Search found 60 matches

by incarnatus est
Sun Dec 06, 2009 2:50 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: in cahoots
Replies: 16
Views: 12737

cahoot & cahoots

Curious about the origin of "in cahoots" and too lazy to go back on the Internet late last night, I looked it up in the OED and a Webster's collegiate. Both offer "cahoot" This morning, on the Internet, I found only "cahoots." Was it ever "cahoot" as the venerable OED offers? I'm wondering if "cahoo...
by incarnatus est
Sun Jun 28, 2009 8:03 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: speechifyin'
Replies: 12
Views: 3032

Re: speechifyin'

I would imagine that if it were said of a public person that he would be "making a speech," or "speechmaking," people would expect the content to be pre-planned and formal. If a public figure was about to be introduced somewhere and it was whispered to him: "No speechifyin'," I'd say the introducer ...
by incarnatus est
Sat Jun 27, 2009 5:24 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: speechifyin'
Replies: 12
Views: 3032

Re: speechifyin'

Thanks.

You made me wonder if the suffix "-ifying" usually denotes an unpleasant situation. e.g. stultifying, mortifying.

I sure would like to know a history of "speechifying," though.

Hugh Gilmore
by incarnatus est
Thu Jun 25, 2009 12:51 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: speechifyin'
Replies: 12
Views: 3032

speechifyin'

Any information about where and how this word got started?

Is it always used to lampoon speechmaking?

Thanks, Hugh Gilmore
by incarnatus est
Mon Apr 13, 2009 1:51 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: A badger's sett
Replies: 3
Views: 1481

Re: A badger's sett --too easy

Thank you gentlemen.

That was too easy. I'm chagrined. That's the last time I look up defs (my word) after midnight, after a dinner party.

Hugh Gilmore
The boy who cried "sett."
by incarnatus est
Sun Apr 12, 2009 7:19 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: A badger's sett
Replies: 3
Views: 1481

A badger's sett

In The book "Bookshop" by Penelope Fitzgerald, I read on p.12, lines 1 & 2: "Mr. Brundish...lived as closely in his house as a badger in its sett." In context, I took the word "sett" to mean a "den" or "burrow." I checked OED and did not find a definition that would work in this context. I wonder if...
by incarnatus est
Wed Apr 08, 2009 8:42 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: "Neither" (how much can I pack in here before I say:) "Nor"?
Replies: 6
Views: 1589

Re: "Niether" (how much can I pack in here before I say:) "Nor"?

Response to both of you...first, thank you. Then to Erik: Here's what the Chicago Manual of Style says: " Correlative conjunctions are used in pairs, often to join successive clauses that depend on each other to form a complete thought. Correlative conjunctions must frame structurally identical or m...
by incarnatus est
Wed Apr 08, 2009 5:32 pm
Forum: Usage and Writing
Topic: "Neither" (how much can I pack in here before I say:) "Nor"?
Replies: 6
Views: 1589

"Neither" (how much can I pack in here before I say:) "Nor"?

Can the correlative conjunction pair, "neither/nor," sandwich more than two items? I remember vaguely being told in school that it should be restricted to two items only. e.g.: "Neither A, B, C, D, nor E could stop him from..."? If not, what construction could be used in its place? Thank you, Hugh G...
by incarnatus est
Mon Apr 06, 2009 7:23 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings Archive
Topic: Chicago, that toddlin' town
Replies: 11
Views: 13171

Re: Chicago, that toddlin' town

Ken: I'm not sure what "non-identification" means...is it that I didn't enter my name after my question?

If so, I forgot. But I'll be more careful in the future.

Hugh Gilmore
by incarnatus est
Mon Apr 06, 2009 3:05 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings Archive
Topic: Chicago, that toddlin' town
Replies: 11
Views: 13171

Chicago Chicago, that toddling town

In what sense do you think Chicago is referred to in this Frank Sinatra song as a "toddling" town?
by incarnatus est
Sun Mar 08, 2009 5:12 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: fistfought ?
Replies: 3
Views: 1555

fistfought ?

Is "fistfought" acceptable for past tense of verb: fistfight?

Thank you, Hugh Gilmore
by incarnatus est
Thu Jan 29, 2009 5:04 am
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Why a "lid"
Replies: 15
Views: 48749

Why a "lid"

A "lid" of marijuana is a one-ounce portion, according to the Urban Dictionary.

But why a "lid"?

How did "lid" get to be a unit of measure, and is it a measure of anything other than marijuana?

Thanks, Hugh Gilmore
by incarnatus est
Wed Jan 28, 2009 5:14 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Was the term "memory bank" current in 1985 in USA?
Replies: 9
Views: 2874

Re: Was the term "memory bank" current in 1985 in USA?

Thanks one and all for helping me get a grasp on this term. FYI: The detective in the novel is a former Ph.D. candidate in Psychology who didn't finish his dissertation. He's an "All but dissertation, " or ABD guy, very common in a college town like Ann Arbor. He sprinkles his speech with bits of le...
by incarnatus est
Sun Jan 25, 2009 5:19 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: Was the term "memory bank" current in 1985 in USA?
Replies: 9
Views: 2874

Was the term "memory bank" current in 1985 in USA?

I'm writing a novel set in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1985. A detective says to a suspect, "Does that get your memory bank stirring?" Then I wondered if the term "memory bank" was in common use then. ALSO: I use "stirring" here simply to mean, "operating," or "working." Is there a word more germane to ...
by incarnatus est
Tue Oct 21, 2008 8:06 pm
Forum: Word Origins and Meanings
Topic: chrissake
Replies: 2
Views: 2432

chrissake

Example: "For chrissake, stop doing that."

The word "chrissake" :

Is there a preference in writing for lower case "c" over upper case "C" ?

Thank you, HG