Search found 3919 matches

by Bobinwales
Mon Feb 21, 2005 8:43 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: reversing quotes
Replies: 11
Views: 2959

reversing quotes

My thanks for putting me in the right direction by at least having the right terminology.
by Bobinwales
Sun Feb 20, 2005 10:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Ay, there's the rub
Replies: 6
Views: 3903

Ay, there's the rub

Thanks for the tip Phil, I appreciate your advice. "The rub of the green" meaning good luck throughout a game is still widely used. I had assumed that it had come from bowls, but not that long ago. Just a thought though, surely bowls at that time would be a game similar to boules (pétanque) which in...
by Bobinwales
Sun Feb 20, 2005 3:47 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Ay, there's the rub
Replies: 6
Views: 3903

Ay, there's the rub

I had this from the Online Etymological Dictionary rub (v.) 1377, perhaps related to E.Fris. rubben "to scratch, rub," and Low Ger. rubbeling "rough, uneven," or similar words in Scandinavian (cf. Dan. rubbe "to rub, scrub," Norw. rubba), of uncertain origin. Hamlet's there's the rub (1602) preserve...
by Bobinwales
Thu Feb 17, 2005 9:13 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: I'll be there with bells on
Replies: 7
Views: 3940

I'll be there with bells on

Just a theory, but Morris dancers who invariably dance with bells on their ankles do not usually wear them to and from the place they are to dance.

A dancer with bells on would be fully dressed and ready to go.
by Bobinwales
Wed Feb 16, 2005 9:13 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: testimony, testicles
Replies: 8
Views: 2469

testimony, testicles

I have actually heard about an oath being sworn on the swearer’s own testicles. It was somewhere in the Mediterranean, Crete?

I would have thought you would feel a bit of a prick though.
by Bobinwales
Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:15 am
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: number agreement, synesis, and the singular ‘their’
Replies: 20
Views: 6904

number agreement, synesis, and the singular ‘their’

Good grief Louis, I think you just managed an argument against yourself. Your last posting was gibberish to anyone who had not been following the thread, and bloody difficult for those of us who have.
by Bobinwales
Tue Feb 15, 2005 9:08 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: capiche / capisce / capeesh / capish / coppish
Replies: 14
Views: 33298

capiche / capisce / capeesh / capish / coppish

I thought that you might like to know that coppish, (kop-pysh) is a word I have not seen or heard since childhood. We have an extra language in Wales called Wenglish, which was once described as speaking English through the medium of Welsh. Usually it is a use of Welsh grammar in English sentences e...
by Bobinwales
Mon Feb 14, 2005 10:24 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: And, as they say, Annie's home
Replies: 10
Views: 1591

And, as they say, Annie's home

I broached the subject of Annie with my Moiety (I may as well use the word now that I have found it), who was brought up in the West Riding of Yorkshire, afterwards living in the East Riding as well as in various places of England further south before settling in Wales. I am afraid that she has neve...
by Bobinwales
Mon Feb 14, 2005 9:16 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: And, as they say, Annie's home
Replies: 10
Views: 1591

And, as they say, Annie's home

This is not an expression that I have ever heard in Wales, but I will ask around my English friends out of pure curiosity. I do know ‘Bob’s your uncle’ of course. When your name is Bob, you tend to notice these things when explaining to small children that you are not THE Bob, and that you are not t...
by Bobinwales
Sun Feb 13, 2005 9:38 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: leave it all out on the field
Replies: 4
Views: 1283

leave it all out on the field

I have never heard this expression. Is it used extensively ouside the UK, or ever used inside for that matter?
by Bobinwales
Fri Feb 11, 2005 9:38 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Tetbury man to wed
Replies: 5
Views: 2241

Tetbury man to wed

Isn’t it interesting that the Prince of Wales, the Duke of Cornwall, Duke of Rothesay, Earl of Carrick, Lord of Renfrew, Lord of the Isles, Prince and Great Steward of Scotland and Earl of Chester, actually lives in Tetbury? For the record I am heartily sick of his impending nuptials already. All I ...
by Bobinwales
Tue Feb 08, 2005 4:55 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: mnemonics
Replies: 16
Views: 6505

mnemonics

I used to teach guitar, and came up with EveryBody Goes Digging An Elephant for the names of the strings. I was then asked about the standard ukulele tuning which is A D F# B. All I ever managed was All Dogs F#ck Bitches.
by Bobinwales
Tue Feb 08, 2005 1:26 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: I should coco(a)!
Replies: 3
Views: 1326

I should coco(a)!

Dear me Mel, Bertram Mills, and Billy Smart toured England did they? Well although I don’t remember the ‘40s, I was a babe in arms then, I do distinctly remember them pitching their big tops on Swansea Recreation Ground in the ‘50s, so they must have toured Wales as well. And probably Scotland. Did ...
by Bobinwales
Tue Feb 08, 2005 1:12 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Me myself personally.
Replies: 4
Views: 2939

Me myself personally.

There seems to be quite a fashion at the moment in the use of the word “myself”. The usage often appears awkward, and I have usually found that awkward generally means wrong. I get letters reading, “if you have any queries, please contact Mr Jones or myself”. I would have thought it should be simply...
by Bobinwales
Fri Feb 04, 2005 5:06 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: couples
Replies: 39
Views: 15815

couples

It does look as though MOIETY is the word, although it does lack a little romance, thank you John. moiety noun (pl. moieties) 1 formal a half. 2 technical each of two parts into which a thing is or can be divided. — ORIGIN Old French moite, from Latin medius ‘mid, middle I know it has nothing to do ...