Search found 4057 matches

by Bobinwales
Fri Jun 03, 2005 7:42 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: stand a chance
Replies: 9
Views: 3048

stand a chance

Do you think it could have come from duelling parlance? "I stand to regain my good name".
by Bobinwales
Fri Jun 03, 2005 7:36 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: welsh/welch on a bet
Replies: 11
Views: 11978

welsh/welch on a bet

Allan is right, "rarebit" is the commonly used name, but Welsh rabbit is the dish. I have no idea how the name changed, possibly it was simply to avoid confusion on a menu.
by Bobinwales
Thu Jun 02, 2005 8:32 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: welsh/welch on a bet
Replies: 11
Views: 11978

welsh/welch on a bet

Ken, you will never know how pleased I am that we agree on the origin. I was not aware of the use of welsh to mean a language, although it is widely known here that “Welsh” does mean “foreigner” in one or more of the early Anglo Saxon languages. To the extent that some people now refuse to use it, p...
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 01, 2005 4:32 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.
Replies: 23
Views: 30010

skinnymalink(s) / skinny malink(s) / skinny marink(s) / etc.

I have spent half an hour during my lunchtime having a look around here and there, well it beats sandwiches. I have a feeling that Skinnymalinks is going to turn out to be a character in a skipping song.
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 01, 2005 8:36 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: welsh/welch on a bet
Replies: 11
Views: 11978

welsh/welch on a bet

Strangely enough, most of my ancestors are Welsh as well! I have absolutely no written proof of this explanation of the term “To welsh on a bet”, but it certainly gets my vote. English bookmakers to avoid paying out on large bets sometimes ran over the border into Wales, and consequently were said t...
by Bobinwales
Wed Jun 01, 2005 7:44 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: THE
Replies: 26
Views: 5654

THE

Erik, you know me so well.
by Bobinwales
Tue May 31, 2005 3:51 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: THE
Replies: 26
Views: 5654

THE

As you probably know most pubs in the UK are THE Something or other, The Black Lion, The Jolly Blacksmith, The Joiners' Arms, The Coach and Horses etc. I once took over a job in which there were separate files for 85% of the pubs of a large city, every one filed under "T" for "The".
by Bobinwales
Mon May 30, 2005 11:14 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: slick mile
Replies: 8
Views: 1601

slick mile

Just for information, and I have only a passing interest (ouch, bad pun) in Formula One Motor Racing, but they banned slick tyres a couple of years ago, and all are now grooved.
by Bobinwales
Sun May 29, 2005 6:40 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: free-range hater
Replies: 6
Views: 1223

free-range hater

Dale, I realise that this is not the answer to the question you have posed, but apart from the farming sense, or "giving free range" (no hyphen) I have never heard of the expression. Free-range haters? Total mystery.
by Bobinwales
Sat May 28, 2005 9:54 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: denim and corduroy
Replies: 21
Views: 3954

denim and corduroy

No Erik, Aberflyhalf is a pretty village on top of a mountain near Cardiff. It consists of a chapel, pub and rugby club. No one knows what the women do with their time, but as Wales is ruled by them it must be something important, because they send their men off to play rugby as soon as they come ho...
by Bobinwales
Fri May 27, 2005 9:09 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: skinny (as in 'the skinny')
Replies: 12
Views: 17707

skinny (as in 'the skinny')

Nah, Someone who is skinny is painfully thin. More meat on a butcher's pencil and all that. Actually, since I wrote that I remembered that my mother, and we are going back nearly 50 years here, used to call an exceptionally thin person "Skinny Malinks", I am guessing the spelling of Malinks, it coul...
by Bobinwales
Thu May 26, 2005 10:12 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: Afrocentric and Eurocentric
Replies: 16
Views: 8012

Afrocentric and Eurocentric

We had never heard of pizza in the part of Wales I lived in back in the 50's, so the lyrics I heard were totally mystifying as he seemed to be seeing the Moon as a big bit of pie.
by Bobinwales
Wed May 25, 2005 11:20 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: King James and UK vs US English
Replies: 6
Views: 2382

King James and UK vs US English

Give us chapter and verse Bill, I'm not going to be able to read the whole book before I answer.

I am at work at the moment, but will check this evening if you can give me a few examples.
by Bobinwales
Tue May 24, 2005 4:39 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: hunky-dory
Replies: 4
Views: 2295

hunky-dory

That's an interesting use of PUTTER Dale, I thought it might have been a typing error until I checked. We POTTER in the garden, the only use we would have for a putter is to finally clip a golf ball into the hole after chasing it all over the course.
by Bobinwales
Tue May 24, 2005 8:19 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: spring tide
Replies: 4
Views: 1683

spring tide

Ken, It strikes me that if you are all in the same boat it would be well to know whether a spring tide was due.

By the way you didn't mention a NEAP TIDE, which is exceptionally low, when the Moon and Sun are in no sort of alignment at all.