Search found 134 matches

by paulwiggins
Thu Oct 04, 2007 6:34 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: public convenience
Replies: 75
Views: 22906

public convenience

A blind chap I know insists on using non-satandard instructions to his dog. "Find the googie hole'' he says. Any enlightenment on this would be appreciates. In regards to the first post in the thread, there is an extensive ''Toilet'' entry in Wikipedia, thus proving that some people have far too muc...
by paulwiggins
Thu Oct 04, 2007 6:25 am
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Australian Citizenship Test 2007
Replies: 4
Views: 2852

Australian Citizenship Test 2007

1. Do you understand the meaning, but are unable to explain the origin of, the term "died in the arrse"? ___________________________________ 2. What is a bloody little beauty?? ___________________________________ 3. Are these terms related: chuck a sickie; chuck a spaz; chuck a U-ey? _______________...
by paulwiggins
Thu Oct 04, 2007 4:06 am
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Ruggers
Replies: 24
Views: 7175

Ruggers

Presented without malice: http://youtube.com/watch?v=rQiarWZruCc
by paulwiggins
Wed Sep 05, 2007 7:59 am
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Ruggers
Replies: 24
Views: 7175

Ruggers

When it comes to rugby, I'm still a New Zealander. I'd barrack for Wales any day ahead of the Wallabies. Looks nervously over his shoulder for the men from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.
by paulwiggins
Wed Sep 05, 2007 7:44 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: "I bags that"
Replies: 38
Views: 32246

"I bags that"

Note wiktionary is wrong on this the term is also used in New Zealand, from memory it was more common among people of irish ancestry. Dictionary.com suggests it is of British origin. I'd punt for an etymology relationg to putting marbles in a bag. Two other things of note One used to say in kiwiland...
by paulwiggins
Tue Sep 04, 2007 6:05 am
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: Ruggers
Replies: 24
Views: 7175

Ruggers

One notes it is that time again. Let the snarkiness commence.
by paulwiggins
Tue Sep 04, 2007 6:01 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: figmental
Replies: 13
Views: 3142

figmental

Subbery, a bit like nunnery, a place for subeditors (traditionally on senior grades in NZ and Australian production models).

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by paulwiggins
Mon Sep 03, 2007 4:44 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: figmental
Replies: 13
Views: 3142

figmental

Ken, The sound you are hearing is the sound of champagne corks raining down on the subbery floor.
by paulwiggins
Fri Aug 31, 2007 4:44 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: figmental
Replies: 13
Views: 3142

figmental

Across my desk this week a letter about figmental terrorist aeropleanes flying over Sydney during the APEC summit. Ain't no such word but one feels there should be.
by paulwiggins
Thu Aug 30, 2007 6:31 am
Forum: Addicts' Corner
Topic: A little game for you
Replies: 19
Views: 6753

A little game for you

For the record .... the first issue of the Times was riddled with errors, as those of you with souvenir anniversary copies could attest.
by paulwiggins
Wed Aug 29, 2007 6:01 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: Nouns singular & plural
Replies: 22
Views: 8139

Nouns singular & plural

trolley wrote: If I caught a bass, a trout, and a walleye, did I catch three fish or three fishes?
When focusing on differentiating between types one may say fishes.
by paulwiggins
Wed Aug 29, 2007 5:53 am
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: flats
Replies: 31
Views: 7713

flats

No hot water, quite common before World War II
by paulwiggins
Thu Jul 05, 2007 7:14 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: (back) yard
Replies: 26
Views: 5736

(back) yard

Funny you should ask that. I would have expected them too, but no they don't. That might well be that I'm looking at matters on suburban fringes rather than city hearts.
by paulwiggins
Thu Jul 05, 2007 4:33 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: rugby
Replies: 12
Views: 3081

rugby

The chaps at twickers chime in with this T he Birth of the Union By 1870 it became clear that the game was being played to a variety of rules. In December 1870 Edwin Ash, Secretary of Richmond Club, and B. H. Burns, the Honorary Secretary of Blackheath put a letter in the papers which said, "Those w...
by paulwiggins
Thu Jul 05, 2007 4:11 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Announcing news before it happens
Replies: 22
Views: 5458

Announcing news before it happens

I call it lazy journalism. And back when I was a PR person (before my more lucrative days as a tech writer), members of the electronic media took me to task over "press releases." The more universal term is "news release" (although that is often a misnomer). Bin fodder I call them. What I like abou...