means that as a signature tune he can use “The best things in life are free. But you can...
by Bobinwales
Sat Jun 04, 2005 8:03 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Great Britain
Replies: 25
Views: 6438

Great Britain

I fully agree with Frank. The sentiment that Briton is not great any more does show ignorance, and he is also right that these people will not take telling. If I might paraphrase Frank, Brittany, which is now part of France is Lesser Britain, which makes the UK mainland, Great Britain. Just to empha...
by Bobinwales
Sat Jun 04, 2005 10:11 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: stand a chance
Replies: 9
Views: 3066

stand a chance

If Erik does tell us where his friend banks, I will be delighted to stand a round next year, as opposed to having to stand around next here.
by Bobinwales
Fri Jun 03, 2005 1:59 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: 'In back of' vs.' behind'
Replies: 13
Views: 4661

'In back of' vs.' behind'

I wouldn't have though so Jane, we use "behind" in exactly the same ways in the UK, but we do not use "in back of" at all.
by Bobinwales
Fri Jun 03, 2005 7:42 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: stand a chance
Replies: 9
Views: 3066

stand a chance

Do you think it could have come from duelling parlance? "I stand to regain my good name".
by Bobinwales
Fri Jun 03, 2005 7:36 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: welsh/welch on a bet
Replies: 11
Views: 12023

welsh/welch on a bet

Allan is right, "rarebit" is the commonly used name, but Welsh rabbit is the dish. I have no idea how the name changed, possibly it was simply to avoid confusion on a menu.
by Bobinwales
Thu Jun 02, 2005 8:32 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: welsh/welch on a bet
Replies: 11
Views: 12023

welsh/welch on a bet

Ken, you will never know how pleased I am that we agree on the origin. I was not aware of the use of welsh to mean a language, although it is widely known here that “Welsh” does mean “foreigner” in one or more of the early Anglo Saxon languages. To the extent that some people now refuse to use it, p...
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 01, 2005 4:32 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.
Replies: 23
Views: 30163

skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

I have spent half an hour during my lunchtime having a look around here and there, well it beats sandwiches. I have a feeling that Skinnymalinks is going to turn out to be a character in a skipping song.
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 01, 2005 8:36 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: welsh/welch on a bet
Replies: 11
Views: 12023

welsh/welch on a bet

Strangely enough, most of my ancestors are Welsh as well! I have absolutely no written proof of this explanation of the term “To welsh on a bet”, but it certainly gets my vote. English bookmakers to avoid paying out on large bets sometimes ran over the border into Wales, and consequently were said t...
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 01, 2005 7:44 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: THE
Replies: 26
Views: 5722

THE

Erik, you know me so well.