Search found 4020 matches

by Bobinwales
Fri Apr 29, 2005 8:27 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Heavens no vs Hell no
Replies: 7
Views: 3448

Heavens no vs Hell no

I blame John Wayne.
by Bobinwales
Thu Apr 28, 2005 8:32 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Hollick
Replies: 5
Views: 1202

Hollick

I thought he altered the spelling of his name by changing the H to a B, the i to an o and adding an s.
by Bobinwales
Thu Apr 28, 2005 8:22 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: dicker
Replies: 8
Views: 2579

dicker

Dickering is not wildly used in the UK, I know what it means, but I don’t recall ever having used the word. Bickering however is a different matter. In the example you have used from Reuters Ken, I get the mental picture of a bunch of politicians quarrelling in the same way that brothers and sisters...
by Bobinwales
Tue Apr 26, 2005 3:54 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: pattern of intelligence
Replies: 5
Views: 1160

pattern of intelligence

I'm glad you didn't suggest that Blair's pattern is to find evidence to prove an erroneous conclusion, Erik, I wouldn't dream of doing so either. I wonder how many other people will find ways not to say such things before 05.05.05.
by Bobinwales
Tue Apr 26, 2005 8:42 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: New ROOTs?
Replies: 20
Views: 3364

New ROOTs?

Supercalifragalisticexpialidocious.
by Bobinwales
Mon Apr 25, 2005 6:05 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: origin of cordial?
Replies: 8
Views: 1909

origin of cordial?

I have been away for a few days and am only now able to catch up.

Wiz, I am realiably informed that Sir C has booked a block of three seats together on the plane for Jonny's stretcher.

Apologies to anyone who doesnt have a clue what we are talking about.
by Bobinwales
Thu Apr 21, 2005 9:27 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: stationary / stationery
Replies: 2
Views: 1604

stationary / stationery

Reminds me of the bloke who went into a shop and asked the young female assistant "Do you keep stationery?" She replied, "Most of the time, but when we get near the end I go absolutely beserk".
by Bobinwales
Wed Apr 20, 2005 8:14 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: origin of cordial?
Replies: 8
Views: 1909

origin of cordial?

Wiz, although I cordially wish you well, I cannot encourage your desire to see a Lions demolition. However, as they have seen fit to take only 10 Welshmen, I must say that the All Blacks are in with a chance to run them close, or even force a draw.
by Bobinwales
Tue Apr 19, 2005 3:17 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: origin of cordial?
Replies: 8
Views: 1909

origin of cordial?

When I was a child in the Fifties here in Wales, we always called it cordial as well, but having said that I don’t think that I have heard the word in that context for years. I am not aware of it being used for alcoholic drinks over here, but I do believe that it is not uncommon in the USA. However,...
by Bobinwales
Tue Apr 19, 2005 9:30 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: fayre (fair)
Replies: 7
Views: 1864

fayre (fair)

Be fayre it's a reasonable mistake! But there is still no mention of game, and after all that I'm reluctant to pass an opinion that it never was!
by Bobinwales
Tue Apr 19, 2005 7:44 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: fayre (fair)
Replies: 7
Views: 1864

fayre (fair)

I knew this would happen!

I actually checked with OED before posting and it came up with "noun pseudo-archaic spelling of FAIR2", and it seemed to agree with my, obviously erroneous, belief.
by Bobinwales
Mon Apr 18, 2005 11:05 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: fayre (fair)
Replies: 7
Views: 1864

fayre (fair)

Actually David, it is one of those invented pieces of nonsense to make things seem quaint, such as “Ye Olde Tea Shoppe”. A fair has always been a fair as far as I am aware. Although now that I have said that, I have no doubt that Ken will find some reference to fayre in his library.
by Bobinwales
Mon Apr 18, 2005 8:37 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: amateur
Replies: 3
Views: 1856

amateur

Jenni, perhaps the hill is flattening out. The word is still widely used in sport, and means simply that a person does not make a living in this fashion. I agree that at one time it would have meant, “receives no payment”, but times change. Carry on spreading the word (sorry, awful pun).
by Bobinwales
Sat Apr 16, 2005 4:06 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: flaunt vs. flout
Replies: 12
Views: 3651

flaunt vs. flout

Can we have a quick check with the Brits in the Forum?

I'm not at all sure that there is any confusion in UK English, one flouts the law and flaunts wealth.
by Bobinwales
Fri Apr 15, 2005 7:46 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: pocketbook / purse / handbag
Replies: 10
Views: 3062

pocketbook / purse / handbag

Right, between Erik and Russ I know what shoes we are talking about, but no-one I have spoken to remembers what they called them. I can remember "dolly shoes", which were the same style with a button on the side that looked like a dolls eye, but we all recall a buckled variety, and one with a T Bar,...