Search found 1844 matches

by tony h
Tue Apr 04, 2006 9:43 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: triquarterly
Replies: 11
Views: 2357

triquarterly

looking at ther website I note that on page http://www.centerforbookculture.org/pages/publications.html they describe the publication as being QUARTERLY! CONTEXT CONTEXT is a quarterly publication intended to create a historical and cultural context in which to read modern and contemporary literatur...
by tony h
Mon Apr 03, 2006 10:48 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: triquarterly
Replies: 11
Views: 2357

triquarterly

biweekly or bimonthly are defined as either every two weeks or twice a week etc. So presumably the same would be true of triquarterly. Maybe (but I suspect not) it is to differentiate between monthly and three times a month eg every 30.5 days. But in this case triquarterly would be imprecise as it w...
by tony h
Sun Apr 02, 2006 7:16 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: windlass
Replies: 10
Views: 1443

windlass

Haro , I am intrigued by your assertion that "English very often completely distorts the pronunciation of foreign words as soon as it adopts them". Clearly you can see distorsions over time especially between the competing elements of "English" and Norman. But I have always put this down to an inabi...
by tony h
Wed Mar 29, 2006 10:37 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: A dove diving
Replies: 11
Views: 2875

A dove diving

I use both dove and dived. I use worked normally but wrought in craftsmanship (particularly metals) eg : wrought-iron; finely wrough silver; wrought in leather. Maybe worked is your effort and wrought is what you do to materials?
by tony h
Wed Mar 29, 2006 9:18 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: further or farther
Replies: 16
Views: 4155

further or farther

Maybe there is the opportunity to coin a couple of new terms "dirty shouldered" or "clean shouldered". It would give some interesting opportunities. Jim gets his shoulders dirty - Jim will provide good help to others even if he gets no credit. I could't have achieved this without getting Jim's shoul...
by tony h
Mon Mar 27, 2006 8:50 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: boffin
Replies: 4
Views: 1328

boffin

the bbcword bit is public. I personally think the personal subscription is too expensive at around £200 a year.
by tony h
Mon Mar 27, 2006 8:32 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: ghost in the machine
Replies: 21
Views: 8155

ghost in the machine

Dear Hans, My wife tells me it appears in the novel The Blue Nowhere by Jeffry Deaver. It is certainly a phrase I have used since the mid 90s. I was working on a project to explore remote information gathering. Sitting outside a building and electronically seeing what was being photocopied, or what ...
by tony h
Mon Mar 27, 2006 4:19 pm
Forum: No, wait. Don't tell me
Topic: Headline
Replies: 6
Views: 1831

Headline

Local paper headline:

Irish harpoonist enters Miss Wales contest

(deciding on the spelling is always difficult with these)
by tony h
Mon Mar 27, 2006 10:41 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: boffin
Replies: 4
Views: 1328

boffin

Guy,
the BBC featured this word on their Wordhunt - a programme that sought to find the origins of words with the aim of getting them into the OED.
http://www.oed.com/bbcwordhunt/boffin.html

regards
by tony h
Sun Mar 26, 2006 2:29 pm
Forum: Miscellaneous
Topic: ghost in the machine
Replies: 21
Views: 8155

ghost in the machine

A bug is different to a Ghost - at least in the way we use it. A bug is when something does not work. The origin for this is amusing (depending on your sense of humor) In the early days of computers there were a lot more moving parts. One time one of these machines was malfunctioning - an exhaustive...
by tony h
Sun Mar 26, 2006 9:59 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Polotaswarf
Replies: 17
Views: 3871

Polotaswarf

I am trying to get hold of a copy. I will let you know if I find out. But it might take a while.

regards
by tony h
Sat Mar 25, 2006 10:47 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Polotaswarf
Replies: 17
Views: 3871

Polotaswarf

Eric, You raised some doubt as to whether Kingsley would have read the Heimskringla in Old Norse. My reasearch suggests that he would have not to do so. Samuel Laing translated the Heinskringla into English and it was piblished in 1844. Kingsley's Hereward the Wake was not published until 1866. I su...
by tony h
Thu Mar 23, 2006 11:03 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: moon - the origin of the word
Replies: 5
Views: 1654

moon - the origin of the word

Hans, I am not worthy to share the same web space as you. I only remember the Anglo-Saxon from my youth (my studies you understand not my childhood language)

regards
by tony h
Thu Mar 23, 2006 10:56 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Titles and office
Replies: 8
Views: 1316

Titles and office

Dear K.Allen, Queen is a title (as is Sir) so it is Queen Elizabeth II but Queen is also an office so you can say The Queen, Queen Elizabeth II. Sir is a title so it is Sir Anthony. Similarly : - His Grace the Duke. - Mr Brown The Chancellor - The Chancellor Mr Brown But not : - Mr Chancellor Brown ...
by tony h
Thu Mar 23, 2006 4:46 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: moon - the origin of the word
Replies: 5
Views: 1654

moon - the origin of the word

A good old Anglo-saxon word Mona