Search found 3960 matches

by Bobinwales
Thu Mar 17, 2005 9:04 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: beer or beers
Replies: 23
Views: 5176

beer or beers

Long ago I worked with someone who used to say, "There is no such thing as bad beer. It's just that some is better than others". It's probably as well that the great landlord called "Time!" for him, he would be very upset to have to change his pet maxim, because sadly, Edwin is right.
by Bobinwales
Wed Mar 16, 2005 1:00 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: custom-made
Replies: 1
Views: 978

custom-made

The expression “custom-made” is being used in the UK now, but how did a word meaning “usual practice” come to mean, “made to order”?
by Bobinwales
Tue Mar 15, 2005 5:11 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: repertory
Replies: 4
Views: 3037

repertory

Long ago, when I was a theatre reviewer the words repertory and repertoire were not interchangeable, although there is clearly overlap in their definitions. A repertoire was the stock of material that an artist or company was able (or prepared) to perform. A company that staged a different play each...
by Bobinwales
Tue Mar 15, 2005 4:11 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: pair
Replies: 8
Views: 1343

pair

Nimo, My maxim "If it feels wrong, it probably is" takes effect here. You simply don't talk about bombings as though they were socks, therefore it feels wrong. In fact if it didn't you would not have raised the question in the first place. So I would maintain that although there may be no valid reas...
by Bobinwales
Tue Mar 15, 2005 9:24 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: wire-to-wire win
Replies: 3
Views: 3853

wire-to-wire win

I have never come across the expression “wire-to-wire”, but “down to the wire” meaning the matter is not decided until the very end is quite common.
by Bobinwales
Sat Mar 12, 2005 11:49 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Tetbury man to wed
Replies: 5
Views: 2287

Tetbury man to wed

Ah, but it's warm in Wales, if a little wet, and we know where to hide.
by Bobinwales
Fri Mar 11, 2005 12:59 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: rectitude on TV
Replies: 9
Views: 2307

rectitude on TV

Dale, I have to say that all of this strikes me as creating jargon for the sake of creating jargon. What is wrong in saying “The Dale Hileman Show is scheduled every Monday and Wednesday with repeats on Friday”? It says what it means without trying to work out whether “horizontal” is actually “verti...
by Bobinwales
Thu Mar 10, 2005 12:52 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: beer or beers
Replies: 23
Views: 5176

beer or beers

You mean we could download beer?

It mould make for some very strange pubs, and would give another meaning entirely to the term floppy drive.
by Bobinwales
Wed Mar 09, 2005 3:13 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: squeegee
Replies: 12
Views: 3160

squeegee

I know that "squeege" is an obsolete word, meaning squeeze, so what is the betting that squeegee is an obsolete brand name?

Incidentally, could "squeege" possibly have been written in ogham originally? A reversal of the Scottish Mengies being spelled Menzies sort of thing?
by Bobinwales
Tue Mar 08, 2005 9:10 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: beer or beers
Replies: 23
Views: 5176

beer or beers

Sorry Wiz, I see Australian names on the taps on British bars (I'm not naive enough to think that the stuff that comes out of them bears any resemblance to the beer you get) and never having been down there myself I thought that bottom fermented lagers were the norm. I am delighted to hear that brew...
by Bobinwales
Mon Mar 07, 2005 8:55 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: beer or beers
Replies: 23
Views: 5176

beer or beers

Would going Dutch start a different thread?

But then it would be well worth it to try Cwrw Cymru (Welsh beer)
by Bobinwales
Mon Mar 07, 2005 3:39 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: beer or beers
Replies: 23
Views: 5176

beer or beers

Now we really are talking about a subject near to my heart. The odd drop of the stuff has been known to pass my lips. Without going into too much detail, we in the UK brew a beer that ferments on the surface at a warmer temperature, and ages for quite a short time. The beer tends to be less carbonat...
by Bobinwales
Sun Mar 06, 2005 8:17 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: tool (the person)
Replies: 2
Views: 1070

tool (the person)

I await erudite theories by others more learned, but I will point out that “tool” is yet one more euphemism for penis, and as far as I know no-one called by any one of those myriad terms is ever being called clever.
by Bobinwales
Fri Mar 04, 2005 9:14 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: baby blues
Replies: 11
Views: 2052

baby blues

Could it be that colours are used to describe emotions generally in English? Green with envy, seeing red, black mood, etc. I was surprised that the expressions, blue and blues, are so old, and came from the UK in the first place. Nowadays it might be said that someone was feeling a bit blue, but bey...
by Bobinwales
Thu Mar 03, 2005 10:28 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: baby blues
Replies: 11
Views: 2052

baby blues

I would not use the phrase for family and friends. I could possibly say that a neighbour has the baby blues, but if I am speaking of someone close, I would be more likely to use the more formal “post natal depression”. “Baby blues” just does not sound like an illness somehow; in fact, “blues” is har...